Saturday, September 6, 2014

Deep Roots Garden Center

On a recent visit to Deep Roots Garden Center in Manhattan Beach, I was surprised to realize that I'd never written a post about it.  When it opened, I lived in one of the nearby beach cities but not long afterwards we moved to our current house, roughly 15 miles to the south, so I don't have an opportunity to drop in regularly.  However, the garden center specializes in water-wise plants and, as I'm currently on the hunt for more drought-tolerant selections, I swung by there twice recently, once with my camera in tow.

The garden center sits on a relatively small plot on Sepulveda Boulevard, surrounded by retail businesses on 3 sides and homes in the rear.  The staff makes maximum use of the space they have available.


The parking lot doubles as storage for fruit trees, like this Guava tree, and bedding plants

Entryway to the garden center's main area



There are lots of succulents, although some of the most interesting are available only in large containers at hefty prices.

I loved this Aloe greenii 'Icena,' seated next to a Beschorneria yuccoides

There were lots of small succulents

And some very big ones, like the Furcraea and Agave 'Blue Glow' here

I couldn't find the ID for this Agave but I liked the bright spines

This Aloe camperi 'Jennifer' was new to me

I think a spiral Aloe may go on my Christmas wish list

Dyckia 'Naked Lady' isn't as spiky as those I have but it was attractive

If I knew where to put this Synadenium grantii, a relative of the Euphorbia, it might have come home with me


Beyond the succulents, there are shade plants.


Maybe it was the red background but I fell for this Begonia 'Paul Hernandez,' which grows 4-6 feet tall but, with nowhere to put it, it was left behind

Unfortunately, Cordyline 'Caruba Black,' shown here with Persian Shield, requires lots of water



Perennials can be found lined up at the other end of the garden center.


I'm trying to think of a place for this purple smoke bush

Digiplexis 'Illumination Flame' looks great in front of a red wall



Edible and water-wise plants are a few steps up and toward the back of the property.  I came in looking for Leucadendron 'Jester,' which they had but only in large pots.

The Leucadendron collection

A variety of drought tolerant plants arranged around a huge driftwood centerpiece





I came home with a Grevillea 'Ned Kelly,' a Vitex agnus-castus, and 2 Pentas lanceolata.  As a bonus, I got a good picture of a Gulf Fritillary.




All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

16 comments:

  1. Haha! I think only people who've lived in LA can appreciate how far 15 miles is.

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    1. Here, 15 miles usually means 30 minutes and, if you take the freeway and you're unlucky, it can take an hour - our freeways are gruesome! I'm actually in the Manhattan Beach area quite a bit but my trek doesn't usually take me through that area.

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  2. Thanks for the reminder, Kris, to check them out again for fall planting. Paul Hernandez is a great begonia for a pot, in my experience not requiring more water than any potted plant. I do love that Naked Lady dyckia. Shoot, I was working near the airport yesterday and could have swung by....next time!

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    1. I need to make a point to swing by there more often myself, Denise. It's not part of my usual commute in and out of the area so I forget about it.

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  3. A well-stocked garden center!
    Agree that that Digiplexis 'Illumination Flame' looks great in front of a red wall.
    Mariana

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    1. That was a perfect backdrop for the Digiplexis, wasn't it? Too bad I don't have any red walls in my garden.

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  4. So many goodies there but my eyes immediately zoomed in on the beautiful variegated beaucarneas they have for sale.

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    1. You have good taste - those cost a pretty penny!

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  5. So many great plants! Funny, many of the plants in the shade plant area are ones we grow in full sun. (What passes for full sun here.) If I lived there Synadenium grantii would have come home with me even if I didn't know where to put it. Such a beauty! The begonia was also pretty cool! I'm hoping to keep my 'Ned Kelly' alive this winter by pulling it inside during the coldest part of winter. Looks like you had a grand time at this nursery!

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    1. In contrast, here some of the plants intended for full sun do better with a bit of shade, Peter! I hope you're able to keep 'Ned Kelly' going throughout the winter - hopefully, winter this year will be less awful.

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  6. Nice nursery visit, and I had to smile at Emily's comment above. Fifteen miles isn't anything for a nursery visit in these parts...

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    1. Your freeways are probably not as awful as ours, Loree - it sometimes takes me an hour to get that distance. Surface streets are more predictable but even those are riddled with road improvement projects. The main street outside my own neighborhood is currently undergoing major work (July-October) and the roadblocks usually add 15 or more minutes to any trip.

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  7. Hi Kris, I just found your blog and was especially happy when I realized that you are gardening in Southern California, too!
    With the ongoing drought that we are having here, I definitively have to look more into plants that require less water, so your nursery tour is very interesting to me. Of course, the plant that I find most fascinating is cordyline 'Caruba Black', which you said is pretty water thirsty. But I also like the purple smoke bush very much. Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Thanks for leaving a comment, Christina! You're certainly dealing with similar water issues in San Diego. A friend and I are planning to check out some nurseries down south in Escondido and Encinitas specializing in water-wise plants later this fall.

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  8. Hi Kris, I just found a link to this book and as its by Pam Penick who I've seen comment on your blog I thought it might be useful. http://www.amazon.com/Lawn-Gone-Low-Maintenance-Sustainable-Alternatives/dp/1607743140/ref=la_B0092KM462_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407764655&sr=1-1 Christina

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    1. Thanks Christina! I have Pam Penick's book and have pulled it out for review in connection with my upcoming project.

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