Monday, April 22, 2019

In a Vase on Monday: Spinning through Spring

Spring has suddenly become very busy.  That's partly due to preparations for (gulp!) an upcoming home remodel; partly to a significant increase in the docent tours I'm conducting at my local botanic garden; and partly due to the demands of my own garden.  I keep hearing there's an uptick in our temperatures on the horizon so I've been trying to prepare my garden for summer; however, thus far, temperatures have remained below average.  Spring often turns into Summer without much warning here but maybe I need to slow down a bit and just enjoy the current season while I can.

Leucospermum 'Brandi' seems to be in a hurry as well.  The shrub's full of mature flowers now so I decided to cut three for use in a vase this week.  The flowers look like pinwheels so they fit the spinning theme.

The arrangement bears some similarities to one I created in late March but it includes an interesting new element in the form of Nigella orientalis 'Transformer'.  (I misidentified the plant as Bupleurum in last week's Bloom Day post but helpful readers of my blog and Instagram posts pointed me in the right direction.)

I planted both 'Transformer' and Bulpleurum from seed in the same raised planter.  The latter has yet to make an appearance but 'Transformer' has a nice display going.

The Ranunculus are just about finished, taken out prematurely after being buffeted by a few rounds of Santa Ana winds

Clockwise from the upper left: Leucospermum 'Brandi', Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Lotus berthelotii 'Gold Flash', Ranunculus, and Nigella orientalis 'Transformer'


Last week I admired the Dutch Iris Christina of My Hesperides Garden featured in her IAVOM post, commenting that I'd like to have some in similar colors, only to be surprised by the appearance of two similar blooms in my front garden late last week.  I planted the bulbs in October 2017 and all I remembered about them was that they were pale blue in color but they're actually a mix of blue and white with a touch of yellow at the throat.

According to my records, the Iris is 'Silver Beauty'

I played off the yellow at the throats of the Iris with the addition of Phlomis fruticosa (aka Jeruselem sage)

I added more light blue to the mix with the stems of the same Salvia I used last week

Clockwise from the upper left: Centranthus ruber 'Albus', noID self-planted Cotoneaster, seed-grown Orlaya grandiflora, Salvia heldriechiana, Phlomis fruticosa, Limonium perezii, Westringia fruticosa 'Morning Light' and, in the center, Iris hollandica 'Silver Beauty'


For more Monday vases, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  Best wishes for a happy Earth Day!



All material © 2012-2019 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

32 comments:

  1. Gorgeous arrangements! We seem to have a similar transition into summer - or it may just be that we get a lot of rain, etc., in the spring which is not conducive to being in the garden, so the actual gardening time available before the summer heat hits is nowhere near as much as I would like.

    And those iris are beautiful! I love garden surprises - well, the good kind anyhow ;)

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    1. Unfortunately, our rain shuts off around the end of March. Spring rain is an anomaly and summer rain is a freak event but at least this winter's rain left the state of California in good shape as we embark on our long dry period.

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  2. Love that Leucospermum 'Brandi' I would have a hard time adding anything to a vase with those drama queens, but of course you have other flowers that coordinate.

    BTW I haven't been able to comment when I read blogs on my iPad at night. I have no idea what's going on, and hope the issue resolves itself soon. I just wanted to mention that so you knew why I haven't been commenting on your blog much lately.

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    1. Apple probably ran an update with unintended consequences. I hope the glitch resolves itself.

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  3. I'm having the same problem as Loree with comments lately. Your garden/vases are looking splendid!

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    1. Thanks Denise. I hope someone somewhere in Apple-dom waves a magic wand to resolve the glitch someday soon.

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  4. The 'pin wheels' in the first vase are so striking, Kris, and you have filled ut the arrangement perefctly with the other material. Good to see all the blues in your second vase, and accentuating the yellow of the irises works with the other blooms works so well

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    1. I'm in love with that Leucospermum, Cathy. It'll be interesting to see how long its flowering period lasts.

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  5. As always two fabulous vases Kris and a what a great post title. I love the striking whirligig flowers of Leucospermum 'Brandi'. What a treasure. You have inspired me to dig out the nigella orientalis 'Transformer' seed packet which is lurking in my seed box so thank you :) Happy Earth Day to you!

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    1. I must have seen a photo of 'Transformer' in flower when I ordered the seeds but I was still surprised when I saw the flower in bloom in my own garden, Anna. You should definitely plant your seeds!

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  6. I like the way you emphasise the yellow in the Iris with the Phlomis.

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    1. Phlomis is such a cool plant - I'd been looking for another opportunity to use it in an arrangement.

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  7. Your variety continues to amaze me, the Luecospermum reminds me of Protea. Love the blues, I love little garden surprises like your Iris.

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    1. Leucospermums, like Leucadendrons, are in the Protea family, Amelia. They do all have a distinctive look about them.

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  8. Another feast of flowers Kris! Such lovely colours and I particularly love the Orlaya grandiflora. A very beautiful flower. Gorgeous. Thank you. Amanda

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    1. I grew the Orlaya from seed this year, Amanda. Last year, I planted seedlings obtained from a mail order nursery and rabbits ate the plants to the ground overnight once I got them in the ground. The rabbits don't seem to have discovered my raised planters yet :)

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  9. Lovely vases, Kris! The pinwheels of Leucospermum remind me of those mounted fireworks that spin. The Dutch iris are such a soft color and the yellow Phlomis complements them well.
    Hope you find time to enjoy the rest of the spring weather while you can.

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    1. I was able to spend most of the day in my garden today, which felt great, Eliza. It was a good way to spend Earth Day.

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  10. We have had summer temperatures yesterday and today. Tomorrow we have spring temps. It is always up and down here until it gets hot and stays hot. Lucky people having you taking them on tours. Happy IAVOM.

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    1. We usually have more warm to hot spells, often starting as early as January. We've had a few days in the low 80s but not many and no scorchers, not that I'm complaining!

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  11. I noticed right away that your kitchen is still intact ! I'm sure you've already strategized a temporary location to create your beautiful flower vases.And I must have some of that Nigella 'Transformer'!

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    1. Construction of the temporary kitchen is now 80% done, Kathy. Our formerly sunny master bathroom now feels like a cave as the window's blocked by the new structure. Demo is expected to start the first week of June and, before then, we have to pack up half the house and move several major appliances. Ugh.

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  12. The iris is such a nice one Kris. I always enjoy your Leucospermum --'Brandi' is especially a great color and you've found perfect companions.

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    1. I've been surprised at how well Dutch Iris do in our climate, Susie. I'd always thought they were water hogs but they seem to do just fine underground during our very long dry season.

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  13. Glad to know that summer is holding off for your garden, Kris!
    Those irises really are beauties; I've never seen that variety, except in catalogs - it's luscious! And seems particularly right paired with your Limonium perezii.
    Hope the detail/red tape work for your new kitchen is going well!

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    1. It looks as though we have a date for demolition so I guess that's progress...

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  14. You always have such stunning arrangements in a beautiful array of flowers. It must be so fun to have so many to pick from when creating.

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    1. Southern California's climate presents some challenges, Cindy, but you can't beat its year-round gardening opportunities.

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  15. Brandi sure is flashy.

    The 'Silver Beauty' Iris is maybe later than the rest? I have a few too and they have just appeared this week after the others are all finished. Nice surprise.

    Yes, your remodel looms. Can't wait for it to start and dreading it at the same time. Only when it is finally done can you finally enjoy it.

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    1. If your 'Silver Beauty' are also blooming later, your theory may be valid, HB. I'd chalked up the timing to the fact that mine are planted in a somewhat shadier area of the garden. The remodel, yes, it looks like it's going to become a reality after all...

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  16. A yellow Nigella? I live and learn! Both lovely arrangements again Kris. Silver Beauty stands out beautifully even though you have so many other lovely flowers in the arrangement,

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    1. The yellow Nigella was a revelation for me too, Cathy. The flower is, as kids used to say, "too cool for school." I even like the seedpods after the petals drop.

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