Monday, October 19, 2015

In a Vase on Monday: The Last of the Eustoma (maybe)

The pink Eustoma grandiflorum (aka Lisianthus) in my garden got an extended period of bloom with its last flush when 'Mariachi Pink' returned as 'Echo Pink' was finishing up.  In recognition of its stellar performance this season - despite heat, wind, and water restrictions - I thought it deserved one last vase.  If the temperatures ever drop, the pink, yellow, blue and/or white Eustoma may be back for yet another round before the year is out but I'm not counting on major floral displays from any of them.


View from overhead


I kept my vase relatively simple this week so as not to upstage the Eustoma.  Here's what I included:

Clockwise from upper left: Eustoma grandiflorum "Mariachi Pink', Magnolia grandiflora seed cones and leaves, Pennisetum 'Fireworks', and Pentas 'Kaleidoscope Appleblossom'


The vase is sitting on the dining room table, once again displacing the water-less succulent vase as I still haven't gotten around to disassembling it.



Thanks Eustoma for providing me months of blooms and, by my count, 23 vases this year (so far), 12 of which have featured one of the pink varieties.

I thought 'Eustoma' 'Echo Pink' and 'Mariachi Pink' were identical except for their stem length but 'Mariachi' seems a bit deeper in color


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden, the host of "In a Vase on Monday," to find more vases containing locally-collected flowers and plants.


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

44 comments:

  1. Stunning vase this week, Kris! Love that Eustoma! Wow! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eustoma easily trounces all my other flowering plants in terms of the sheer volume of blooms (on small plants to boot!).

      Delete
  2. 23 vases with eustoma? That's an amazing statistic - nearly 6 months of blooms! I think I have mentioned that I have now got seeds to try and grow it myself next year, but I doubt that I will be as successful as you ;) These look lovely today with the magnolia seed cones - much bigger and prettier than those that appear on (but soon fall off) our magnolia. Thanks for sharing, Kris

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope your experiment with Eustoma seeds proves successful, Cathy. They have a reputation of being difficult. I tried growing them from seed once and was unsuccessful but then I'm sloppy when it comes to seed care. I'm lucky in that I can get them as in 6-packs as starter plants.

      Delete
  3. Kris, this is one of your most accomplished vases up to date! The composition is so well balanced and harmonious, it is just a joy to look at.
    I really must get Eustomas for my garden next year. Do you know when they show up in the nurseries? Or did you happen to grow yours from seeds?
    Warm regards,
    Christina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christina, I checked my records and found that I purchased most of my Eustoma in early to mid-May. I did see some in one garden center recently but they were the single-flowered varieties, not the doubles that I prefer (although some of the singles are available in pretty bi-color varities). All mine were planted from 6-packs or 4-inch pots. The 6-packs were slower to start but more prolific bloomers once they got going and, for some reason, the pink ones seem to be the toughest. Please note that, although they're officially classified as Eustoma grandiflorum, they're usually sold as Lisianthus (their old name) so, if you ask for them, I suggest using that name. I did try growing them from seed once but wasn't successful - the seeds have a reputation for being finicky germinators. I'll try to remember to send up smoke signs when I see them in the garden centers next year. Classified as a short-lived perennial, they will over-winter in our climate but they don't seem to be as vigorous in the second year.

      Delete
  4. That is quite the composition this week, Kris! The Eustomas never cease to amaze me, I've been checking into seeds too. The Magnolia seedpods are very nostalgic for me, I don't get to see them here, they add such a nice peach touch. The arching grass is lovely too, and the tiny Penta blooms. I hope things are cooler for you now, I'm looking forward to seeing what you do with your formerly grass areas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We've had cooler weather for the last few days, Hannah, but we're supposed to get back to the mid-80s by Wednesday and expect be stuck there at least through the weekend. Meanwhile, work on the nasty soil that formerly supported our lawn continues. It's slow going, mind-numbing work. It looks as though whomever built the house or, more likely, the patio and walkways dumped lots of sand in places, which didn't mix at all with the native clay soil - ugh!

      Delete
  5. A great sophisticated vase, Kris!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Just beautiful! And the arrangement will make for a great fascinator/hat design too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those Magnolia cones aren't light, guys (at least not until they dry)!

      Delete
  7. Absolutely lovely and it looks especially apropos in your dining room. That's a lot of firepower from one plant type. I'm predicting runs on Eustoma in any garden center carrying them - the word is out! I have one stubbornly persistent blue Eustoma (a native to our area) but it only appears for a few months and the blooms are not nearly so dazzling. You definitely have The Touch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I had to raise them from seed myself, I'd be in trouble, Deb. These double forms have got to be hybrids - all I used to find in the garden centers were the short, single-flowered varieties until maybe 3 years ago. They do seem to like it here, though.

      Delete
  8. magnolia seedcones are new to me, and upstage everythig else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was concerned about the Magnolia seed cones taking center stage, Diana - they are pretty incredible at their red-yellow fuzzy stage. I'm not sure how long it takes them to dry out and become prickly brown cones flashing red berries. Maybe dining with them will give me new insights. The dried brown cones have already been dropping from the tree for a month so I expect the cycle may be relatively brief.

      Delete
  9. Beautiful Kris ! You are the queen of Eustoma !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only someone would pay me to act as the Eustoma (Lisianthus) spokesperson, Kathy - I've certainly delivered on publicity for the plants this year.

      Delete
  10. I'm interested in the relationship between the garden and the arrangement, and always in awe of the work you do for this meme. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Luisa! I see the meme as one way to flaunt plants that might not otherwise get much attention - like Bloom Day but on a more intimate scale, more like Loree's favorite plants meme at "danger garden."

      Delete
  11. A beautiful arrangement - Magnolia seed cones are faves. Your Eustoma have surely been stellar performers both in the garden and in your vases!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's gotten so I can't imagine my garden without Eustoma, Peter!

      Delete
  12. Including the magnolia seed cones was a stroke of genius!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't sure how the Magnolia cones would work in an arrangement, Loree, but I was impressed my their beauty in their immature state and wanted to see if I could work them in somehow. Prior to this year, I don't remember seeing the cones at this stage, only as dried brown husks. Trimming the tree earlier this year promoted more blooms and more cones, drawing them to my attention.

      Delete
  13. What a brilliant idea to use magnolia seed heads. Your eustoma is the equivalent to my anemone I think, except you clearly know what you are doing whereas my success is down to Beginner's Luck I'm sure.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Your long lasting Eustoma is stunning. I have tried it from seed, but it never amounted to much. I think it needs your climate to do well. I love your pink arrangement and aren' t those Magnolia seedheads wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't successful in growing the Eustoma from seed, Chloris. As I recall, the seed packet described the germination process as requiring advanced expertise, which I definitely didn't possess.

      Delete
  15. Eustoma is amazing. Each vase you present seems fresh and varied. I've never noticed the pink on magnolia before. Looks terrific with the pink flowers Kris.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd never noticed the fuzzy immature Magnolia seedpods until this year myself, Susie. We had the tree trimmed in February and got more flowers and, subsequently, more profuse and noticeable seedpods. The pinkish red color really surprised me.

      Delete
  16. You will be sad to say goodbye to the lovely Eustoma - that pink is just so pretty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Last year I got another, smaller flush of bloom in November, Ann, but the weather has been so unpredictable - and generally warmer - this year that I don't know what to expect as winter (or our version of winter) approaches.

      Delete
  17. The pink Eustoma looks so lovely with the Pennisetum! A very nice arrangement with another new sight for me: the magnolia seedheads. Amazing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad I had an opportunity to show those immature Magnolia seedpods off, Cathy. I've previously only seen the brown husks when they fall from the tree.

      Delete
  18. That is one gorgeous last fling for the Eustoma, Kris! Love how you've let it shine in this one :) And the magnolia cones are perfect...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You never know, Amy - like the Terminator, the Eustoma may be back.

      Delete
  19. Another wonderful vase; you not only have gorgeous flowers, you have real florist talent! I love the combination of the various pinks here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Deb! I wonder what my life would have been like if I'd become a florist rather than pursuing the career I selected? I suspect I'd have been much more cheerful.

      Delete
  20. Wow, that is such an outstanding plant, isn't it? I wish I could winter it here. So pink and lovely. The magnolia cones with it--fantastic. I never would have guessed. You are quite the florist, you know!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That Eustoma is right up your alley, Grace! Even here it's generally sold as an annual but it does survive to bloom a second year, if not with the same vigor.

      Delete
  21. The Eustoma is beautiful, it looks so delicate it's hard to believe it can survive dry weather so well. It's a lovely arrangement; I'll remember your idea of using the magnolia seed heads, they look great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Eustoma's foliage is somewhat succulent, Cath, which probably accounts for its resilience. The growers suggest "regular water" but it doesn't get any extra here except for a few weeks immediately after planting.

      Delete
  22. Kris I am bowled over at how many ways you arrange the Eustoma and each time different and gorgeous. This one is a favorite with the magnolia seed cones which I have never seen let alone seen in an arrangement...quite stunning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Donna! I wasn't sure how the Magnolia cones would work in a vase. They're a bit heavy (until they dry out and turn brown) but the vase is able to hold them upright.

      Delete

I enjoy receiving your comments and suggestions. However, with apologies to bona-fide commentators, due to a significant increase in spam, I've eliminated the option to post comments anonymously.