Friday, September 23, 2016

Orchid Show

Last weekend I took a quick trip to my local botanic garden to take a look at the orchid show and sale they'd advertised.  I spent less than an hour there so I can't claim I made a thorough study of the specimens on view but I do have some photos to share.  Here are some of my favorites (all from the local orchid society's show area):

I loved the spots on this Cattleya (labeled as C. caudabel, although I couldn't find a species listing under that name on-line)

The spots and unusual color combination were what attracted me to this Rhyncholaeliocattleya 'Penny's Spot' (Orchid genera names can be a mouthful!)

I liked the unusual flowers of this Dendrochilum magnum

The camera's focus wasn't perfect here but the flowers colors did have a watercolor quality to them.  This is a Laeliocatonia grex Renate 'S&W'.  

Miltassia Aztec 'Nalo', a bigeneric hybrid with Miltonia and Brassia parents, has a nose-like protuberance that gives it the appearance of a face

Miltonia moreliana gives you an indication which parent gave the Miltassia its nose

I loved the color of this Oncidium 'Pacific Sun Spot'


Professional growers had a few display tables:


My profile photo of one grower's Dendrobium 'Andre Nishii' didn't come out but this photo shows the flower's curling form


And here are some of the winning entries among the amateur growers' submissions:

I think the top 2 photos are Dendrobiums.  The plant on the lower left is Vandachostylis 'Deep Blue Sea' and the one on the right is a noID Phalaenopsis.


Of course, there were deals to be had in the sale area and I had to bring a couple of orchids home.

A noID Phalaenopsis with pale yellow, almost green, flowers which almost match the color of the Hoya multiflora 'Shooting Star' I already had in my home office

A noID Oncidium with elaborate yellow, white and red blooms


I'm not very attentive to my orchids but they're surprisingly forgiving plants.  My collection seems to be expanding.

I recently cleaned up and repotted all my orchids, dividing some, and moved most of the collection to a shady corner on the southwest side of the garden.  The shelves my husband made me many years ago, already falling apart, may need to be replaced with a larger version.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

21 comments:

  1. The orchids I inherited from my mother are tucked in the shade, neglected. I did get a flower spike on one Cymbidium and the slippers reward the extra attention, since those are my favourites.

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    1. I've never tried growing any of the slipper orchids. I noticed there were a few for sale at last weekend's event but the price had me moving on. I have a few Cymbidiums and they're the most reliable bloomers.

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  2. Good show, Kris. I had no idea orchids could be so variable and so pretty.

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    1. I recognized some of the orchid genera but many were tagged with name abbreviations so I went looking for translations of those on-line when I got home. I found an 11-page list, each page consisting of 189 genera so I can only imagine the number of species. I was dumbfounded.

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  3. Something must be wrong with me, I just don't "get" orchids. I've never been a fan. (sorry to be a Debbie-downer)

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    1. Well, for someone who loves foliage as much as you do, I can understand your reaction, Loree. By and large, orchid foliage is unimpressive and sometimes even homely. Orchids are all about the flowers.

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  4. I've had a few, still have a few--in my Santa Ana wind climate I think they are best in a conservatory. One of those plants that just don't work with the climate--although the Miltassia I've had outdoors for more than a decade has managed--I have profound respect for it now!

    Like epiphyllums, to be hidden away when out of bloom. Mixed feelings all the way.

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    1. Their greatest asset is their long-lasting blooms, assuming you can get them to bloom. The foliage generally isn't something to give prime-time space to. We're also affected by the Santa Ana winds here but my plants are tucked into a relatively shade corner and, as you noted, brought out only when in bloom.

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  5. They're so beautiful if you can get them to bloom. I repotted one that I bought several years ago and it promptly died. I'm assuming you leave them out all year there?

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    1. Most of my plants are outside, where they can remain all year. Rebloom isn't ever guaranteed but, if they're fed periodically, it's more dependable. "Weakly weekly" is the guideline I was given in the past but mine are lucky if they're fed twice a year. A guy at the orchid show who called himself "Mr Fertilizer" gave me a sample granular fertilizer specifically for orchids, which he claimed feeds the plants for 3 months when sprinkled in the pot. I'm going to try that and see if it makes a difference.

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  6. wow amazing colors of joy so beautiful ,your garden is piece of heaven dear

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  7. My mother had the magic touch with orchids. It's not something I inherited sadly. Most of mine are long gone and I vowed not to get any more. 'Penny's Spot' would give me pause for thought.

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    1. The colors in 'Penny's Spot' entranced me too, Jessica - those are colors I'd never think to combine but somehow they work.

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  8. It's easy to succumb to the allure of orchids. I have a good friend whose orchid collection has grown so large that they are building a new house with a special room to accommodate them!

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  9. I love orchid shows - ours are in March. Can you grow orchids in your trees outside?

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    1. I haven't tried to grow orchids attached to any of our trees. As our humidity tends to be on the low side and rain is sparse, I expect keeping them properly hydrated would be difficult.

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    2. I forgot about your low humidity. You have the warmth, but not the humidity requirements.

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  10. You got some beauties! I love the flowers but don't grow any orchids myself. One can't grow everything, right?

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    1. Right! We both need to keep that in mind when we go shopping, Peter!

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