Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Wednesday Vignette: Sunrise on a hot day

I hesitated to publish another post featuring sunrise photos only 3 weeks after an earlier post on the same topic but the following photos, taken earlier this week, capture the sense of scorching heat we've been feeling during our latest heatwave.

Yesterday's sunrise looking out toward Long Beach and the Los Angeles harbor

A long distance view from the master bedroom window, just as the sun stretches along the southeast side of the house - you can see the warm light streaming through the windows on the south side of the house through the glass insets in the front door, as well as how the sun lights up the east-facing side of the Magnolia tree

The sun focuses on the grass (Pennisetum advena 'Rubrum') in the mid-ground on the right and the Western Redbud tree behind it (Cercis occidentalis)

Pennisetum really makes the most of sunlight


The skies are partly cloudy today.  The temperature has fallen to the mid-80sF (29C) but the humidity level sits at 60%.  There's a slight chance of rain but as the last rain forecasts have failed to produce measurable precipitation, I'm not counting on it.

Wherever you are, I hope your day better reflects the norms of the season.  Visit Anna at Flutter & Hum to find images that she and other participating gardeners found interesting this week.


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

16 comments:

  1. I love the sunrise photo and the way the light dances around the garden. 7 out of the last 9 months in the world this year have broken world heat records (and by significant margins). I do hope these heat waves ease off for you - here on the other side of the pacific, we are just starting ours :-(

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    1. It seems we have an endless summer, Matt - and that's not a good thing. I hope your summer is gentler.

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  2. we are still cool enough to have the 'last' fire of winter.

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    1. I can't even remember temperatures here cool enough to warrant a fire in the fireplace, Diana. We had significant heatwaves even in early spring this year. I'm hoping El Nino brings a change, even if it's temporary, although that weather event tends to bring problems of its own.

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  3. Fabulous shots Kris. That Pennisetum really lights up the garden.

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    1. I love that Pennisetum. It looks as though I've lost another portion of my Ceanothus hedge but, rather than re-plant that shrub (which tends to be short-lived here, especially when trimmed continuously as hedge material), I'm going to plant more Pennisetum.

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  4. Just love the sunlight on the Pennisetum! Here's hoping you (and we) get that rain they're talking about...

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    1. We're covered in clouds this morning, Amy, but it doesn't feel as if rain is in the offing, although the forecast still holds a chance of that. At least it's cooler (so far).

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  5. Aw Kris, I can really hear your despair regarding the seemingly endless heat waves... And you're right - that first photo really conveys the feeling that we are targeted by the Death Star. I really liked the feel of the second photo though, with the rays coming through the windows - it is ominously peaceful as it captures the last few minutes of relative comfort, before the sun rises above the roof tops.

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    1. Very early morning has become the most comfortable time of day here, Anna. Even our evenings remain uncharacteristically warm past midnight.

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  6. Beautiful (and hot) sunrise and golden light streaming through your garden. I'd be happy to trade you a bit of cold for some of your heat. It's supposed to be in the 40's tonight here.

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    1. I do wish you could make that trade, Peter. I can't even remember temperatures in the 40s.

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  7. The sun at that angle, the early morning light... beautiful. Sunlight says fall, temps say it's still summer :~/ Thunderstorms and a real lightning show here last night, and further up the mountains tonight. And a nighttime low of 62F here at 3000 ft., oy.

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    1. Our nighttime temperatures have been in the mid-60s too, Luisa, but that's better than last week when they didn't fall below 80F until after midnight. We saw some cloud-to-cloud lightening in the distance Thursday night ourselves. It was beautiful but we got just 0.01 inches of rain here. Still, we had no mudslides - I hope you avoided those too.

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  8. I hope you get some relief from the heat soon. That last shot of the sun on the Pennisetum, though, is pretty magnificent!

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    1. It dropped below 80F today, Alison, so that's progress!

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