Monday, January 27, 2020

In a Vase on Monday: The Stars of my January Garden

I focused on two of the stars of my January garden this week.  One is close to reaching its peak and the other is nearly past it and both deserve a little time on the center stage.

This is Camellia williamsii 'Taylor's Perfection'.  I think it was the first plant I bought for my garden here after we moved in.  I had several Camellias in my former tiny garden but, due to our persistent problem with drought, this is the only one I've planted here.  Luckily, I also inherited a few well-established Camellia sasanqua with the garden.


Camellias generally don't last long in a vase but I enjoy having them in the house, if only briefly, so I can enjoy their beauty up close.

I chose an asymmetrical glass vase and plants with subtle pink touches to let the Camellias shine

Back view: The yellow at the throat of the Nemesia picks up the color at the center of the Camellia in a subtle echo

Top view

Clockwise from the left: Camellia williamsii 'Taylor's Perfection', Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold', Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl', and Nemesia 'Snow Angel'


I usually feature the flower-like bracts of Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder' in a vase earlier in January.

These plants get big!  I brought the one on the left with me from my old house in a pot and it exploded in size once planted in the ground.  The one on the right has only been in the ground 3 years but it's already giving me reason for concern that it might outgrow its spot.  I cut both down by about half once their winter "bloom" cycle is cover.


Some of the yellow bracts of the Leucadendron are already developing the reddish color they get as they age and the central cones are gradually shifting from yellow to brown so the window to share them in a vase was narrowing.

The only floral accents I included were a few stems of paperwhite Narcissus

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder', Corokia x virgata 'Sunsplash', Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', noID Narcissus, and Phormium 'Maori Queen'


We had a few warm days last week and expect to have even higher temperatures in the mid-to-upper 70sF this week.  Sadly, there's no rain in the forecast for the next couple of weeks but, if we can't have rain, maybe I'll at least have some new blooms to share next week.

For more IAVOM posts, check in with Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2020 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

28 comments:

  1. Stars indeed. The camellia is wonderful.And that leucadendron, oh my goodness, I wish I could grow it. Both arrangements are fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm afraid the Camellias don't care much for our new heating system. They've already dropped most of their fully open blooms and it remains to be seen whether any of the buds with open.

      Delete
  2. Both vases are fabulous Kris. The pink camellia is gorgeous and the whole arrangement is so feminine and pretty, and I love the gentle colours in your second vase. Lovely treats, as always. Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/01/bellis-perennis-in-vase-on-monday.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, I am so envious of your Camellias! Everything else of course, too, but especially the Camellias. I am just a little too cold to grow them here. I tried them in a pot for overwintering once, and that didn't work well. Maybe I'll try it again. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Much as I love Camellias, I'm reluctant to plant any more under conditions of intermittent drought, Beth. At least 'Taylor's Perfection' and the sasanquas I inherited with the garden were well-established by the time drought and water restrictions became significant issues.

      Delete
  4. Yes, the camellias are fabulous. Such a perfect shade of pink and lovely form. They look beautiful in your vase. That leucadendron is grand as well. I've thought of growing it but the size makes me cautious. Love the Phormium in your vase too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought of you, Susie, as I was fussing with the Phormium leaves. You've made handling leaves like those look effortless but I found it anything but!

      Delete
  5. Oh your predicted temperatures sound positively summery Kris. The camellia is beautiful as is the leucadendron. I noticed this morning the first two flowers have opened on our neighbour's camellia - name unknown but most pink and pretty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those are more like Spring temperatures for us, Anna. Summer temperatures tend to run MUCH higher these days!

      Delete
  6. That camellia is such a pretty color pink - quite pleasing to the eye. You've picked some good flowers to accompany it. I remember loving the abundance of Coleonema blossoms when I visited last year.
    Amazing how daisy-like the Leucadendron 'blooms' are and the foliage mixed in complements nicely. I always admire how you manage to create original work every week!
    How's dear Pipig doing? Hope she's made a complete recovery. <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pipig had the first of 6 chemotherapy treatments a week and a half ago, Eliza. She has 5 more scheduled at 3-week intervals. So far she's handling it well but her weight dropped significantly between surgery and the start of chemo, which has me a bit worried. I've been working hard to tempt her with tasty meals and morsels, hand-feeding her at times. If her weight doesn't come up a bit within the next week, I'll probably have to employ an appetite stimulant.

      Delete
    2. I had a kitty that needed appetite stimulant, and as I recall, it worked well. Hugs and kisses to her. <3

      Delete
    3. The hand-feeding is getting tedious and my husband thinks I've turned her into a greater prima-donna than she already was. We're going to weigh her at the beginning of next week to see if she's gained any weight and make a decision about the appetite stimulant then.

      Delete
  7. I love the pink camellia vase. I love them both, but pink is my weakness. I didn't realize how much camellias look like roses. If you hadn't said, I would have thought it was a rose. Lovely - do they have a nice smell?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly, I don't detect any scent in the Camellias, Cindy, although my nose for scent isn't great to start with.

      Delete
  8. Oh I do like the asymmetrical vase, Kris, and what a pretty camellia that is - but I wondered if it stood our more against the slightly darker background of the fist picture...what do you think? The muted greenish yellow shades in your second vase work really well together - what attractive bracts the leucadendron has. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was playing around with different backgrounds in my mostly white kitchen, Cathy. I expect you're right that the Camellias would stand out more against a darker background than that white tile.

      Delete
  9. This is a gorgeous, delicate variety which I must look out for! I've only C. sasanqua so far and think it copes really well with our hot and dry summers. I'd love Yuletide which Susie features in her vase sometimes. As always your vases are delightful. Happy late winter days, Annette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a really beautiful Camellia hybrid, Annette. I was unable to resist its allure 9 years ago - I wasn't looking for a Camellia at the time!

      Delete
  10. Ahhh, those camellia blossoms are stunning. I always think of them as the other roses. Happy IAVOM.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Camellias do look a lot like roses, Lisa, although I think they're petals are even silkier.

      Delete
  11. Both of your vases are wonderful Kris. Even though the camellia we inherited with the house was a garish combination of hot pink and white stripes I still miss it (even though it was my decision to get get rid of it).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have some trouble warming up to the Camellias with variegated petals myself, Loree.

      Delete
  12. Lovely, lovely Camellia! I miss having them in the garden. My Mom&Dad's house had old established Camellias when they bought the house in 1972 and they were still there, strong and healthy, blooming magnificently, when I sold the house in 2005.

    Enjoying my 'Wilson' a lot, too. Great plant!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If water/rain wasn't a constant issue, HB, I'd have more Camellias as I do love them. It's too dicey to get them established now.

      Delete
  13. I sure wish we could grow Leucadendron here. I love the texture so much. That Camellia is outstanding! I love how you designed it in a vase with the other flowers. Just beautiful! Also, thank you for being so faithful with visiting my blog. I am trying to get better with reciprocating. You're a jewel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm enjoying your new approach to your blog posts, Grace, even if I can't grow a lot of what you can!

      Delete

I enjoy receiving your comments and suggestions!