Monday, October 26, 2015

In a Vase on Monday: Pure Sunshine

This week the garden itself selected the flowers for "In a Vase on Monday," the meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  Senna bicapsularis, one of my favorite fall bloomers, suddenly burst into flower.

Senna bicapsularis, aka Winter Cassia, generally blooms in October here.  It's positioned along the fence with my neighbor to the north.  Her yellow Brugmansia sits behind it on the other side of the fence.

The Senna serves as a host plant for sulphur butterflies (Phoebis sennae)


My 'Buttercream' roses are also blooming, perhaps in response to our cooler nighttime temperatures.  The roses pair beautifully with the Senna, making them the obvious choices for my vase.



I kept the plant selection relatively simple, adding just 2 other plants, one to provide foliage support and the other to pick up the brown tones at the center of the Senna flowers.

Top: 'Rosa Buttercream'
Bottom, left to right: Senna bicapsularis, Pittosporum tobira, and Pennisetum 'Fireworks'


But the peach 'Medallion' roses have also produced a few new blooms and, as our daytime temperatures are back in the upper 80sF (30-31C), I decided they'd last longer inside the house so I have a second vase this week.  The roses have weak stems that don't do a good job holding up the blooms.  I probably should have left the roses alone in the vase but the Zinnias in the vegetable garden have also produced an abundance of new blooms, demanding attention, so I stuffed them into the vase as well.  The arrangement makes me think of a flamenco dancer with a flouncy skirt.

Front view with roses (left); back view featuring the Zinnias alone (right)

Top: Floppy-headed Rosa 'Medallion'
Bottom, left to right: Nandina domestica berries (reused from my 2-week old Monday vase), more Pittosporum tobira, and Zinnias grown from seed


The first vase sits in the front entry, providing a cheerful welcome.



The second vase sits on the dining room table, partly because it 's a better match with the table runner and partly because that location allows it to be viewed from 2 sides.



Last week's vase is still intact, although I've removed some of the Eustoma's dried up blooms.  One of the 2 Magnolia cones has dried and turned brown but it hasn't yet dropped.  The 6-week old succulent vase has finally been dismantled.  I planted most of the cuttings, tossing a few, not because they were unusable, but because I already have plenty of those varieties.

Original water-less succulent vase shown in September 14th post (left) and vase immediately prior to dismantling on October 25th (right).  The plants did change over the course of 6 weeks.  Color changes in the Graptosedum 'California Sunset', the Graptopetalum paraguayense, and the noID Rhipsalis are the most obvious but most cuttings lost volume.


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to find more vases created by gardeners celebrating what's "In a Vase on Monday."


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

30 comments:

  1. Your succulent 'vase' has been brilliant, hasn't it? Thanks for showing us its progress over the 6 weeks. That cassia plant with the sulphur butterfly is an amazing sight to see - it is not a plant I have come across, but it looks stunning with the Buttercream roses. I felt very daring adding two yellow roses to my shrub border but although I have had a fair number of blooms they have never been quite right for picking - and I found the colour faded in sunlight which I wasn't expecting. Do you get that with yours? I prefer this sunny vase to your second one which I like better from the back!! ;) Isn't it great to be picking such sunny blooms at the end of October?!

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    1. My 'Buttercream' rose doesn't seem to fade so much as shrivel in the heat, Cathy. The peach roses in the second vase are already drooping so I expect I'll be plucking them out by tomorrow, leaving the Zinnias to carry on alone - I agree that the vase is probably better without the roses. I'm pleased to have another round of bloom in the garden. That's traditional here in the fall (our "second spring") but as the daytime temperatures are still so hot, I was surprised to see the roses reappear. The cooler nighttime temperatures appear to make the difference.

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  2. It must be lovely to see your garden coming back to life after the heat you experienced this summer. The roses are gorgeous and I liked your comment about foliage support, something I should be mindful of when creating vases.

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    1. It's still very warm during the day, Sarah, but at least the nighttime temperatures have been cooler. The garden seems to be responding to those cooler nights. Our Santa Anna winds (aka "devil winds") are due to make their first appearance later this week so we may get warmer still and much, much drier.

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  3. I'm glad cooler weather is finally bringing you some roses, Kris! The Buttercreams look sensational with the yellow Senna flowers, and the Pennisetum makes lovely arches. The Medallion is my favorite peachy color. So many of my roses tend to be floppy in the vase too, but still smell wonderful. They look great with the zinnias and variegated Pittosporum.

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    1. I don't remember the 'Medallion' rose having such wimpy stems before, Hannah. I wonder if this could be yet another drought impact.

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  4. Oh thanks for the glimpse of a fabulous butterfly Kris. I also enjoyed seeing your intriguing living succulent vase.

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    1. I wish I had the patience to get better photos of the sulphur butterflies, Anna. As it was, getting the one photo was a trial as they just don't settle anywhere longer than a nanosecond (or so it seemed to me). Since I planted the Senna a few years ago, my sulphur butterfly population has grown tremendously. I enjoy their cheerful presence (even if I do wish they weren't quite so flighty).

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  5. Your vases are so sunny and warm. I'm very impressed with your succulent vase, I think I will try one of those. Here a link to mine:https://daffodilwild.wordpress.com/2015/10/26/verbena-vase/

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    1. Thanks for the link, Sandra. The succulent vase takes a little longer to put together but it sure does have staying power!

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  6. Kris I really loved these especially seeing roses. You seem to have just the right blooms and fillers to complement the roses....perfection!

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    1. Thanks Donna. This summer had me despairing over the condition of my roses but the cooler nighttime temperatures have really made a difference. I can't say they've exploded with blooms but at least I finally have some!

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  7. Both beautiful works of art, Kris! Normally, I would prefer the one with the shades of orange and red, but that bright yellow bouquet is so bright and cheerful! Love it.

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    1. The yellow vase is undeniably cheerful, Alison. And the Senna brings lots and lots of suphur butterflies, which is another bright spot.

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  8. Fabulous arrangements as always, Kris! I love yellow roses and your first arrangement feels so sunny and happy. Your peach 'Medallion' roses are very pretty too & look great in the second combination.

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  9. Glad to see your still creating multiples! I did a vase over the weekend, partially because there were elements in the garden I wanted to bring inside before Sunday's downpours ruined them, and partially for this meme. Then I ran out of time to photograph it so went with photos from Peter's garden instead. Oh well, I still enjoyed the arrangement!

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    1. I really had intended to keep the posts to one vase but, as usual, I got carried away. I'm so sorry we didn't get to see your vase!

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  10. The succulent arrangement still looks wonderful, what a pity to discard it. I am mad on that fabulous Cassia, what a gorgeous arrangement. I love the zinnias with the leachy rose too. You are so lucky having a second spring. Our gardens are still full of blooms but once we get a frost it will be the end.

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    1. I like to think of the succulent vase contents as having been recycled. Hopefully, all the cuttings will take now that they've got both soil and water to support their roots. That Cassia is fabulous - I'm on the look-out for another plant but, if I don't find it, I'll try rooting a cutting.

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  11. The yellow arrangement is delightful...also love your picture of the yellow butterfly. All your arrangements this week speak of your continuing good weather. I am sure that you will continue well into weeks, when the rest of us are really scratching around, or just giving up and have more time to admire yours.

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    1. I'm so excited about the sulphur butterflies in my garden, Noelle. I can't remember seeing any here before I put that plant in. Now I see them every day. I just wish they'd sit still for photos occasionally.

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  12. The Senna looks wonderful. Love the flowers as well as the foliage. Beautiful paired with your yellow roses.

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    1. The Senna's foliage is attractive but the plant becomes a beacon in the garden when in bloom, Susie.

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  13. The Senna is lovely and perfect for setting off those roses. What an apt name they have! Also love the second vase, and your analogy of a flamenco dancer! The zinnia is a gorgeous colour. It has been interesting following your succulents over the last few weeks. They are pretty amazing plants, aren't they!

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    1. I had a smattering of succulents at my last house, Cathy, but I can't say I was enamored with them. It took a drought and the hotter, sunnier conditions of my current garden to make me a complete convert.

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  14. I love the flouncy flamingo dancer! I also truly admire the vase with the yellow roses. You are blessed to have such lovely blooms this time of year.

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    1. Sadly, I must report the the flamenco dancer has lost her skirt. The roses didn't last any longer in the house than they may have outside, especially as our skies were partly clouded today.

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  15. Love the color combinations, Kris! Especially the Buttercream roses with the Senna - really brings a smile :D I think S. bicapsularis must be the one we tried and failed with about a year ago, but that may have been due to its being from the bargain table... Yours looks very happy and healthy and loaded with flowers!

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    1. I don't water my Senna much but as it sits along the fence, it may be getting a boost from my neighbor's irrigation system.

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