Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: From not quite ripe to gone overnight...






20 comments:

  1. Oh, darn, darn, darn! What can you do? It's so frustrating to await with eager anticipation your fruit harvest and then find just as soon as it is about ripe, whoosh, it's gone. I know.

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    1. I'm mostly annoyed at myself, Jane. I talked to my husband about cutting the grapes when I found them nearing ripeness but we took a chance and chose to leave them on the vine for a few more days.

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  2. That's heartbreaking! Is the culprit known or still a mysterious midnight bandit?

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    1. I didn't see the criminal in action, Barbara, but I'm fairly certain it was a raccoon. The damage to the vine itself and the fact that the theft occurred at night are tell-tale signs.

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  3. Hmmm...quite mysterious, birds perhaps?

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    1. I think birds were responsible for stripping the vines last year but I don't think they're responsible for this event. Birds have few taste buds and don't mind eating unripe, sour green grapes. The uninvited dinner guest left the green gapes alone, eating only the mostly ripe ones.

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  4. The same thing is happening to my strawberries. I should net them, but at this point, it's probably not worth it. Next year.

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    1. I had the same thought, Alison. There are still unripe, green grapes left. The birds may take those since they don't mind the sour taste but, if the remaining grapes partially ripen like those I showed in the first picture, I'm cutting them.

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  5. There are squirrels eating my strawberries, I understand your frustration.

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    1. The squirrels usually take my blueberries if I don't pick them promptly. Come to think of it, that may be why I haven't had many strawberries yet this year...

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  6. Replies
    1. My best guess is a raccoon, although it could be a possum. Possums are somewhat less common here. The theft occurred at night and, based on the damage done to the vine, it was a heavy animal. (If there are rats heavy enough to break pieces of the vine off at the stem like that, I don't want to know about it.)

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  7. Hav a Hart trap.
    Large noisy dog.

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    1. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to convince my husband that I "need" a dog, Jean, and I'm not sure where I could move the raccoon (or possum) if I caught it. Too bad I can't entice the neighborhood coyotes to run a patrol for me...

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  8. So that's how you make those California raisins, I always wondered. Do they sing and dance like the ones on T.V? Sorry about your grapes being eaten!

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    1. I'd forgotten all about that commercial, Peter. Maybe the raccoon (or possum) was trying to make wine...

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  9. :)

    Life is filled with grapes that disappear, isn't it???

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    1. Sadly, Susan, in my garden it's an annual event. Thanks for visiting!

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  10. Damn, and the grapes were so beautiful. You have every right to complain about the critters that visit your garden, yours damage things! Mine just entertain.

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  11. Oh noooooo..... drasty critters... those raccoons are devils aren't they? Last summer I had a dwarf peach that was loaded with fruit that was just about ready to harvest and yes, the raccoons got them all in one night. I hope they had intestinal difficulties for eating so much fruit in one sitting, LOL

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