Friday, September 15, 2017

September Scavenger Hunt - Bloom Day Edition

I stepped into the garden to conduct my Bloom Day survey believing once again that I didn't have much going on.  In actuality, there are a lot of plants with blooms but few plants with a lot of blooms.  However, there were a few exceptions.

Gaura lindheimeri is back after being cut back by half in June

The Pennisetums are in their glory.  From left to right are Pennisetum 'Fireworks', P. advena 'Rubrum', and P. orientale

This part of the backyard border is the most floriferous right now.  Gaillardia 'Arizona Sun' and Mimulus 'Fiesta Marigold' occupy the foreground; Leonotis leonurus (also back after a June trim) sits in the background; and Bouteloua gracilis 'Blonde Ambition' is scattered in between.

Bauhinia x blakeana (aka Hong Kong orchid tree) is making its regular September appearance


With the exception of the Gaura, most of the plants shown above were also blooming last month, although less robustly.  There are only a few recent arrivals.

This noID Oncidium produced several bloom stalks for the first time since last December

This variegated rosemary, Rosmarinus 'Gold Dust', just developed flowers

Most of the cutting garden flowers are on the decline but Salvia elegans (aka pineapple sage) has finally produced a mass of flowers


The stars of last month's Bloom Day post - the dahlias, sunflowers, zinnias and Lisianthus - are on their way out.

Clockwise from the left are: Dahlia 'Loverboy', D. 'Little Robert', D. 'Otto's Thrill', D. 'Punkin' Spice', and D. 'Terracotta'.  'Otto's Thrill' and 'Punkin' Spice' produced what seem to be the last of their blooms earlier this month but the other 3 are troopers.

After I cut the head off Helianthus annuus 'Lemon Queen', she produced a large batch of short-stemmed flowers, all clustered tightly around her stem and half-hidden under her leaves

I pulled about a third of my scorched Zinnia elegans after our last heatwave but some are still going strong

Eustoma grandiflorum (Lisianthus) did poorly overall this summer and I'm not sure why as the plants got more water this year than during last year's drought.  The one on the far left is 'Rosanne Black Pearl' but I don't have cultivar names for the others shown here.  The pink, solid blue, yellow and green forms are all MIA.


The tough, virtually ever-blooming plants are still going strong despite the extended heatwave we had from late August into early September.

Cuphea 'Starfire Pink'

Duranta repens 'Sapphire Showers'

Gomphrena decumbens 'Itsy Bitsy'

The large-flowered Grevilleas, left to right: Grevillea 'Ned Kelly', G. 'Peaches & Cream', and G. 'Superb'

The Lantanas also enjoy summer's heat.  From left to right: noID trailing lavender variety, variegated L. 'Samantha', and L. 'Lucky White'

All the ivy geraniums (Pelargonium peltatum) are blooming well


The heatwave may have set back the clematis, which was blooming more heavily last year at this time than it is at present.

Clematis paniculata (aka Sweet Autumn Clematis)


Other tidbits of bloom found during my scavenger hunt can be seen here:

Clockwise from the left: Mandevilla 'Sun Parasol Apricot', Achillea 'Moonshine', Coreopsis 'Redshift', Gaiilardia aristata 'Gallo Peach', Bulbine frutescens 'Hallmark', Cuphea 'Vermillionaire', and Russelia 'Flamingo Park'

Clockwise from the left: Abelia 'Kaleidoscope', Anemone hupehensis japonica, Asparagus fern, Cosmos bipinnatus, noID white Pentas, Tanacetum parthenium, and Zephyranthes candida

Clockwise from the upper left: Argyranthemum frutescens; Correa 'Wyn's Wonder, Gomphrena globosa 'Fireworks', noID violet Pentas, Pseuderanthemum 'Texas Tri-star', and Rosa chinensis "Mutabilis'


Top row: noID Angelonia, Catananche caerulea, and Globularia x indubia
Middle row: Liriope muscari, Lobelia valida, and noID Osteospermum
Bottom row: Salvia macrophylla, Symphyotrichum 'Monch', and Trichostema 'Midnight Magic'


If you're hunting for more flowers to view, visit Carol of May Dreams Gardens, the host of the monthly event that is Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day.


All material © 2012-2017 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

16 comments:

  1. I can hardly get over how much is blooming in your garden. The orchid and the rosemary are both noteworthy for me as I have not had much luck with either one.

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    1. The orchid was a bit of a surprise, Linda. I previously kept it in the house but I took a chance and moved it to a shady spot in the garden and it responded by producing more flowers than I've ever seen on it before. Rosemary loves SoCal but the variegated variety I featured is shyer about blooming than the more prevalent upright and prostrate forms.

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  2. That's alotta floral beauty Kris, I'm in awe once again!

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    1. My monthly flower survey always surprises me a bit, Loree. I should probably whittle down my monthly post to focus just on what's making the biggest splash but the posts do provide me with a useful record.

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  3. Love that leonotis with 'Bright Star' and the eyebrow grasses -- lots still blooming for your, Kris.

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    1. The Leonotis is doing better this year than in any prior year, Denise. Maybe a timely mid-year pruning is the ticket. I can't remember getting a second flush of bloom in prior years.

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  4. I'm always amazed at just how much is flowering in your garden. Love the Leonotis, so happy in your climate!

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    1. Once a week or so, I drive by a garden in a nearby beach city with Leonotis that puts my display to shame, Eliza. It IS well-adapted to our climate.

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  5. Kris, your garden is just gorgeous! The display of blooms is stunning! I definitely am a "flower-centrist" gardener.. Have a wonderful weekend!

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    1. I like the "flower centrist" term, MDN! It's an improvement on some of the terms used here to describe those of us with a great affection for flowers.

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  6. I am really looking forward to fall weather since we've had a few hellish weeks up here after an extremely pleasant August lowered our guard. Fall here means lovely light and pleasant days with a bit of fall foliage thrown into the mix. You have blooms to spare right now !

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    1. We got lulled into a false sense of security about summer's reach during an unusually mild July and August her too, Kathy. And then that miserable extended heatwave arrived in late August and slapped us across the face. It's REALLY pleasant and fall-like (low-to-mid 70s) here right now and I've launched my fall projects with just a bit of trepidation that summer may offer yet another wallop before it's finally over and done with.

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  7. Impressive array of blooms! I'm only a bit envious that your garden will be producing more blooms as fall and winter set in. Glorious Grevellias, heavy sigh.

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    1. I'm incredulous that Grevilleas aren't more popular here in SoCal - they are indeed marvelous shrubs, Peter.

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  8. For someone who did not think there was much blooming, I was shocked! There is so much color. My garden was smashed by Hurricane Harvey then again by Irma but I have enjoyed looking at yours. Thank you for sharing on GBBD.
    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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    1. I always underestimate how much I have in bloom it seems, Jeannie. Thanks for visiting!

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