Monday, October 27, 2014

In a Vase on Monday: Pretty in Pink

This week, there are finally enough Camellia sasanqua blossoms to cut for a vase.  And there was no difficulty in finding flowers to complement their pink color, even though my garden relies more on yellow, orange, and blue than pink.  My garden is rebounding as temperatures cool.

Front view

Back view



I'm glad I started with a good-sized vase because, when I was done, it was stuffed full.  Here's what I included:

  • Camellia sasanqua (no ID)
  • Cuphea ignea 'Starfire Pink'
  • Eustoma grandiflorum 'Echo White' (aka Lisianthus)
  • Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl'
  • Lobularia maritima (aka sweet alyssum)
  • Pentas lanceolata, 4 varieties
  • Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus'


The mass of dark pink Camellia sasanqua, planted along the side of the house facing the vegetable garden, came with the house

Cuphea 'Starfire Pink' makes a great filler in a vase - and the hummingbirds absolutely love it

The white Eustoma is making another appearance after hunkering down during the heat of summer

2 of the 4 varieties of Pentas lanceolata are shown in close-up here with a stem of rosemary



My biggest decision with this vase was where to put it.  There's not a lot of pink inside the house either.  I tried it first in the dining area.

This stone wall is the back of the living room fireplace - the open cavity to the right is part of what was constructed as an indoor barbecue when this 1950s-era house was built



Not bad but as the cat likes to jump up and sleep in the alcove on the right, the placement felt like an accident waiting to happen.  So I moved the vase to the fireplace mantle in the master bedroom.




Cathy at Rambling in the Garden hosts this weekly meme.  Visit her to see what she's arranged to celebrate Monday and to find links to the creations of other participating gardeners.


All material © 2012-2014 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

16 comments:

  1. Love these vibrant pinks Kris. The perfect combination of flower forms. This is my favourite vase so far. As ever you tempt me with flowers, I am considering a Camellia sasanqua for a pot on the wisteria-shaded terrace, I'd like mostly greens during the summer to add to the cool feeling but some bright colour in autumn would be lovely.

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    1. I find the Cameliia sasanqua are much easier than the C. japonica here, Christina. I hope they work for you too!

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  2. What a perfect way to start out the week. Gorgeous.

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    1. The vase meme is a happy way to start the week, Jenny!

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  3. Such an early Camellia, and a nice contemporary backdrop it has too :)

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    1. It's an old house by Los Anageles standards but the mid-century moderns are considered stylish again and, like you, I lean toward minimalism when it comes to decoration.

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  4. How pretty! I love the Camellia and that lovely Pentas, I am so envious every time I see it. I love the Cuphea too. You always have such fabulous flowers in your vases that we can' t grow here.

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    1. It always startles me when I hear that something can't grow in the UK, Chloris - I thought everything grows there. Oh well, you can grow peonies, while I've failed time and time again.

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  5. Kris I adore the bright pinks and the rosemary really made it perfect...and that vase is wonderful...a perfect arrangement. I like where you placed it.

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    1. Thanks, Donna! I'm not sure my husband has noticed the vase, even though his favorite reading spot is just below.

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  6. I wouldn't be able to get a thing done. That is a mesmerizing combination. The pinks glow.

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  7. Breathtaking. I am typically very hesitant to cut flowers and bring them indoors. I always think blooms will last longer on the plant than cut, I feel bad "robbing" pollinators when we are in the midst of such a longstanding drought, and my cats always seem to find a way to nibble on arrangement leaves no matter where I put the vase. All that said? I could easily get used to having a gorgeous arrangement indoors if I was assured results like yours.

    You not only have a green thumb lady, but you also have a keen eye when it comes to placement and balance of your cut flowers. Standing O for this one!

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    1. Thanks Deb! I understand the hesitancy to cut flowers - I avoided doing so in the past myself (for similar reasons) but, even with as much time as I spend outside, I also spend a fair amount of time inside and it's nice to see reminders of my horticultural efforts there too. Another benefit is that it allows me to see plants in a new context, providing ideas for future planting configurations.

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  8. Beautiful arrangement, and the back view is just as lovely as the front! My 50's era house also has an indoor barbecue, made from very similar stone, it looks like. Must have been the "in" thing back then.

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  9. Lovely as always, Kris! I especially like this arrangement because it seems so fresh and new. The colors speak spring to me in a time when so much outside here is showing the warm colors of autumn decline.

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