Monday, September 1, 2014

In a Vase on Monday: Summer Reruns

Today is Labor Day, officially a date to observe the advances made by workers or, more specifically, the achievements of labor unions on behalf of workers.  For most people here in the US, the date is more closely associated with the end of summer than with the labor union movement, which I personally find sad.  But that's not a topic for this blog or this post, which celebrates bouquets assembled from what's available in the garden.  In my garden, some of the flowers that bloomed earlier this summer have produced a fresh flush of blooms, including the beautiful Eustoma grandiflorum 'Borealis Blue,' which I've used as the centerpiece of this week's vase.





I've combined the Eustoma (aka Lisianthus) with other summer reruns, some of which are also enjoying a new flush of blooms:

  • 4 stems of Angelonia augustifolia
  • 3 stems of Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold'
  • 2 stems of Hebe 'Wiri Blush'
  • 2 stems of Pelargonium peltatum (ivy geranium)
  • 5 stems of Pennisetum setaceum 'Rubrum'
  • 3 stems of Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-star'


White Angelonia, from a mix purchased as part of a 6-pack in June

Variegated foliage of Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-star' in close-up, accompanied by Coleonema and Pennisetum plumes

Vase photographed from the back

Hebe 'Wiri Blush' is still flowering, although the blooms are fewer and smaller than those produced earlier this summer

I brought this trailing ivy geranium from our former house but have no ID on the variety



The vase I selected this week didn't keep the blooms in place, even after an inordinate amount of fussing, so I used a rubber band to tie the heavier stems together.  I placed the Pelargonium and Angelonia stems in separately so I can remove them easily when they tucker out.  I've previously discovered that the Pelargonium petals fall apart after a few days in a vase.

As usual, I ended up with a vase of leftover elements.  The stems of these materials were either too stiff or too short to work in the larger vase.

The leftovers include Cuphea 'Starfire Pink,' a bee and hummingbird magnet, Pentas 'Nova,' Salvia 'Mystic Spires,' and Plectranthus zuluensis



The vases are in position.

The larger vase sits on the dining room table

and the smaller vase ended up in the guest bathroom



I hope you have a great day, however you're spending this Monday.  Please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to see her vase and to find links to the creations of other gardeners.


All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

17 comments:

  1. That small blue vase is a beauty - I love it, and what a good way to display the leftovers! As always you have combined the contents for your main vase to perfection - and I have made a note of the Pennisetum as that would be a useful addition to my garden (and to vases of course)

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    1. The small blue vase was a wedding gift from a friend and co-worker many (many) years ago. The Pennisetum setaceum is a wonderful plant but it does need a lot of room, Cathy. There are dwarf varieties but their plumes aren't as impressive.

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    2. Cathy the Pennisetum needs to be treated as an annual even in my garden, but if you can buy one early in spring it is a valuable addition to the garden (and a vase).

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  2. Wow Kris these are gorgeous. I love that blue vase and the flowers you chose...and the other vase has such rich deep colors especially the Lisianthus....wonderful flower arrangements.

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    1. That Lisianthus will be on my summer planting list until the end of time, Donna. It's incredible.

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  3. Another fabulous mix of floral arrangements Kris, and especially loving the Borealis Blue! The first pic also reminds me of turn of the century ladies hats for some reason.

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    1. Ha! I can see what you mean by the 1st picture, although it didn't occur to me until you mentioned it. The arrangement has a 3-cornered shape with plumes in the back - it would make a very pretty hat.

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  4. Very pretty. I felt silly asking so I googled it first to make sure it wasn't, but the Eustoma (to my inexperienced eye) looks a lot like a rose. Even the bud. Perhaps not from the side though.

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    1. It does look like a rose, doesn't it? I've heard that a blue rose is the holy grail of the nursery world. The foliage is very different - the Eustoma's foliage is almost succulent. The flower's center, not shown in my photographs here, is also different. Although not a rose, it's wonderful!

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  5. You always manage to combine colours that I wouldn't think work together, but they do for you perfectly. I love the way the variegated foliage of Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-star' reflects the Pennisetum plumes. The second vase is almost more beautiful than the first. Your garden is obviously enjoying the slightly cooler weather. Your plants purchased in June have done well despite the heatwave early on.

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    1. I didn't expect the Eustoma to come back as well as it has, Christina, but, looking back at some of last year's photos, I discovered that the pink Eustoma I had then also came back strong in the fall.

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  6. Those are gorgeous bouquets! I love the brilliant colors.

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  7. Beautiful arrangements! It's lovely for me to see flowers that aren't normally grown here in Germany. I had never heard of Eustoma before - very impressive! :)

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    1. Buying more Eustoma is already on my "to do" list for 2015, Cathy. While they are short-lived perennials here, they're best when replanted annually.

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  8. Beautiful vases, the Eustoma is fabulous and the Pennisetum sets everything off so well. I have never heard of Angelonia, it is so pretty.

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    1. Angelonia is known as the summer snapdragon here, Chloris. They're very good for summer color as they handle the heat (if not necessarily, drought).

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