Friday, September 11, 2015

Lynda's Succulent Garden Revisited

In July last year, I posted photos of my friend Lynda's succulent garden.  Being both an artist and a perfectionist, she's continued to futz with both her design and her plant selections, which is good for me as every time she's planning a change usually means we make a trip to our favorite succulent garden center in Orange County.  In advance of one such trip, I took photos of the succulent beds in the front of her townhouse.

Her succulent beds are enclosed within tiered, brick-lined planters along the right and left sides of her sloped driveway.  Here's the first tier on the right side.

The bed is tightly packed but the plants are very happy

Close-up of Agave desmettiana, Graptoveria 'Fred Ives', Euphorbia tirucalli and Crassula capitella 'Campfire' 

Agave 'Blue Flame', Agave Blue Glow', more Graptoveria and Euphorbia, and Sedum rupestre 'Lemon Ball'

Another view of the plants shown above plus what I think is Agave pgymaea 'Dragon Toes'


The second tier planting bed on the right side featured (past tense) Opuntia santarita.  As it had become impossible to weed around the Opuntia, it was destined for removal when I visited.

Lynda intends to replace the Opuntia with another Agave 'Blue Flame'

Agave desmettiana, Euphorbia tirucalli and Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi 'Variegata' among other smaller succulents (Let me know if you can name the plant in front - I can't identify it Thanks to Jane, the plant in front has been identified as Crassula arborescens 'Blue Waves' aka Crassula ovata undulata)

The condemned Opuntia sandwiched between 2 Euphorbia tirucalli

Manfreda x 'Silver Leopard' backed up by Euphorbia and an unidentified Aloe


The succulent bed on the left side of the driveway is wider and serves as a divider between Lynda's property and that of her neighbor.  

Lynda added beach pebbles to create a pathway she could use when weeding the bed

Agave 'Joe Hoak' provides a focal point in this bed

Aloe cameronii (with what may be a crested Euphorbia in front)

Lynda has used plant repetition and contrasting foliage texture and color to great effect.  Since last July, she has removed the Abelia 'Kaleidoscope' that formerly shared the beds, added lots of rock, rearranged plants and added new ones.  It looks great now and I have no doubt that it'll look great next year too - only probably different.


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

20 comments:

  1. Crassula ovata undulata, but may be Crassula arborescens 'Blue Waves'. (The namers in the know aren't sure.) It was labelled Crassula 'Blue Waves' when I bought it.

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    1. Thanks for the ID, Jane! With your information I found still another alternative on-line: Crassula arborescens subsp. undulatifolia so confusion appears rampant. I'll use the 'Blue Waves' ID as its the most memorable.

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  2. No clue as to the missing name (and no guesses, either!) but a vote of appreciation for just enough variety to provide interest with plenty of repetition to draw the eye through the spaces. I hope you'll post her "different" look when next you visit.

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    1. I'd have to post monthly to capture all her design tweaks but I'll provide another update down the road.

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  3. Very nice! I especially like the graptoverias and Manfreda 'Silver Leopard'.

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    1. I have what I suspect is the same Manfreda. Mine was just labeled M. maculosa but it's a dead ringer (albeit smaller than Lynda's specimen).

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  4. The plants have really come along nicely! I love when succulents are densely planted (even if they don't like it that way). But the effect that she has created is wonderfully artistic

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    1. I don't think the plants mind being crowded at this stage but, as some of them grow, I think she's going to be doing a lot of dividing and replanting. I hope I get some of the pups and divisions ;)

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  5. I love the Sticks on Fire next to the Agave desmettiana with the little yellow edge, great combo. I have some Sticks on Fire that I'm going to have to bring in for the winter. I know I can get them every year here as small starts, but I'm hoping mine will get bigger after a few years potted up.

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    1. I've got a few Sticks on Fire in the ground myself but they've been taking their time developing any girth, which is fine with me. They can get very, very big. If you didn't see it, check out Piece of Eden's post on Eichler Landscapes (dated 9/1) - it features a huge specimen in a front yard.

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  6. It's filling in nicely and lovely planting! Shame the opuntia had to go but a Blue Glow replacement sounds good too.

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    1. She had no way of getting to the Opuntia without great bodily injury. It was a beautiful specimen, though.

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  7. Her neighbor is fortunate! The succulent beds are so interesting with each plant deserving close attention, and yet the tapestry-like overall view is wonderful. I love the Agave desmettiana!

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    1. The neighbors are all quite impressed and stop by to tell her so every time she's out tending the garden. She's having an influence on others in the neighborhood too.

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  8. Your friends has a keen eye for combing the plants. A perfect treatment of a shared driveway.

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    1. She has an artist's eye for color, texture and balance, Jenny.

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  9. Really cool small garden. She done so much with a limited space.

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    1. I'm impressed too. I hope my own succulent bed looks half as good someday.

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  10. Wow, Kris, your friend did an incredible job in her succulent beds! I think these are one of the nicest succulent plantings that I have seen so far in a private garden. It absolutely pays off that she is tinkering with the plants and with the design. Her garden is truly an inspiration! Thanks for sharing it on your blog, again.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. She'll appreciate the compliment, Christina!

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