Monday, January 4, 2021

In a Vase on Monday: Making the most of my Leucadendrons

Pickings in my garden are slim at the moment so, when I looked out my bedroom window Sunday morning and saw yellow blooms glowing in the distance, I immediately knew I was going to cut stems of Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder' for In a Vase on Monday, the popular meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  The Leucadendron's "flowers", which are actually colorful bracts, are a mainstay of my winter garden.

The "coneflowers" are more chartreuse than yellow right now but the color will fade to a butter yellow color with red edges over the next month

Back view: Since last week's rain, the Lotus berthelotii I use as a groundcover started climbing all over everything around it so I decided to pop what I cut back into my arrangement

Top view

Clockwise the upper left: Aeonium 'Sunburst', Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder', Corokia x virgata 'Sunsplash', two varieties of noID paperwhite Narcissi that came with the garden, and Lotus berthelotii.  The Aeonium rosette will be planted in the garden when I toss the rest of the arrangement.

There's quite a bit of pink happening in my garden so I picked some of that too and, although I hadn't planned on it, I ended up including more Leucadendron stems in that arrangement as well.

The centerpiece is Camellia 'Taylor's Perfection', which if off to a slow start this year.  During our late fall stretch of warm, dry weather, the shrub lost most of the buds that developed earlier that season so I suspect it'll be light on blooms this year.

Back view: I love the daisy flowers of the pink Argyranthemum but the the stems are very short for the purposes of flower arranging

Top view: The bracts of Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' and 'Chief' have a bit of pink in them, although they look redder in these photos

Clockwise from the upper left: Argyranthemum 'Angelic Giant Pink', Camellia williamsii 'Taylor's Perfection', Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' and L. salignum 'Chief', Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold', and Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl'

For more IAVOM creations, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party


24 comments:

  1. I said it before and I don't mind saying it again: I love those off-season arrangements, possibly better than those during time of abundance. Both of today's vases are delightful and creative and make me smile!

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    1. Thanks! The arrangements definitely require more thought this time of year.

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  2. Both vases show how effective largely foliage-based vases can be - the difference in leaf colour and shape and texture is a great foil for the token blooms. And it is quite exciting to be seeing narcissus again - are yours grown in pots, or in the ground?

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    1. All my Narcissi are planted in the ground, Cathy. These paperwhite varieties came with the garden and return reliably year-after-year. I introduced a number of larger-flowered varieties after we moved in but they've also done relatively well despite our long dry season and all-too-frequent bouts with drought.

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  3. I love ‘Angelic Giant Pink’ Argyranthemum and ‘Taylor’s Perfection’. leucadendron has such interesting flowers.

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    1. The 'Taylor's Perfection' Camellia is the only one I introduced after moving in and before drought became such a persistent issue. I'd have more Camellias if only we had more regular rain!

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  4. There is always something interesting to pop into your vases. Happy IAVOM.

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  5. Everything is pretty in pink but the Aeonium was a stroke of genius in the first arrangement...cheers to January 20th! Happy New Year.

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    1. That Aeonium almost screamed at me to cut it, Amelia - the plant is steadily being enveloped by agaves on either side of it so cutting and relocating the Aeonium rosettes is in the cards.

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  6. That clear pink is an usual choice for you. (love pink)

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    1. Certain colors seem to appear en masse in my garden, Diana. January is the pink month!

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  7. To my eye, Leucadendron bracts are as cheerful as daisies. The Camellia is lovely, looking very rose-like, and it's nice to see one of my favorite fillers, the ever-useful Coleonema. I find its small flowers very charming.
    I imagine your garden is leaping after the recent rain. More good stuff coming!

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    1. I just stuck a moisture meter into the ground in numerous areas throughout my garden to see if I could get away leaving the irrigation system off for a bit longer. With just a couple exceptions, the soil is already very dry - sandy soil offers great drainage but it's a bit of a liability when rain is in short supply.

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  8. The lime-y green and white arrangement is refreshing, like a bite of key lime pie.

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    1. It seemed a nice change after the excess of red during the holidays too, HB.

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  9. Beautiful arrangements as always Kris. My only experience of paperwhite narcissi is growing them indoors. I do like them although I find I am unable to stay in the same room for long once the flowers open. Hyacinths have the same effect. How great to have them growing out in the garden.

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    1. En masse the fragrance of the paperwhites is a bit much, Anna, but a half dozen stems in a large space hasn't caused me much bother.

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  10. Beautiful arrangements! I especially loved the second one with the pops of pink.

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    1. Thanks Angie! Pink is big in my garden at the moment.

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  11. The camellias are beautiful - they look really delicate although I expect their waxy petals are tougher than they appear? And Pink Pearl - I do think that is so pretty! I am sure your garden will feel a bit refreshed after your recent rainfall Kris! Hope so! I would love to be able to send you some of ours. Life is one big squelch at the moment! Mud everywhere!! Amanda

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    1. Many Camellia blooms actually are relatively fragile and, regrettably, they don't last long in a vase. They also don't handle downpours well, although I still wish we could take some of your rain in the UK off your hands!

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  12. Kris, I'd love to have your choices right now. Nothing here much but rain which I wish we could use to barter an exchange. The photo labeled "Top view: The bracts of Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset' and 'Chief'" is just so charming. You always find such great combinations.

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    1. I was hesitant about adding the Leucadendrons to that very pink arrangement, Susie, but I'm glad I did as the last Camellia gave up and collapsed yesterday.

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