Monday, January 13, 2020

In a Vase on Monday: Mixing things up

I dug a little deeper this week to identify plants I haven't used recently to mix things up with those I've used more frequently.  I kicked off my first vase with the flower-like bracts of Leucadendron 'Summer Red'.

The bracts on the 'Summer Red' I cut are paler than others in my garden, possibly because they get less sun.  In any case, they were quickly eclipsed by the flowers of Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream'.

Back view: Most of the energy of this arrangement came from the curious brown flowers of Chrondropetalum elephantinum (aka Large Cape Rush), which was sold to me as the dwarf C. tectorum (Small Cape Rush).  Mine is most definitely not a dwarf!  Planted in a succulent bed at the front of our property, it spills over into the street, hiding 3 Agaves planted in front of it.

Top view, showing off the pales rosebud-like bracts of Leucadendron 'Summer Red'

Clockwise from the upper left: Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream', Chrondropetalum elephantinum, Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', Leucadendron salignum 'Summer Red', Lobelia laxiflora foliage, and Nemesia 'Snow Angel'


Amaryllis 'Zombie' is closing in on the end of its seasonal run.  I initially thought I'd just refresh the vase I've had in place for the last 2 weeks but, as most of the contents of that vase were past their prime, I decided to give 'Zombie' a fresh look with a different mix of stems.

Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) 'Zombie' has put on a very good show, although the heat from our new HVAC system dries the flowers out in record time

Back view: 'Zombie' hangs out in my lath (shade) house and, while I was there to clip a new flower stalk, I cut a couple of the tropicalesque stems of Fatsia 'Camouflage' too even if it's not remotely tropical here at the moment.  While we had a couple of days with daytime temperatures above 70F early last week, it's generally been colder than usual and since December 26th we've only had 1/100th of an inch of rain.

Top view: 'Zombie' is pretty flashy but I think the colorful bracts of Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' give it a run for its money

Clockwise from the upper left: Hippeastrum 'Zombie', leftover noID green Chrysanthemum, Euryops virgineus 'Tali', Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset', and Fatsia japonica 'Camouflage'


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to find more IAVOM posts.



All material © 2012-2020 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

22 comments:

  1. Beautiful gentle colours in your vases this week Kris. Really lovely, and I particularly love the colours in your first vase. Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/01/in-january-vase-on-monday.html

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    1. Thanks Amanda. The first vase turned out much better than I thought it would at the start. The cape rush added some magic.

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  2. The first vase made me pause...I really did not think there would be a second one, but then another admiring gasp: two top notch vases with exotic blooms.

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    1. Even when my garden is far from its peak, I seem to have difficulty stopping at just one vase, Noelle. It's clear I'm a flower addict!

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  3. Oh those Leucadendron are both gorgeous, but the overall effect of them in the second vase with the amaryllis is stunning - who needs witch hazels?!! Thanks for sharing Kris

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    1. I don't remember Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' being quite as striking in prior winters. Perhaps it's a product of colder temperatures this year.

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  4. Just watched a program on South African flora. Interesting to see the plants in their native habitat as well as gracing your beautiful arrangements. Would be fun to visit S.A someday.

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    1. South Africa offers a truly incredible range of flowers, Elaine, only a fraction of which have reached North America. Diana (the next commentator below) lives there and frequently posts photos of what are wildflowers in the Cape region of that country.

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  5. and from South Africa I enjoy our plants with fresh enthusiasm when I see them cherished in a garden.
    Haven't yet found a truly dwarf restio for this small garden.

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    1. I love that Chondropetalum, Diana, but its size is really out of proportion to the area it currently occupies. It took years to reach its current size, which may be how so many of the "dwarfs" sold here have found themselves in circulation.

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  6. I love those frilly dilly blooms in that first vase, I think you called them Grevillea. They have such personality. Both vases are quite nice. Happy IAVOM.

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    1. My garden wouldn't be the same without Grevilleas (aka spider flowers) - or Leucadendrons. The large-flowered Grevilleas (like 'Peaches & Cream') are also year-round bloomers, which makes them especially valuable.

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  7. Walking through your garden must be like walking through a florist, with unlimited flowers available. What a joy to have such extravagant color and varieties, especially in the midst of winter. I envy you Kris!

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    1. Oh, the flowers aren't unlimited, Cindy! I was complaining to Cathy (Rambling in the Garden) just today how I wished I could grow witch hazels. Some plants stubbornly refuse to tolerate our mild winter climate and our short rainy season.

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  8. Another two primo arrangements, Kris! I've loved G. 'Peaches and Cream' ever since seeing it here (my official intro to west coast plants ;) ). Another favorite is L. 'Safari Sunset' which looks terrific with H. 'Zombie' and the Fatsia leaves. Superb set!

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    1. Thanks! I expected little from these 2 arrangements at the start, Eliza, but I was pleased with how both came together.

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  9. The fatsia really sets off the flowers in that second vase. Love how the Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' supports the paler amaryllis in front. And that first vase is simply splendid. Grevillea and Leucadendron work beautifully together. Have a good week. Wish I could share some rain.

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    1. I too wish you could send your excess rain this way, Susie. We've had only a trivial amount since December 26th. There's a good chance of light rain later this week but I'm trying not to get invested in the possibility yet as the last storm that was forecast passed us right by.

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  10. Both vases are so lovely and fabulous colours. I have never seen such a gorgeous Hippeastrum as Zombie. And I always covet your grevillea.

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    1. Despite its name, 'Zombie' is a real winner in my view.

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  11. Wow! Your "zombie" vase is a knockout, perhaps one of my favorites ever. I'm also impressed with how you used the Chrondropetalum elephantinum, fabulous!

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    1. The 'Zombie' vase was a last minute inspiration, Loree. 'Safari Sunset' added just the right punch.

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