Thursday, January 16, 2014

Foliage Follow-up - January 2014


Even in January, foliage is already taking a backseat to floral color in my garden.  Flowers that normally arrive in spring are already making an appearance and, with temperatures above 80F (27C) all this week, it feels as though we're skipping rapidly toward summer.  But there are a few foliage standouts to share.

2 more Abelia x grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope' were added to my garden in December - the bright variegated foliage can light up an area all on its own

This Agave 'Blue Glow' was acquired in a 6 inch pot in October and I could swear it has already doubled in size - I expected it to grow faster than the 2 I have in pots but the degree of difference surprised me

This Arthropodium cirratum (Renga Lily) has become huge - I think it could swallow up a small child.  I'll divide it in the fall.

Carex testacea (orange New Zeland sedge) is one of the plants adding a glow to my side yard

I'm enamored with this Crassula lycopodiodes, which I bought on a whim to line the edge of the patio in the side yard.  It's a good thing I like it as even the smallest pieces root nearly instantaneously. 

Pelargonium 'Indian Dunes' demurely peeking through the foliage of Lomandra longifolia 'Breeze'

Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-Star' performs best with morning sun and afternoon shade, which it gets in the border running along our living/dining room windows

New growth on the Xylosma congestum hedge running behind our backyard border



These are my contributions to Foliage Follow-up, hosted monthly by Pam at Digging.  Please visit her here to find more January foliage highlights.

16 comments:

  1. Drooling over you Agave 'Blue Glow', stunning!

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  2. I have had that Abelia for several years now and it is wonderful. Flowers for hummingbirds too, eventually. You have made some beautiful choices for foliage.

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    1. Thanks, Hoover Boo. Although I have a few varieties of Abelia, 'Kaleidscope' is hands down my favorite.

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  3. Your Agave and Arthropodium cirratum are amazing plants...great and interesting foliage!

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    1. I'm not sure why the Arthropodium isn't more popular, Lee. In addition to the attractive foliage, it produces lovely sprays of flowers in spring, it handles both sun and shade conditions, it's moderately drought tolerant and it divides easily - my garden is slowly being taken over by it.

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  4. That Abelia grows well here too! Alas, my Agave 'Blue Glow' will always live in a pot. After seeing so many beautiful agaves in California growing so happily in the ground, I feel a little guilty for keeping collection in pots where they'll never grow to their full potential. I have an urge to drive them all south and set them free! Your Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-Star' is gorgeous and a new plant to me.

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    1. I can entirely understand the decision to keep the agaves in pots, Peter, given that you must haul them inside during winter to ensure their survival. I have to say, though, that I was really surprised just how fast 'Blue Glow' took off when planted in the ground.

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  5. I never think about them on my own...but I'm so very drawn to those Zonal Pelargoniums...so charming!

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    1. I like the zonal Pelargoniums for their foliage - sometimes the flowers can be a little off-putting but, if they provide a discordant note, I just clip them off.

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  6. Any garden growing a plant which could swallow a small child is doing something right in my book...

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    1. It's a remarkable plant in all respect, Loree.

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  7. Så många häftiga, färggranna och vackra blommor i dom senaste inläggen!!
    Hälsningar
    Mariana

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  8. I love that you have green in your garden. :o) I have brown, brown, and more brown. You really have a lot of lush growth.

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  9. Ha ha, laughing over Loree's comment. The 'Blue Glow' agave is most drool-worthy, I think, but I'm loving that Renga Lily, and the Pelargonium and Carex are particularly attractive too.

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