Monday, September 5, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Delicate Beauty

We enjoyed a brief fall preview this Labor Day weekend, which marks the unofficial end of summer.  Although we expect a warm up as the week progresses, both the garden and I are anxiously anticipating the seasonal change.  In fact, the garden surprised me by signaling the pending change with a sudden flush of bloom on the Clematis terniflora, commonly known as sweet autumn clematis.  Planted in 2013, this vine had so disappointed me that I was planning to tear it out but now it's earned itself a second chance.

Clematis terniflora climbing up the arbor on the south side of the house


I've also had another flush of bloom on the pink-tinged, pale yellow Eustoma grandiflorum (Lisianthus), which I thought would pair well with the delicate flowers of the clematis.

Unfortunately, photographing an arrangement with such pale colors in a mostly white kitchen doesn't show it to great advantage

I'd planned to mix in pink flowers to complement the pink touches in the Lisianthus but then felt the arrangement didn't really need it.  However, since I'd already cut stems of Leptospermum 'Pink Pearl', I compromised and tucked those into the back of the vase.

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase includes: Eustoma grandiflorum, Abelia x grandiflora 'Hopley's' (photographed outside), Clematis terniflora (photographed outside), Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl', and Ozothamnus diosmifolius (photographed outside).  The latter adds a light touch of scent.


The new vase displaced the red hot arrangement from last week.  (The Leucadendrons held up but most of the other plants did not.)  The soft colors of the new arrangement may conjure images of spring for some viewers but as fall is widely referred to here as our "second spring," the vase seems season-appropriate to me.

New vase on the dining room table


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden, our "IaVoM" host, to find more vases created from materials sourced from contributors' own gardens.  Best wishes for a great week to all.  I hope all of you in the US eastern seaboard are safe and not waterlogged.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

28 comments:

  1. It's funny how plants can do that to you. 'One last chance' I say, and sometimes they take it and surprise. I imagine the garden smells wonderful. We walked our lake yesterday and every so often I could smell the clematis and turned to see where it was growing. A rampant beauty but so fragrant. Your flowers are beautifully displayed, as usual. Happy Fall!!

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    1. It is funny how plants seem to snap to when under threat of removal. Perhaps I need to make the rounds of my garden distributing threats on a regular basis!

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  2. This is fairly "springy"...and light and airy and beautiful! Funny though I picture you standing on a chair to get the from above shot, which is hard to do since I have no idea what you look like!

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    1. I never stand on a chair, although I do stand on my tippy-toes with arms stretched above my head quite a bit - I shoot a few shots blind in the hope of getting one that's good enough to publish. As to what I look like, envision that 5 year old in my side-bar with several decades on her. I even still have the blonde hair, although my hairdresser deserves most of the credit for that.

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  3. Kris, this is one of my favorites you've done. It does look like springtime there.

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    1. The claim that fall is a "second spring" is very true here and you can find a surprisingly assortment of blooms when the temperatures drop, at least until a late heatwave strikes. Scorching heatwaves in October aren't at all unusual. In fact, we viewed this house for the first time in October during such an event - I had to beg my husband just to get out of the car for the tour.

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  4. Those colours are simply beautiful!

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    1. Thanks, Anca! I'm rather pleased with the effect myself.

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  5. The top view shows the arrangement off especially well and it looks perfect on your dining table with the foliage setting the pale blooms off to perfection. I don't know this autumn clematis at all and must look it up. Thnaks for sharing

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    1. The small-flowered clematis are said to be easier to grow in my climate. Thus far, it's the only kind I've been successful in growing.

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  6. soft and lovely for a second spring - as we head off to see spring wildflowers.

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    1. Our 2 springs are my favorite seasons. Enjoy your wildflower tour, Diana!

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  7. Delicate and very primaveraesque (a new word for springy) arrangements keep the sweet autumn clematis you will love it!

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    1. I'll have to remember that term! My on-line dictionary didn't recognize it but said it might be a neologism, which suggests you're ahead of the curve.

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  8. I love the delicate beauty of this one, Kris - spring or autumn :) Congratulations on the good showing from the clematis; it looks like the perfect thing for that arbor.
    I notice you've used Ozothamnus and it looks great. Mine has been pretty chlorotic all summer, so much so that I've wondered whether I want to keep it. Yours looks nice and green... any advice?

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    1. My guess is that the problem with chlorosis with respect to Australian plants like the Ozothamnus all comes down to the soil. I have problems with mine in some areas but not in others. I've purchased a soil test kit but still haven't conducted one on my own soil; however, pending confirmation, my guess is I'm going to be adding iron sulfate in the problem areas to treat an iron deficiency.

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  9. I love the clematis what a good thing you spared it. Your arrangements are lovely and look very summery.Please don' t tell me it' s autumn. I' m not ready for it yet.

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    1. Our autumn is probably more like your summer, only the days are shorter.

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  10. Hi Kris, I love the combination of the Clematis terniflora, which is new to me, and the Lisianthus. The big blowzy flowers of the latter together with the very delicate ones of the clematis in these soft colors are so charming together.
    I have never thought of autumn as a second spring here in Southern California. It is true that many plants start to flower again, after the heat of summer is gone, but for me there is such a distinct difference in the natural light between spring and autumn and the general atmosphere in the garden even in our mild climate.
    I am traveling right now and your posts makes me really miss my own garden! Crazy how attached I am to it!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I hope you're traveling for fun rather than business, Christina.

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  11. Your pretty pastels do speak of cooler weather if not spring itself. Our temperatures have suddenly dipped too, a welcome relief.

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    1. I'm glad at least the weather is treating you well, Christina!

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  12. Another beautiful arrangement. I love the thrill of having a plant that I've just about given up on suddenly bloom. -Jean

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    1. I grew the same clematis in my old garden and it was spectacular but the reduced irrigation here caused it to suffer. As I dramatically under-spent the water budget we were given last year and as our water district also recently loosened our restrictions, I've been doing more hand-watering. I'm still being careful but the impact of providing just a little more water has been significant.

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  13. Oh, this is delicate and lovely, Kris. I love the combination. I guess the clematis must have felt the 'you're about outta here' vibe from you - you scared it into producing! :-D

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    1. That, or giving much of the garden more water than it's seen in recent months definitely did the trick.

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  14. That clematis does deserve a second chance if it produces such pretty flowers! I stop at three chances.... as they say, 'third time lucky' - or not, as the case may be! Love this pearly effect with the Eustoma.

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    1. I think the key factor was probably the amount of irrigation the clematis received. In the long-term, whether or not it stays may depend on how long our drought conditions last.

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