Friday, April 22, 2016

Earth Day Celebration

Today marks the 46th celebration of Earth Day.  In recognition, I thought I'd take you on a short stroll through my garden, the place where I feel closest to the earth and its needs.

We enter through the gate on the north side, where a dark pink ivy geranium (Pelargonium peltatum) has wended its way up the arbor to merge with the white bower vine (Pandorea jasminoides) and star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides)

The Hairy Canary Clover (Dorycnium hirsutum) has burst into bloom to the delight of the bees

A few specimens of our state flower, the California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), have finally bloomed on the back slope from the seeds I scattered prior to one of our few rainstorms

The slope marking the loosely defined division between our property and that of our neighbor is awash in ice plant blooms (Delosperma cooperi)

Back up on the main level of our backyard, the Easter lily cactus (Echinopsis oxygona) has more blooms

Sunflower seedlings are popping up here and there throughout the garden, presumably planted by the birds

The birds, in this case a Black-headed Grosbeak and a Mourning Dove, have made a lot of use of the fountain through our latest heatwave

I think this fellow may be a Spotted Towhee

Achillea 'Moonshine' is enjoying a banner year in the backyard borders


I hope you've had time to enjoy Earth Day in your own way.  Listening to the news, it's hard not to worry about the earth's future but at least one report offers a positive slant today.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

22 comments:

  1. Beautiful! What a great earth day celebration. That hairy canary clover looks so fuzzy!

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    1. The Hairy Canary clover is another plant I bought primarily for its foliage. It's a great plant in and out of bloom.

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  2. Kris, your garden is fabulous and that view. I have comparatively small Hairy Canary and Delosperma plants. I sure wish I could get them as gorgeous as yours but that's probably an impossibility here in rainy western Oregon. We have a pair of spotted towhee in the backyard. I think their nest is in the neighbor's bamboo. And of course we've got those stupid doves too. :) They're cute in your birdbath. Your potted cactus are amazing. And that pink flowered pelargonium, wowzers! I love it. Happy Earth Day to you! Have a great weekend.

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    1. I'd trade the Hairy Canary Clover and the Delospermum for a bit of your rain any time, Grace!

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  3. You've nurtured a beautiful garden Kris. The birds look so content.

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    1. Birds of all kinds spend lots of time in that fountain but it's hard to photograph them without scaring them off - I count myself lucky whenever I manage a half-decent photo.

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  4. I hadn't thought of using ivy-leaved pelargoniums as a climber. Lovely idea!

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    1. I hadn't planned on using the pelargonium as a climber, Diana - the plant decided to move up in the world all on its own.

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  5. The ivy pelargonium looks good with the other two plants on that arbor.

    Now I want to try that somewhere. The Doryciniums plants you gave me are doing GREAT, by the way, hopefully they will become as beautiful as yours are, when they grow up--thanks again!

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    1. I'm glad the Dorycniums transitioned well, Hoover Boo. I've lost about one in 3 transplants myself. My oldest (and biggest) plant has become a fairly prolific self-seeder but the seedlings resent being moved and they do take their time developing bulk once they're transplanted.

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  6. You're doing your part to sustain and nourish nature (more than most). That's all any if us can do.

    Your garden is truly special.

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    1. Thanks Gerhard. Hopefully, if it comes to it and my neighbor formally protests my trees and other foliage, the city will agree with you.

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  7. I'd have to buy hairy canary clover just because it has such a great name! I have fond childhood memories of hillsides covered in ice plant. Your garden looks great. Hooray for the rain! As for that climbing geranium, I had no idea they did that!

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    1. If you touched that hairy canary clover's foliage, you'd try it just for it's cashmere-soft texture, Tammy! There's been woefully little rain this season but there's another slight chance for some later this week - my fingers are crossed as my rain barrels are seriously depleted.

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  8. It is always a joy to visit your garden, Kris. The birds seem to agree! The slope covered with ice plant is gorgeous. I especially admire it because I have endured the hardships of planting and maintaining a slope before. It is not easy!

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    1. The ice-planted slope is my neighbor's creation, although the upper portion is officially part of our property. I don't remember it blooming that well last year but, after seeing what it looks like now, I may try some in some areas of my front slopes.

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  9. Thanks for sharing this walk around your garden. I too feel close to the earth when I'm in my garden watching what nature is doing. I found the link to growing wisteria as trees and shrubs, I think you could use it with great success to create some extra shade for your plants. http://wifemothergardener.blogspot.it/2012/05/wisteria-at-longwood-thoughts-on.html it also contains other links you may find useful

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    1. Thanks for the link, Christina! I think I do have to do something to cool and shade the soil in the front area - with the trees trimmed back as much as they've been (to accommodate my unreasonable neighbor), everything is getting singed.

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  10. I love your ivy geranium! And all of that ice plant - very impressive and beautiful.

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    1. The ice plant isn't my doing but I'm impressed too!

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  11. Your garden tours always make me happy. I hope you enjoy your space as much as we enjoy seeing your images of it!

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  12. I love my garden, Peter, but my neighbor continues to make me crazy.

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