Friday, November 28, 2014

My favorite plant this week: Yucca 'Bright Star'

After admiring my Yucca 'Bright Star' this morning, as I do pretty much every time I walk through the backyard garden, it occurred to me that I've never featured this plant as one of my favorites.  A terrible omission on my part!  As Loree of danger garden is featuring her, now monthly, favorites feature today, it seemed a good time to rectify the situation.




I put in 3 plants in mid January of this year.  They've grown wider since but not appreciably taller.  At maturity, they're said to get 1-2 feet (30-60 cm) tall and 3-5 feet (1-5 meters) wide.

Yucca 'Bright Star' shortly after they were planted

My 3 'Bright Stars' today



They've always shown some pink - more than I generally see in the plants for sale in the local nurseries and garden centers.  However, the pink color is intensified now.  Could this be a response to the cooler nighttime temperatures?  Despite a few cool days, our daytime temperatures have been stuck in the upper 70s and low 80s (Fahrenheit).

Photo from May 2014

Photo from September 2014

Close-up taken this morning



The history of this plant is interesting.  It was discovered in the UK in 2000 by Albert Timothy Crowther on what was thought to be a Yucca gloriosa and was reproduced through tissue culture.  Although initially sold as a variant of Yucca gloriosa, it's now thought to be related to Yucca recurvifolia, a native of the Southeast United States.

Whatever it's origin, it's perfect for my garden with its low water needs and ability to withstand high summer temperatures.  The raccoons avoid it too, which is an added plus.  According to San Marcos Growers, it's hardy to 0-10F (minus 12 to minus 17C).

Yucca 'Bright Star' is my current favorite and my contribution to Loree's favorites round-up at danger garden.  Earlier favorites featured this month included 2 drought tolerant succulent selections: Echeveria cante (featured on November 20th) and Dyckia Marnier-Lapostellii (featured November 7th).  You can see Loree's favorites wrap-up here.


All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

22 comments:

  1. Oh, you are so lucky that yours have colored up so beautifully! I love this plant too, I have three in my gravel garden that are thriving, but they never get more than a little pink on the tips, and during the winter they often get ugly brown blemishes.

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    1. The strong pink color in these has really surprised me. None of those I see in the garden centers have that depth of color.

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  2. It's hard not to love this very striking plant. Hope it continues to do well for you :)

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    1. This is one of the few plants the raccoons avoid, Jessica - maybe it would work with sheep too!

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  4. Great color, I'd love to find this one in my area and it's hardy enough to weather our occasional deep freeze.

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    1. I hope you can find it in your area, Shirley.

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  5. I can see why they'd be favorites - that pink is absolutely stunning. Your specimens are clearly happy-happy in their current setting. It's no wonder that make you happy-happy too.

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    1. My only problem is finding plants to complement them (and their growing conditions) in that area of the border. Nothing else I've put there has done as well.

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  6. Wow, you're growing this so well! I've bought them in nurseries with that amount of pink on them but they never reproduce it in my garden, well..that is if they even live. (I've lost a couple, I think it's just too wet for them)

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  7. A very pretty yucca! They look very happy.

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  8. It is very interesting to look at your pictures from the nurseries you been to.
    So many plants I've never seen before.
    Best regards
    Mariana

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    1. I doubt you could grow this one in your climate, Mariana.

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  9. One of my all-time favorites also. The oldest is maybe 30"x42" now. They do not pink up at all--perhaps too warm where they are on the south facing slope, with zero shade.

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    1. Mine do get a little shade. Maybe I'll experiment and add some to the sunny front garden to see if I can determine what makes them pink-up.

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  10. This is a beautiful plant, and I am excited to learn it is a relative of a southeastern native. It may do well for me! I am always a fan of plants with color like this. Yours seem very happy!

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  11. This really does have a striking colour, I think it would be my favourite too. It seems the perfect plant being drought tolerant, not minding high temperatures and putting up with some pretty low temperatures. I will have to look out for this one.

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    1. I expect they'd like your climate too, Christina, especially as they can handle a bit of a chill.

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