Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Foliage Follow-up - August 2017

Most of my posts probably scream "flower addict" but foliage is really the dominant feature of my garden.  That's clearest during the mid-to-late summer months when flowers retreat from view.

There are still a few flowers in the front garden but I think this photo shows the importance of foliage here.  The swaths of chartreuse color are provided by Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold' and Duranta repens.  The red tones of Leptospermum 'Copper Glow' are echoed in Pennisetum advena 'Rubrum' and Coprosma 'Fireburst'.  Phormium 'Maori Queen' marries the chartreuse and red colors, helping to tie everything together.

The large clumps of red fountain grass are more visible in this photo.  The magenta seedpods of Cercis occidentalis and the red color of selected succulents on the front-facing slope pick up the red color of the grasses.

The Coprosma 'Fireburst' shown in this photo in front of Phormium 'Maori Queen' and Euphorbia characias 'Black Pearl' was added recently to replace a Grevillea 'Pink Midget' which found this area a bit too dry.  There are 2 other 'Fireburst' shrubs in the same bed already.

Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder' provides more red/orange color in this section of the front garden closer to the south end of the house.  Abelia 'Kaleidoscope' contributes a softer version of the same warm tones elsewhere in the bed and there are more red echoes in the distance, provided by Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' and Pennisetum 'Fireworks'.  The Leucadendron also echoes the chartreuse of the large Duranta behind it.


There were a few individual foliage stand-outs elsewhere I want to highlight this month as well.

After nearly 4 years in this bed in the backyard, 2 of my Agave lophantha 'Quadicolor' have finally produced pups

I planted this Westringia fruticosa 'Morning Light' in just the right spot near the front of the long border in the back garden.  I'm planning to move 2 others forward this fall so they can also shine.

Artemisia ludoviciana seedlings planted themselves in various areas of the garden.  Unsure as to what they were, I moved them to this area in the cutting garden.  They've become a bit tall for the space but their placement has been useful as I frequently include the foliage in floral arrangements as a filler.  I also like how the foliage captures the late afternoon sun.


Pam at Digging hosts Foliage Follow-up each month after Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day.  To see her August foliage picks and those of other gardeners, click here.


All material © 2012-2017 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party


18 comments:

  1. Kris your garden always looks gorgeous! I love all the colors and textures in it: blue, green, yellow, grey, red... absolutely mesmerizing! Monet would love to paint there!

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    1. You're too kind, MDN. Believe me, at this time of year most of my garden is best viewed from a distance rather than in close-ups.

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  2. What MDN said... so many lovely groupings, and lots of droolworthy foliage frame that spectacular view. I wish that fountain grass was hardy here - it is so perfect!

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    1. I do love my fountain grasses. They make a big impression, especially this time of year.

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  3. I would definitely lump you in the "flower floozy" category, but your photos (gorgeous by the way) prove you are also an accomplished foliage gardener.

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    1. The ideal plant for me flowers at some point but has great foliage year-round. Although I bought Leptospermum 'Copper Glow' for its gorgeous foliage, I was pleased when it produced an early summer spray of white flowers.

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  4. Just beautiful, Kris. You know I don't plant mainly for flowers, so I'd call the front garden done as is!

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    1. Thanks, Denise! Because the front garden gets seen the most, I made a point of emphasizing foliage over flowers there as I don't want big holes in the landscape when flashy seasonal floral displays are over.

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  5. A newcomer would never know this used to be lawn! Spectacular.

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    1. Ha! I've almost forgotten the lawn myself, despite having spent hours upon hours digging it up.

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  6. Great form and colors, but boy, it looks hot! I expect the weather will be cooling down soon?

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    1. Since June's heatwaves, it's actually been a fairly mild summer here, Eliza. (I hope I'm not jinxing us by saying so!) Our temperatures have been in the low-mid 80sF for the most part, although humidity has been higher than normal of late. Right now, at nearly noon, it's just 75F (with 60% humidity). If I thought it'd stay like this, I'd swing into my fall projects now!

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  7. Looking good! I use a similar gardening philosophy, selecting things that flower at some point but have attractive foliage or bark or some interest all year. At least I try. Some things die back completely in the summer, some in the winter. My garden is looking a little sleepy right now, flower-wise, as well, though the Coreopsis tinctoria and yarrow are making a pretty big statement in one area.

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    1. I'm noticing more dead/dying plants as the summer progresses too but, rather than a reaction to heat, I think most is related to variable water delivery by our irrigation system. Oh well, more spaces for new plants when fall arrives.

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  8. You really have a fabulous garden Kris.

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    1. Thanks Susie. I'm afraid I mainly see its deficiencies at this time of year but fall is just around the corner (I hope).

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