Monday, April 12, 2021

In a Vase on Monday: Pretty in Peach - and Pink

Cheered by my relative success in growing a mix of snapdragon plugs this year without a touch of rust, I ordered three more plants in February from my favorite mail order nursery.  Unfortunately, as our weather has warmed, I can already see signs that my snapdragons may not hold on for much longer so I cut the first flowering stems of the new plants for an arrangement this week.  There are already touches of rust showing on the new snapdragon plants.  I've removed the affected leaves and sprayed with neem oil but it remains to be seen whether that's enough.

In November 2019, I sowed seeds of Digitalis 'Dalmatian Peach' but the plants that emerged last year were small and didn't bloom.  This year, I've got my first bloom spike, which I used as a centerpiece here but it's been upstaged by the snapdragons and Grevilleas.

Back view: I added one stem of the still rust-free bronze snapdragon that was part of the mix I planted earlier.  The individual blooms of the new 'Chantilly Bronze' and 'Chantilly Peach' snapdragons are markedly larger.

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', noID bronze Antirrhinum majus, A. 'Chantilly Bronze', A. 'Chantilly Peach', Digitalis purpurea 'Dalmatian Peach', Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream', G. 'Superb', Ranunculus californicus and, in the middle, my favorite spring prop, a mouse gliding along on the back of a butterfly


I'd planned to go with purple and lavender flowers for a second arrangement but the bearded Iris I'd targeted as my centerpiece was already past its prime so I shifted my color scheme to pink.

The Centranthus ruber growing on my back slope are blooming a little later than usual but they're rapidly picking up speed.  I guessed correctly that they'd mesh well with the pink Scabiosa growing in my front garden.

Back view: White snapdragons freshened the mix.  As filler material, I cut stems of self-seeded Coriandrum sativum (aka cilantro/coriander) that's already bolted, only to have it wilt dramatically.  I seared the stem ends in hot water and I trusted past experience that they'd perk up after several hours in water, which they did.

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: noID Alstroemeria, white Antirrhinum majus, Centranthus ruber, Coriandrum sativum, Pelargonium 'Lemona', and Scabiosa columbaria 'Flutter Rose Pink'


For more IAVOM creations, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

28 comments:

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    1. I'm particularly fond of peachy colors, Phillip.

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  2. The color combinations are just perfect in each vase, Kris. Gorgeous! I wanted snapdragons but I thinks it's getting too late here to plant them. Getting too warm. Yours are beautiful.

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    1. It was probably too late here when I planted those last 3 snapdragons in late February, Susie. The garden centers still have plenty of plants to tempt you, though.

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  3. Interesting to read that you ahve used neem oil. I bought some at the end of last year to use particularly on saw fly - what have you used it on, and do you find ut helps? SEeing your first vase reminds how much you seem to like this colour combination, the peaches and complemnatary greenery...I think I will always assicate it with you! The white antirrhinum in your second vase look stunning, and soften the assorted pinks in your vase - such a great combination. Thanks for sharing

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    1. I'd previously only used the neem oil once and that was to treat a serious problem with what I recall were thrips on 3 shrubs in one particular area of my garden but it's said to work on rust as well. I used it just on the bases of the 2 affected snapdragons and was careful not to spray any other plants in the interest of avoiding impact to harmless insects.

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  4. Lovely colour combinations as always. Snapdragons do really well in our garden so interesting to hear that they are susceptible to rust. Wondering about the NEEM though as I thought it was more pesticide than fungicide.

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    1. Neem oil is also supposed to to useful in treating rust but that could be hype, Elaine. I used it minimally to avoid impacting insects to the extent possible. I rarely use any pesticides or fungicides.

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  5. Two lovely vases of flowers. The second vase always makes me smile with the pattern to suggest flower stems. I wonder if others have mentioned this? The Scabiosa columbaria 'Flutter Rose Pink' is tunning.

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    1. I don't recall anyone making that comment about the vase, Noelle, but I can understand why you see it that way. My mother bought that vase as a gift to me on her one and only trip to Finland, where her parents were born, so I view is as a memento of my heritage.

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  6. Both arrangements are luscious. Peach Foxglove is a new color to me..love it, though. I hope the neem allows you to enjoy the Snaps..I use a lot of neem here.

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    1. I've previously used neem only to treat a severe insect infestation but the seller claims it works on rust too. We shall see.

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  7. Ah ha! I spy a foxglove, and what a pretty colour! The snapdragons are gorgeous, but your lovely foxglove has stolen my heart in that arrangement! I do love them. And the scabious and pelargonium particularly in your second arrangement are also gorgeous! It's all lovely - as always! Amanda

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    1. I'm fond of foxgloves too, although I've only really had any success with them in my cutting garden, as they get the water they need there. They quickly perished in the drier sections of my garden.

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  8. Peach is my favorite color. So very lovely!

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    1. Peach is a very approachable color - I have dreams of creating a bed combining peach and pale lavender flowering plants.

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  9. How brave of you to cut your first digitalis flower - not sure I could have done the same. It's only with the abundance of flowers when I find it easy to cut. Silly, huh?
    Too bad about the rust returning ... I wonder if Bordeaux mix might help? But it seems that fungus must be handled at the spore stage, and being invisible we don't see the damage until the fruiting bodies emerge months later. Which reminds me, I need to spray my phlox for powdery mildew!
    Beautiful arrangements as always, Kris. Hope your week is a good one!

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    1. I've told myself that it's silly to have a "cutting garden" if I don't feel free to cut what's in it, Eliza, but I admit I did hesitate about cutting that foxglove stem. My hope is that'll promote the production of new stems. With respect to the rust, I think you're right - by the time you see it developing, it's usually too late to stop it. I did removed the affected leaves before spraying.

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  10. Splendid colors in both vases as spring is marching on with vigor. Pelargonium 'Lemona' caught my eye! I do love Pelagronium, especially when I rub the leafs and get a whiff of that strong scent.

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  11. I'm sure that you must have been so disappointed to see rust Kris but delighted to see that digitalis in flower. It's a beauty. Two stunning vases as usual - I don't know how you do it each week!

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    1. I didn't expect that my luck would last indefinitely with respect to the snapdragons, Anna, but those in the 'Chantilly' series are so pretty I wish I'd have planted them much earlier. Next year perhaps!

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  12. Oh my goodness! I'm partial to peach and shades of salmon and coral, etc. So I LOVE that first bouquet. Expert arranging, as always, Kris!

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    1. Thanks Beth. I'm rather partial to those colors as well.

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  13. So beautiful and how wonderful to get your first blooms from the Digitalis - even moreso as you grew it from seed. To me, you can't really get more exciting than that!

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    1. Growing from seed does take longer but it is rewarding, Margaret.

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