Thursday, September 11, 2014

Bromeliads and Succulents

I've been shopping for more Agave 'Blue Glow' to add to a bed I'm planning to renovate.  In addition to the beauty it adds in every setting, I think it may be an effective raccoon deterrent - and I've certainly tried everything else.  The problem is that the price of these popular plants have soared into the stratosphere.  At one time, I was able to get  a small plant for $10 but recently the lowest price I've seen was $35.  After considering pulling plants from other areas to fulfill my current purpose, I decided to pay another visit to the Marina Del Rey Garden Center, where I originally found the plants for $10.

This garden center has definitely gotten the message that Southern California gardeners need drought tolerant plants.  Although they've always had a nice selection of succulents in a range of sizes, they seem to have more every time I visit.  They've also added a lot of bromeliads to the mix.  The price of bromeliads usually makes me choke and I can't say that the Marina garden center's prices are low but they do have a large variety.

The new emphasis on bromeliads struck me as soon as I pulled into the parking lot.

Display garden fronting the parking lot (I can't account for the pink flamingos)





There were more in the main section of the nursery.









The succulents are nearby.

Most of the 4-inch pots are $5, which means I can quickly get in trouble in this section


These variegated Agave attenuata were on special



They've always had containers planted with succulents for sale and display but there seemed to be more of them when I visited this time.








I brought home 3 Agave 'Blue Glow,' purchased for $17 a piece.  Oh, and a bromeliad.

No ID provided with purchase Possibly Aechmea fosteriana (Thanks again for the ID rosekraft!)


All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party


20 comments:

  1. What an inspiring nursery display of succulents and whatnot. I really like the "underwater landscape/seascape" style of succulent garden, but I do sometimes think about how costly it would be to accumulate ALL the beautiful plants that you'd need. I imagine that the best of those gardens are achieved after years of growing-on and propagating...or, maybe, a lottery win :-)

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    1. You're right that the cost of succulents puts a crimp on one's design plans. I can understand the price of the large specimen agaves as most grow slowly but the price of some of the smaller plants can be galling, especially as propagation here is so easy. I need to put some effort into setting up my own on-site succulent nursery. In the meantime, it has been great to find more garden centers offering 6-packs of common succulents.

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  2. The plants are displayed in a very tempting way in this garden centre, it would be very easy to spend a serious amount of money although I didn't think a lot of the plants were over-priced. I'm looking forward to seeing your new succulent border, I'd like to do something similar but no-where in the garden shouts at me that it is the right place for them. BTW succulents are called piante grasse in Italian which translates as fat plants!

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    1. Your winter temperatures probably present a challenge to in-ground succulent plantings, too, Christina. Most do very well in pots so that may be a good way to indulge your interest while also allowing you to move them under cover during cold periods. I have a surprising number in pots and other containers myself, although mine can stay outside year-round.

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  3. Keep checking Home Depot for the 'Blue Elves' especially the landscape succulent section often off to the side. I love love love the turquoise pots you have pictured with elephant food, big pink thing like echeveria, black aeonium and African poinsettia.

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    1. This garden center does a nice job of putting together succulent collections; however, the price tags make you blink (if not choke). I rely on my photos to support future DIY.

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  4. I'll be like a kid in a sweet shop if we have something like that nursery here :) well mainly for the succulents. The bromeliads looks great with so many displayed. Will you consider adding more in your garden from now on?

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    1. I have a couple other bromeliads in pots - one inside and another outside. I've been nervous about planting them in the ground but I should bite the bullet and start experimenting - it's the best way to learn what works and what doesn't.

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  5. I would love to see a display of Bromeliads like that at a local nursery up here. I love the one you got, such fabulous spots!

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    1. It seems as though there are a lot more varieties available than I recall seeing in the past, Alison. It's hard to resist some of those leaves.

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  6. Wow! So many colors and shapes......it's really fun for this easterner to see so many drought tolerant plants.....I'll be looking forward to your re-do.

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    1. Our climate couldn't be more different from yours in New England, Flower Freak. Although I'm a native Californian, it took me awhile to warm up to succulents but I've come to appreciate their sculptural qualities, their color range, and their hardiness in this climate.

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  7. Wow! what a fantastic range of succulenter you have!
    Mariana

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    1. Succulents were made for this climate, Mariana.

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  8. I had my DH, who has been growing bromeliads since the '70's and involved with the BSSF for almost as long, took a quick look at your new brom and said it was probably an Aechmea fosteriana.

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    1. Thank you rosekraft! That was very kind of you.

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  9. Wow, a feast for the eyes. That new bromeliad is lovely, I especially like the dark teeth.

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  10. Wow, so many bromeliads and succulents at that nursery. As colorful as a field of flowers.

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    1. Succulents are becoming a bigger part of all our nurseries/garden centers here, sweetbay - you can always count on them to survive our climate. The bromeliads are also gaining ground. I hadn't thought about it until now but their value per square foot of growing space probably provides a better return for the nurseries than most perennials.

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