Monday, April 26, 2021

In a Vase on Monday: Going overboard (again)

It's Spring.  I can't help myself.  I started with a clear idea of what I wanted in my first vase and a vague notion of a possibility for a second arrangement.  And I ended up with four vases.   The problem arose at the start when, cutting materials for the first vase, I got carried away and cut more than the vase could hold.


Leucospermum 'Brandi' is one of my favorite flowers at the moment but this arrangement was actually inspired by my desire to use the last of the presentable Narcissi before the next stretch of very warm weather arrives later this week

I finally got a handful of Iceland poppies to bloom and added a couple to dress up the back of this arrangement

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Abelia 'Kaleidoscope', Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Alstroemeria 'Indian Summer', Leucospermum 'Brandi', Narcissus tazetta 'Geranium', and Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy) shown with Lotus berthelotii 'Amazon Sunset'

When I realized that I literally couldn't stuff anything more into the first vase, I pulled out another one for the overflow materials I'd already cut.

I'd thought that the flowers of Aeonium 'Kiwi Verde', currently blooming all over the garden, and the chartreuse and rusty red flowers of Salvia lanceolata might offer a nice complement to the orange Leucospermum but there wasn't room to cram those stems into the first vase

Back view showing off the Aeonium flowers

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Aeonium haworthii 'Kiwi Verde', Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Alstroemeria 'Claire', and Salvia lanceolata

I cut all my flowers on Sunday morning before I have breakfast so I already had flowers cut for what was supposed to be vase #2 but ended up as vase #3.

The noID snapdragons I grew from plugs are showing the first signs of rust so I cut them and the only Anemone 'Bi-color' still in good shape

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Abelia grandiflora 'Edward Goucher', Anemone coronaria 'Bi-color', red and white Antirrhinum majus, Coriandrum sativum, and Penstemon mexicali 'Mini Red Bells'


The contents of the fourth arrangement weren't cut on Sunday.  The foxglove is a holdover from one of last week's arrangements and the sweet peas were cut late last week for the kitchen island but I'm sharing them to show off the magical color transformation of Lathyrus 'Blue Shift' as the blooms age.

The vase of "leftovers" too good not to share

These photos show how the color of Lathyrus odoratus 'Blue Shift' changes from magenta to purple to turquoise blue.  I grew these from seed.


Enough from me!  For more IAVOM creations, check in with our host, Cathy of Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

28 comments:

  1. I bet it's easy to get carried away when everything is blooming in the garden. It would only be a problem if you ran out of vases. The overflow material is lovely, but the real stunner is, of course, the first vase.

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    1. Actually, I looked into the cabinet that contains my vases and thought I could use some more. Where I'd put them is another matter altogether...

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  2. FOUR vases Kris, that doesn't hapen very often, even for you!! I am particularly drawn to the smaller two, both with their striking colours - the antirrhonum looks great with that anemone and the sweet peas and foxglove combo works beautifully

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    1. I'm very fond of that foxglove/sweet pea arrangement myself, Cathy, although I suspect it won't hold together as well as some of the others.

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  3. You have a real artist's eye, with bringing complementary colours together, but most of all I must congratulate you on your gardening skills that bring so many lovely blooms together.

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    1. Thanks Noelle. Actually, I'm surprised at just how floriferous my garden has become over the years since we removed all our lawn in favor of expanding garden beds.

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  4. All beautifully put together Kris. I think that my favourite is the last one. I grew sweet pea 'Blue Shift' once but I'm sure that mine didn't look as attractive. I will have to give it another go.

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    1. I vaguely recall buying Lathyrus 'Blue Shift' in a 4-inch pot at some time in the past but I don't remember getting flowers this dramatic, Anna.

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  5. All four ended up looking very different from one another! I like the orange hues and wavy Agonis foliage with the gray-green glaze on the first vase. The Salvia leucantha is a lovely mauve color, the snaps look amazing (sorry that the rust has reappeared), and I'm in awe of the sweet pea transformation. So spectacular!

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    1. I'm in awe of those sweet peas every time I look at them too, Eliza. I can't remember any other flower demonstrating that kind of transformation, although there are a couple of dahlias that might come close.

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  6. Oooo, I like that first one! I mean they're all amazing, but I'm partial to those shades of peach/orange/sage, etc. Wow! :)

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    1. Thanks Phillip. April-June is generally my peak bloom period. July-September is another matter altogether.

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  8. Bountiful bronzes from your garden. I am loving that first arrangement!The Blue Shift photos are wonderful.

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    1. I expect 'Blue Shift' is going to be on my sweet pea seed list every year from now on, Amelia ;)

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  9. I’m enjoying all four vase arrangements and it is amazing all the variety of flower colors and textures you have in your garden. I will need to keep an eye out my A. Kiwi flowers. Your 3rd vase is particularly charming: the rose of the vase is complemented by the Anemone bicolor. Even the coriander is beautiful! Is this the same as the cilantro I would grow? I would dread seeing my cilantro bolt so fast in my garden, and now, I’m thinking of adding seeds throughout both for its leaves and flowers since we use it for meals so often. Your successive transformation photos of L. ‘Blue Shift’ should be used as an advertisement for this sweet pea, because I sure will want those for next year! Wishing you a beautiful Tuesday!

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    1. The Coriandrum sativum is exactly what you would use to grow cilantro or coriander seeds for seasoning. I didn't purposefully sow the seeds this year - they arrived on their own, presumably deposited from last year's crop. The flowers make a great filler. The stems are prone to drooping after they're cut but they perk up within hours. I usually dip the stem ends in hot water to hurry their recovery along. And, if the plants go to seed, you can either save the seeds for use in backing or plant them next fall ;)

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  10. As I was reading your introduction I couldn't help think "if you've got it, flaunt it!"

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  11. So many lovely blooms you ended up with 4 vases? If only I had that problem! They are all lovely and the leafy stems that you chose are just perfect with their reddish tinges.

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    1. Agonis flexuosa 'Nana' has become my go-to foliage for floral arrangements, Margaret. In addition to its wonderful color, it has a graceful manner AND a light peppermint scent. The species, Agonis flexuosa, are known by the common name of peppermint willow.

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  12. You're going to need a bigger vase!

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    1. I have some really tall ones but I guess I need some wider medium-high ones ;)

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  13. Wow, so many gorgeous flowers Kris! I have never seen an Aeonium flower before. Amazing. Love all the oranges and rusts in the first one, and of course the sweet peas.

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    1. Thanks Cathy. Unlike most other Aeoniums of my acquaintance, 'Kiwi Verde' blooms early and prolifically. As the rosettes bearing the flowers die back, the blooms spoils the neat appearance of the plants somewhat but then they're easy to start over with cuttings.

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  14. The anemone is a true star in the 3rd vase. Along with the ruffles of the beautiful snapdragons, the flowers look perfect for the vase. I am smitten with the first vase. It's nicely balanced and I love each bit of material, but the color especially wows. Hope you're having a good week.

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    1. Luckily, there's a lot of orange in my garden!

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