Monday, June 21, 2021

In a Vase on Monday: Funky and Frilly

I wasn't at all sure my first arrangement was going to look like much but earlier this week, when I nearly tripped over the single 'Purple 'Romagna' artichoke in my back border, I decided I "needed" to use it in a floral arrangement.  I'd actually planned to do so more than a month ago when I first saw the purple choke but I forgot about it and, when I next noticed it, it was more green than purple.  This week it was glowing a ruby-magenta color.  Some of the plants I'd envisioned pairing with it were disappointing but, overall, I'm satisfied with the arrangement even if the choke and its foliage stabbed me several times before I was done.

The arrangement deserved an unusual vase and this one, given to me as a gift a couple of years ago, fit the bill

The arrangement required a few touches of white to lift it up a bit, which was supplied by the first sprays of white flowers on Leptospermum 'Copper Glow' and two Renga Lily stems (Arthropodium cirratum)

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Allium sphaerocephalon (aka drumstick allium), Monarda 'Peter's Purple', Arthropodium cirratum, Gomphrena decumbens 'Itsy Bitsy', foliage and flowers of Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', and Cynara scolymus 'Purple Romagna'

My second arrangement is more conventional.  It made use of the Agapanthus blooms that are currently plentiful here but the inspiration was actually provided by two Delphinium stems that made it through last week's heatwave in my well-watered cutting garden.  While much of California and the US Southwest did indeed sizzle under the "heat dome" last week, my area got off relatively easy.  We peaked at 93F (33.9C) on Tuesday before settling into the low-mid 80s for the rest of the week, thanks to our persistent morning marine layer.  People complain about our "June Gloom" but I love it and I won't be at all sad if we get a "No Sky July" and a "Fogust" too.  After an exceptionally dry rainy season, we need all the moisture we can get.

The ruffled Shasta daisies gave the arrangement a little extra something

Back view

Top view: While photographing the individual elements in this arrangement, I was struck by how similar the innermost flowers of Orlaya grandiflora (Minoan lace) are when compared to Coriandrum sativum (aka cilantro/coriander) 

Top row: blue and white Agapanthus and variegated Helichrysum petiolare
Middle row: Coriandrum sativum, Orlaya grandiflora, and Leucanthemum x superbum
Bottom row: dark and light blue stems of Delphinium 'Pacific Giants' mix and Salvia 'Mystic Spires'

For more IAVOM posts, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.


All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

32 comments:

  1. Both arrangements are lovely, Kris. I love the blue/lilac colored though, simply because those tones are my favorite. I also love that you have so many different textures. Just lovely.

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    1. Thanks Angie. I love the restful quality of cool blue and white arrangements.

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  2. I spy Itsy Bitsy! My favourite girl in your garden, which is quite a sweeping statement really, considering the fantastic array of flowers you give us each week! They are all lovely of course and it is actually quite hard to favour one vase over another! Two more beauties this week Kris! Thank you! Amanda

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    1. 'Itsy Bitsy' has lots of fans, Amanda. My only criticism of the plant is that its flowers can easily get tangled in the process of arranging them ;)

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  3. Inspired! Love the use of the artichoke. The calming blues are lovely too! Happy summer!

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    1. When I missed the earlier window to cut the artichoke when it was purple, I thought I'd wait until it was in full bloom but the ruby color surrounding a tan center struck me as even more unusual.

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  4. The arrangement with the artichoke goes extremely well with that vase! Perfect pairing.

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    1. Yes, the vase was perfect. I'm glad I remembered it.

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  5. Artichoke for the win! I love how you used it and that vase is just perfect.

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    1. I was rather pleased with the pairing too, Loree.

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  6. Love your pretties today. Even if they are sharp, the Artichoke reminds me of the Bromeliads in my garden. I have to look into if they are related. The vase looks great with artichoke and the colors. I am amazed your Delphiniums made it through all that heat! Hoping for a Fogust, still laughing at that one..

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    1. As you raised the issue, Amelia, I looked into what family of plants artichokes belong to. They're considered thistles, which belong to Asteraceae family.

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  7. Oh, that artichoke is delightful, Kris, I guess it's rather ornamental, is it? Also love the foliage of Leptospermum. Both vases are a sight to behold...and yes, I wish you could pop over for a summer lunch, wouldn't that be nice :D

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    1. Thanks Annette. I've let the artichokes on my back slope flower this year rather than picking them to eat as I've done in the past. When its hot as well as very dry, they move to the flower stage very quickly.

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  8. You did well, Kris, and the vases are perfect for their bouquets. Hope your summer wishes come true.

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    1. The marine layer really is a terrific benefit in keeping our daytime temperatures down, although hoping it'll hold through August is probably a pipe dream. We have had some foggy August mornings in the past, though!

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  9. Funky and frilly--and refreshingly cooling to the eyes, esp. the second bouquet. Just what I needed after our recent heat wave. 106°F in our garden on Saturday!

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    1. I'm sorry to hear that, Gerhard. I'd feared that our temperatures could climb into the stratosphere like that but we were lucky. The inland valley area I grew up in had temperatures in the same range as yours. It's looking like we'll have another tough summer.

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  10. Blue and white, yes, yes. Delphiniums, amazing. Fringe-y Shastas, a definite plus.

    Heat wasn't too bad here either, just that one day in the 90's. We actually had a couple that stayed @ 75. Luck won't hold forever--but a No Sky July or Fogust would be a dream come true, no?

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    1. Let's think positive, HB! I recall deeply foggy mornings in August when we were going through our remodel in 2019. It could happen.

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  11. Oh yes, the artichoke really adds a lot to the first arrangement. And I love the colors of both arrangements. Lovely!

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    1. Thanks Beth. I originally planted 3 or more of that particular artichoke in my back border in late 2017. Only one plant remains and this was its first and only choke this year. Fingers crossed it comes back next year - the plants on my back slope (a different variety) have returned for 3+ years.

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  12. Love the use of the artichoke! Superb arrangements as always :)

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    1. Thanks guys. Sometimes you just need to change things up a little.

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  13. Beautiful pair of arrangements, Kris! I love that vibrant artichoke. Can you still eat it or is it purely ornamental? The whole arrangement is like a fountain bursting out of the vase, love it!
    The blue and white vase is lovely, too, so full of frilly, frothy flowers!

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    1. The artichoke was edible back in May when I first saw it but it was already well on its way to flowering when I cut it for my vase on Sunday, so it was no longer edible (by my standards anyway!) then. It's actually starting to flower now in the vase!

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  14. The artichoke is a fascinating flower. And your second vase is also full of lovely things. All the fluffy whites and blues make me think of rainshowers! Wish I could send you some.

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    1. I wish you could too, Cathy! We're used to a long dry stretch from late April through October but our earlier winter rainy season was a bust, leaving us dry even at the start this year.

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  15. I like the two arrangements especially with the Monarda and Allium and the little Cynara dancing all around at the base.

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    1. Thanks Jason. I'm very fond of that Monarda, the first variety I've ever managed to grow with any level of success here.

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  16. I'm so pleased that you are getting some 'June Gloom' Kris and hope that the rest of the summer is as palatable. A beautiful second vase of blues and whites. I've not heard of orlaya grandiflora being called 'Minoan Lace' before now. I wonder where the name comes from. The flowers are most lacy indeed but I don't understand the reference to Minoan.

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    1. Although generally easier to remember and pronounce, I don't care for common names, Anna. They're so random and inconsistent, especially across countries. Supposedly, Orlaya grandiflora hails from Crete, the center on the Minoan civilization during the Bronze Age. I don't imagine there are actually many Americans that have even heard of the Minoans - or even the Bronze Age ;)

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