Sunday, November 16, 2014

Foliage Follow-up: More Please!

As we get closer to being ready to plant the area formerly occupied by lawn in the front yard, I've spent more time deliberating on my plant choices.  What's clear is that I need more foliage plants.  In compiling my wish list, I started by looking at what I already have.  In the sunnier area of the new space, I want to add more of these:

Abelia x grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope'

Alternanthera tenella

Duranta 'Gold Mound'

Pelargonium hortorum 'Mrs. Pollock'



In the shadier areas, I'm thinking of more:

Ageratum corymbosum, grown more for the foliage than the flowers

Asparagus densiflorus 'Sprengeri,' which is likely to spread on its own

Prostanthera ovalifolia 'Variegata' (even if it does tend to get leggy over time)



Although I'm not really ready to do any planting yet, that hasn't stopped me from buying plants.  Those selected specifically for their foliage include:

Leptospermum 'Copper Glow,' which is new to me

A wider view of Leptospermum 'Copper Glow,' which doesn't do it justice

Another Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder'

For comparison purposes, this is my existing Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder,' which is just starting to develop its winter color

More Lomandra longifolia 'Breeze'



I'm itching to start planting but that event is still probably 2 or more weeks away as we're still digging.

The neighbors have been speculating about what has been variously referred to as an archaeological dig and a burial ground



This foliage overview is my contribution to the monthly foliage follow-up sponsored by Pam at Digging to recognize the importance of foliage in our gardens.  Click here to see her post this month and to find links to other foliage-focused posts.


All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

20 comments:

  1. You can never go wrong with having more foliage in the garden Kris :) I like the Ageratum a lot btw, reminds me of small Persicaria leaves too.

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    1. The Ageratum corymbosum (which, at one time, the seller labeled as Eupatorium) is a great plant that looks good for most of the year.

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  2. Kris, I'm envious of your Ageratum corymbosum, nice colors. But I don't recommend asparagus fern here on three counts. 1) It's thorny and therefore painful to prune. 2) It's spread by birds and gets in everywhere they poop like under trees. 3) Fallen leaves have to be removed very carefully by hand; they don't sink through the dense foliage. See Digging/Pam's recommendation, but my 'Meyeri' spreads not at all.

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    1. I saw the exchange on the asparagus fern on Pam's page. I avoided the plant at our former house for many of the reasons you mention. I inherited the ones I have here but I haven't had any significant issues with them to date. That said, I won't actually plant more but I probably will allow the one I photographed to spread (as containing it isn't easy in any case). Mine don't seem to produce a lot of berries, which may be the reason I haven't seen the propagation by bird poop you mention.

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  3. Abelia 'Kaleidoscope' is a great choice. One of my favorite shrubs, mine is still flowering even after our freeze. I like the Ageratum corymbosum too. I may try to find that, even though it might be marginally hardy here.

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    1. I got my Ageratum corymbosum by mail order from Annie's Annuals & Perennials, Alison. It's not currently available (I checked) but I put myself on the wait list.

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  4. Good color on those leucadendron, very nice in a place where you don't get much fall color. I have that Lomandra and I don't remember seeing it written about much. It never seems to need watering and it stays green.

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    1. Lomandra has become my favorite grass-substitute, Shirley. With the 3 waiting to be planted, I think I have a dozen or thereabouts. It's definitely drought tolerant.

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  5. I love the variegated foliage. Looking at all your foliage plants makes me realize it is something my garden lacks. I need to think more about what I could use to remedy this.

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    1. Prostanthera is an Australian native and drought tolerant but, if you get temperatures below 25F, it may not be hardy for you. The Abelia may die back to the ground in hard frosts but it's supposed to come back as long as temperatures don't go below 0F. I like the variegated Erysimum linifolium too but can't speak to its winter hardiness.

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  6. Your burial ground is looking great and almost ready for all of the cool foliage plants you've bought for it. I've heard that bodies make great fertilizer...

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    1. Funny, I made a similar comment to the neighbor who commented on my "burial mound."

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  7. I believe that archeological digs are often burial grounds! You know I always love foliage, and you have made some great choices. 'Mrs. Pollock' and the ageratum are especially beautiful. I am looking forward to the completed project with no graves in sight!

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    1. No bodies - or other artifacts - have been discovered to date, Deb, unless you count nails, irrigation fitting odds and ends, sod netting, and lots and lots of rocks. The entire neighborhood was part of a rock quarry in the 1940s...

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  8. Hahaha, the burial ground/archaelogical dig comment. That large wilson's wonder is gorgeous. Your Lomandra longifolia looks lovely. Mine was transplanted (and not very carefully I might add - not by me) and has basically stayed the same size for a year or more. Perhaps it's still recovering.

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    1. I've noticed that some of mine took longer to fill out than others, Amy, presumably due to differences in cultural conditions. The good news is that none have died. I suspect yours will come through their transplant shock.

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  9. What interesting foliage. I love Leptospermum and I buy one from time to time. They are not hardy here and have to overwinter in the greenhouse. Even so they always die quite quickly. What sort of conditions do they like?
    Leucodendrons again! I just love them.
    I am looking forward to seeing your burial ground planted up.

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    1. The Leptospermum 'Copper Glow' is new to me but my understanding is that it likes the same conditions of the L. scoparium: full sun and limited water. My others are in my dry garden but I'm planning to put 'Copper Glow' in the front garden, which is irrigated on a more routine basis. Hopefully, I won't drown it.

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  10. Some great foliage plants you have there. I would like Lomandras, but where do you put them? What do they look good with?

    Best wishes for gettting the digging done so you can go on to the fun stuff.

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    1. I use Lomandra like an ornamental grass, Hooever Boo, even though it isn't a grass. I have them spread in various locations but I particularly like the ones I mixed with Grevillea, Nandina, Agapanthus, Abelia 'Kaleidoscope' and Gaillardia. They produce a maize-colored flower but it doesn't amount to much.

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