Saturday, March 15, 2014

Bloom Day - March 2014

Everything's coming up roses this March Bloom Day in Southern California.  Well, that's actually a gross exaggeration.  I don't have many roses and only a portion of those I do have are blooming but, because they're getting an early start this year, I thought I'd let them lead this month's Bloom Day parade.

'California Dreamin'

'Joseph's Coat' climber 

'Joseph's Coat' in its glory, blooming against the stone of the chimney

'Medallion'



Now that I've dispensed with the flashiest blooms in my garden, I'll proceed to the biggest surprises.

Planted shortly after we moved in 3 years ago and transplanted once afterwards, Helleborus 'Phoebe' has finally bloomed!

A division of an unnamed Alstroemeria from the backyard I planted in the front border a year ago has bloomed

The California poppies I planted from seed in the vegetable garden last year have shown up a month early this year - so far, all the blooms are this creamy pink color

Hippeastrum 'La Paz,' transplanted in a bed along the street last year, has bloomed - I'm hoping that these will establish colonies in time

The Phalaenopsis my husband bought to commemorate our anniversary last year has rebloomed despite getting nothing more than haphazard watering during the past year



Since last month's Bloom Day, a large number of plants have joined the parade of flowers.

Acanthus mollis ('Summer Beauty' I think) has produced several bloom spikes

Aeonium arboreum

Ajuga hybrid 'Mint Chip,' a dwarf variety, grows between paving stones in the side yard

The first blooms of Aquilegia 'Spring Magic' have appeared

Calibrachoa 'Tequila Sunrise,' planted in early winter, has returned to bloom

Ceanothus (unknown variety)

Euryops 'Sonnenchein,' a dwarf variety, planted last spring

Hemerocallis ('Elizabeth Salter' I think)

The first of the Spanish bluebells (Hyacinthoides hispanica) to bloom

Iris douglasiana (no ID on variety)

A mix of annual Linaria

Purple Ranunculus

This "purple" Ranunculus bloomed red



I purchased a few new bloomers this month as well.

A new, small-flowered Cymbidium, picked up at the local botanic garden

Hibiscus trionum, also picked up at the local botanic garden

Dianthus barbatus 'Heart Attack'



Some of the plants featured last year at this time, like the Camellia hybrid, the Hong Kong orchid tree, and the daffodils, have already come close to finishing their spring bloom cycle this March, hurried on their way by our wicked Santa Ana winds perhaps.  However, many of the plants I featured in last month's Bloom Day post continue to march on.  Here are a few of those:

Anemone

Erysimum

Hebe 'Patty's Purple' with Geranium 'Tiny Monster' and an Osteospermum with spoon-shaped petals

A mix of blue and white Osteospermum with spoon-shaped and regular petals

Osteospermum eklonis '3D Silver' and pink Alstroemeria

Osteospermum 'Serity Purple'

Papaver nudicaule

Phlomis fruticosa

Sparaxis tricolor



Spring is already giving way to summer here in southern California as temperatures climb up toward 90F (32C).  Despite the pleasantness of the warm days, I'd gladly exchange them for a bit more rain.

That's it for my Bloom Day review.  Please visit Carol, the gracious host of the Bloom Day meme, at May Dreams Gardens for a view of what's blooming in other areas of the US and elsewhere in the world.

26 comments:

  1. So many flowers and colors! And I agree, more rain would be good...

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    1. I think we need to start a weekly rain dance, Renee!

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  2. Wow, so much in bloom! I'm still dreaming of summer. I can't wait 'til my gardens are as colorful as yours. You have so many beautiful blooms!

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    1. Thanks Jennifer! As we're already getting 90F temps, it feels as though summer's already here.

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  3. I wish I could export our rain all over the place, it's unfair to hoard it all up here in the PNW. We've had so much recently, a nearby river was above flood stage this past week. Amazing that you have so many flowers, but especially the daylily.

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    1. Too bad we can't make your water export system a reality, Alison!

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  4. I didn't know there was a dwarf euryops! I have seed for the Hibiscus trionum -- I'd much rather pick up a plant since there's hasn't been much luck with seed so far. And I much prefer your Summer Beauty acanthus to the straight mollis kinds. Wasn't sure it liked SoCal, so am very glad to see yours in bloom!

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    1. I got the dwarf Euryops at Roger's last May, Denise - I haven't seen it since. The Hibiscus was on the sale table at South Coast Botanic Garden - I bought it on a whim and I hope it's not the weed some people describe. This variety of Acanthus is hardier than those I grew at our old house - it bloomed almost continuously last year and can handle more sun than those I previously grew.

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  5. Kris, you always have so many stunning plants in bloom. Everything is coming up roses with you. I love that Hippeastrum and your new Cymbidium. The Ajuga looks so good growing amongst your paving stones. Everything looks fabulous.

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    1. Thanks, Chloris. I wasn't sure about that Ajuga when I put it in but, so far, it has worked well in the spaces between the stepping stones.

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  6. The roses are stunning. Making a note here to have Iceland Poppies next year, as I always intend. Isn't it wonderful that Orchids are not as delicate as everybody thinks?

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    1. I agree, Jean. Many orchids, especially Cymbidium, are pretty easy - all they want is a little bit of fertilizer and they'll bloom for a month or more. The Phalaenopsis didn't even get its fertilizer boost until after the buds appeared.

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  7. As always, I am impressed by the variety of blooms you have. Your roses are beautiful! Does your garden ever have a down time? You mentioned a need for more rain. We have heard of the drought in California, but your garden seems hardly affected!

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    1. The closest thing we have to a down period in the garden is late summer when temperatures make planting anything dicey and dry winds can kill even well-established plants if you're not vigilant. At present, the governor has asked for a 20% voluntary reduction in water use, which I'm trying to accommodate by cutting back water to our slope and other controls. Reducing the amount of lawn has helped some. If the limits become tougher and mandatory, the garden will suffer more than it has thus far.

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  8. Thank you for reminding me about annual Linaria..have not grown these in a few years-they are so cute ! Happy Bloomday !

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    1. I hadn't grown the annual Linaria in years either - I just happened to spy 2 pony-packs on one of my nursery runs and picked them up on a whim. I'm glad I did and I'll look for it again next year.

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  9. Your garden looks fabulous--that Hellebore in particular is very choice. Enjoyed your post!

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    1. I actually did a little happy dance when I saw that Hellebore had finally bloomed!

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  10. So many blooms! And roses already!!! Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. This is what Bloom Day is all about!

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    1. The roses are definitely early this year. I guess they like the unseasonably warm days we've had!

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  11. I just knew your garden would not disappoint this bloom day Kris. It's odd to see a hellebore flowering at the same time as many plants we associate with summer.
    Gorgeous roses, the climber really stands out against the wall. All beautiful!

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    1. It's just odd to see a Hellebore in flower here, period, Angie! Those are the 1st blooms in 3 years.

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  12. I lived in San Diego for 20 years, it's great to get to bask in the warmth and familiar flowers a little. The roses look so pretty, they won't be here until the end of May, with the daylilies. But we do get to enjoy the gradual succession of the many spring bulbs and flowers, and cooler summers.;-)

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    1. I'd love the rain and the cooler summers of the northwest, Hannah - I just couldn't get my husband to move there.

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    2. P.S. I tried 2x to post a comment on your blog but kept receiving an error message.

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  13. So many beautiful flowers already! I am especially entranced by the Osteospermum and poppies.

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