Monday, September 12, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Fresh Blooms

In my last "IaVoM" post, I commented that fall can mimic spring here.  We expected a warm-up last week and, although temperatures did rise, they didn't soar as high as expected and evening temperatures remained pleasant.  Daytime temperatures are expected to decline again this week and one forecast even includes a slight chance of light rain.  (Be still my heart!)  I'm not counting further heatwaves out, nor on getting any rain, but the garden has responded to the cooler temperatures and higher humidity with some fresh blooms, which I included in my vases this week.

My first vase was inspired by a flush of flowers on Osteospermum '4D Silver'.  The Osteospermum is reportedly an improvement on O. '3D Silver'.  The newer hybrid ostensibly has the advantage of blooms that remain open in low light.  I've never cut Osteospermum for vases because the blooms usually close in the dimmer light indoors.

Front view, highlighting the navy blue and white flowers of Osteospermum '4D Silver'

Back view, highlighting Hebe 'Purple Shamrock', blooming for the first time

Top view, showing off white and blue forms of Eustoma grandiflorum (Lisianthus)

The contents of the vase are shown in close-up here, clockwise from the left: Eustoma grandiflorum, Hebe 'Purple Shamrock', Osteospermum '4D Silver', and the silvery dried seedpods of Catananche caerulea


My second vase celebrates a new flush of bloom on my 'Medallion' rose.  I had very few blooms on my roses this year so a dozen blooms opening almost all at once on this shrub was hard to miss.  The blooms were huge but the stems were weak and most of the flowers drooped.  I cut 2 of the most recent flowers, one still in bud, and selected other flowers to help prop up the blooms in my vase.

Front view

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains: Rosa 'Medallion', Abelia 'Kaleidoscope', Jacobaea maritima, Lantana camara 'Irene', Leucadendron salignum 'Chief', Tanacetum parthenium, and Zinnia


The first vase sits in my home office.  The second sits in the front entry.  Last week's vase, still in good shape, retains its place on the dining room table.

Last night, the Osteospermum flowers remained open when the sun went down

And the rose cut in bud is showing some signs of opening this morning


Visit Cathy, the host of "IaVoM," at Rambling in the Garden to see what she and other participants have come up with to put in their vases this week.



All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

26 comments:

  1. Wow - those osteospermum are stunning, and a great contrast with my favourite lisianthus. Lovely lovely! The second vase is pretty too but is no watch for your blue and white one - thanks for sharing both of them though and I hope it stays cooler for you

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    1. Sadly, that deep blue Lisianthus doesn't seem to be nearly as robust as the pink varieties.

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  2. The blue of the Lisianthus is, as always, captivating; my little plants actually have some flowers, I so hope I can nurse them through the winter. I very much like the Osteospermum too, the lavender-coloured centre is most attractive. We have rain Kris, I can't tell you how wonderful that feels.

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    1. I'm very, very envious of your rain, Christina. There's still a slight chance of drizzle showing in our forecast for tonight and tomorrow morning but I'm trying not to get invested in the possibility.

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  3. Per usual, I love them both! I've admired your osteospermum before - I love the semi-double bicolor. The rose is such a nice color, both blousy and in bud. That mouse on the monarch is so charming!

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    1. I can't recall where I picked up that mouse on the monarch (or why). It surfaced just a few months ago in one of my regular purges of household belongings.

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  4. was looking at blue and white china today.
    Lisianthus captures both colours perfectly!

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    1. I've always loved those blue and white china patterns myself, Diana.

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  5. The Osteospermum is pretty but I think my favorite is the Luecadendron foliage. I keep wondering if I can grow that here. The Hebe as well - it is one of those things you see in the nursery but never in the landscape.

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    1. Leucadendrons, natives of South Africa, reportedly don't like too much water in summer so you might have some issues there. Hebes hail from New Zealand and can take regular water. As they don't like dry summer heat, they might actually do better in Florida than they do here.

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  6. I adore the first vase, so vibrant and fresh. Didn't think you could top it but that rose commands some attention too. Both are lovely arrangements Kris!

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    1. After staring at the roses for days, I had to cut a couple for the house. They were planted (by a prior owner) near the trash cans so bringing them into the house gives them a better chance to be appreciated.

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  7. I'm always in love with your gorgeous Eustoma flowers. I'm really tempted to try growing them from seed next year. The Osteospermum and Hebe go with them so well. I also like your second arrangement, peach roses are the best! And I always have a pang seeing Lantana since it was a childhood fascination of mine, but now I don't have to because I just bought one on sale, 'Landmark Blaze', with red, orange and yellow florets so I can finally enjoy one up close, I love them in your arrangement.

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    1. I hope you're doing well, Hannah! I hadn't thought of using Lantana in a vase until I saw Amy use in for her vases ("A Small, Sunny Garden"). The plants have really done well since I started watering them a bit more.

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  8. The shape of each arrangement seems to mirror each other too, lovely as always!

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  9. The osteospermum are very fetching. I love their pompom blue centres and am glad that you had success with them staying open in low light. Nicely contrasting vases. Beautiful.

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    1. I'd wondered if the Osteopermum would really stay open in low light as some Gazania breeders made similar claims for one of their series and I was less than impressed. However, this Osteospermum has proven the claim.

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  10. Goodness, they really are navy blue. What a fabulous colour. And the Eustoma flowers are gorgeous too.I am always envious of them. I love the colours of the second vase too.

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    1. In addition to breeding an Osteospermum that doesn't close in low light, the growers also improved the color of the flower in my opinion. While '3D' really was silvery in color, '4D' is a much deeper blue. The back side of the petals are also blue.

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  11. I love those osteospermums Kris! They look great with the blue Eustoma. And your oeachy rose is gorgeous too. :) I hope Eustomas will catch on as a summer container plant here one day. Would love to grow them but they are not available here!

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    1. Eustoma/Lisianthus have been around for decades (although I think the double forms are a more recent development) so it surprises me that they're not more popular even here.

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  12. Your Eustoma/Lisianthus flowers are so gorgeous and long blooming! Your arrangements are well done as always!

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    1. Fortunately, the Eustoma don't all bloom at once!

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  13. I can't believe the blue on that Lisianthus - fabulous! And an Osteospermum that stays open indoors? Definitely an improvement... ;-)
    Two lovely vases, Kris!

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    1. Thanks Amy! Unfortunately, these blue Eustoma, which I got by mail order in spring, aren't nearly as tough as the blue variety ('Borealis Blue') I grew in prior years.

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