Monday, June 14, 2021

In a Vase on Monday: Sprinting into summer

If weather reports are accurate, Southern California and a large portion of the US Southwest are going to get toasted this week.  Up to this point our usual June Gloom along the coast has prevented midday temperatures from soaring but it sounds as though we're not going to get a lot of help there this week.  Over the past few days, I've given selected sections of my garden a deep soak in an effort to sidestep any serious repercussions but the severity of heatwaves is never predictable.  I briefly considered cutting everything in sight for "In a Vase on Monday" but I reined myself in before I went crazy.

My first arrangement was inspired by the wild carrot that took me by surprise in late April.  I'd completely forgotten that I'd sown seeds of Daucus carota 'Dara' late last year and, when the seedlings first appeared, I didn't recognize them.  Now, the largest plant is nearly as tall as I am.

I felt I needed a flower that played off the burgundy color of the umbellifer to serve as a focal point but, when my first choice didn't do the job, I decided to cut one of the daylilies that has been blooming with abandon, recognizing that it won't have a long vase life.  I'll either cut another daylily tomorrow, or simply let the wild carrot flowers stand on their own.

The flowers of the burgundy ivy geranium (Pelargonium peltatum) I'd originally eyed as a focal point were relegated to the back of the vase as they're already beginning to shatter

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Daucus carota 'Dara', Hemerocallis 'Spanish Harlem', Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', Leucadendron 'Jubilee Crown', Pandorea jasminoides, and Pelargonium peltatum

The second arrangement was driven by a desire to save some blooms before the heat pushes them over the edge.  When I unceremoniously yanked all my sweet pea vines last week, the three foxglove plants they'd shielded from the sun in my cutting garden began to droop rather sadly.  

The stems of Coriandrum sativum (aka cilantro/coriander) I used as a filler were wilted a bit when I took these photos but they've since rebounded, as they always do.  I didn't sow any seeds of cilantro this year but, as it's popping up nearly everywhere I spread my homemade compost, I clearly didn't need to.  

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left are Abelia grandiflora 'Edward Goucher', Arthropodium cirratum, Coriandrum sativum, Digitalis purpurea, Nigella 'African Bride', and Scabiosa columbaria 'Flutter Rose Pink'.  (Included, but not shown in close up, is a lavender Pelargonium peltatum)

Hopefully, there will still be plenty of flowers to cut next week!  For more IAVOM creations this week, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

20 comments:

  1. As you say, the severity of heatwaves is never predictable, but you still know to expect your JUne Gloom and some degree of heatwave at some time. Thank heavens for the temperate UK climate, I say! I am always intrigued by the varety of the materail you put in your vases, and I especially like your second one this week with the foxglove scabious and nigella. Hoe you and your garden don't frazzle in the coming weeks!

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    1. The "June Gloom" always shows up at some point during June but we never know how long it'll hang around on an individual day. We got a little bit of a marine layer this morning but it was gone by 8am today, too early to have much of an effect. Occasionally, we also get "May Gray" and, less frequently still, "No Sky July" and "Fogust" but I don't expect much of that through the balance of the summer.

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  2. It always amazes me that despite the climate you manage to grow so many wonderful flowers. It sure testifies to your gardening prowess. The Daucus is pretty impressive in that vase. Keep cool this coming week as much as possible.

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    1. Thanks Noelle. It helps a LOT that I'm able to irrigate my garden regularly. At some point, I fear that the taps will be turned off - or, if not actually shut off, we'll come under new, more rigorous water restrictions.

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  3. Mother Nature has given my garden a deep soak before the heat comes later this week. We've gotten just over an inch in the last few days. Pretty amazing, that's more rain than all of April and May combined! I feel lucky.

    Your Daucus carota 'Dara' are fab!

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    1. An inch plus of rain sounds like a real gift from my perspective, Loree. I 'm not sure we got an inch of rain from any single storm we've had since our "water year" began on October 1st.

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  4. I love Queen Anne's Lace and did not know there is a cultivar. It was worth the short vase life to have the burgundy punch from the daylily. I am amazed your foxgloves have lasted this long. Hope you get a short toast.

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    1. A brief, light toasting would be a relief, Amelia. We peaked just under 90F this afternoon but tomorrow is supposed to be the worst day of this heatwave, with a very gradual cooldown into the mid-80s by the weekend.

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  5. 'Dara' is a winner! Your vases are lovely - hope the heat doesn't decimate the garden too much.

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  6. I've wanted to grow Daucus for ages, and even have a seed packet. So now I will sow them for sure: perfect for mixing in with others!

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    1. I thought the Daucus seedlings were weeds when they first appeared, Libby! I'm hoping they don't really become such in coming years ;)

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  7. Yes, summer is coming along too fast, as it always does. I wish I could slow down more during spring and summer, but they always seem to pass much faster than the other seasons. Beautiful vases! The colors in that first one are really special!

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    1. Summer feels too long a season here, Beth, stretching from late May well into October. Winter is practically speaking non-existent here but I wish our "cool season" (November-early April) was longer and not as frequently punctuated with heat spells.

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  8. I love your color combos, as always. Daucus as tall as you must be quite the sight!
    The forecast I've been seeing for the SW looks pretty dire. Extreme weather is always scary to me. I hope your proximity to the ocean helps a wee bit at least. Stay cool and hydrated!

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    1. Yes, not to borrow trouble but I think it's likely that this is going to be an unpleasant summer. I heard about one fire already earlier today but hopefully they got a handle on it. The idiots are already out with fireworks even though Independence Day is still weeks away :(

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  9. These are glorious. Love reading about all the flowers you grow, such a variety. I bought Daucus carota to plant (not a named cultivar) but got cold feet. Would you recommend it? Is it easy to pull out?

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    1. Daucus carota does produce a healthy tap root, Susie, but I was able to thin the clump of seedlings I had without much trouble even through some were 5-6 inches tall at that point. While the so-called Ammi majus 'Dara' I previously grew didn't seem to self-seed, it remains to be seen if Daucus carota 'Dara' does so and, if so, if the seeding is rampant. I'm not entirely convinced the two species aren't really the same plant - my seed packet was labeled Ammi 'Dara' with Daucus carota in italics below but some people swear they're different plants.

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  10. Those dusky reds are very attractive. I am going to have to try that daucus myself. Great vases. Really love the first one.

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    1. The Daucus requires very little in terms of an investment of time for a reliable reward. It's definitely worth trying.

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