Monday, November 7, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Three for Cathy

Cathy of Rambling in the Garden is celebrating the third anniversary of "In a Vase on Monday," a popular meme that encourages gardeners to put together arrangements from materials they have on hand.  I joined in for the first time at the end of March 2014.  I've been impressed by Cathy's commitment to the weekly exercise and the congeniality she's inspired among participants.  Cathy suggested a theme, "three," for this week's post so, unable to think of a more creative angle, I have 3 vases this week, each featuring my favorite flower, Eustoma grandiflorum (aka Lisianthus).

Vase #1 is the most ambitious:

This could be either the front or the back but this side of the arrangement highlights Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream'

While this side gives the pale yellow Eustoma greater opportunity to flaunt her stuff

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains: Eustoma grandiflorum, Abelia 'Kaleidoscope', Achillea 'Appleblossom', Correa 'Wyn's Wonder', Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream', Nandina domestica berries, and Tanacetum parthenium


Vase #2 is the simplest:

It may not be immediately evident but this vase contains 3 different tonal variations of pink Eustoma

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains: 3 variations of pink Eustoma grandiflorum (only 2 of which are shown in close-up), Coprosma repens 'Plum Hussey', Gomphrena globosa 'Fireworks', and Helichrysum petiolare minus 'Silver Mist'


Vase #3 features the last of the purplish blue Eustoma:

The blue Eustoma are looking a trifle ragged but I thought them worthy of one last hurrah

The plant I call "hairy blue eyeballs" was moved to the back of the vase as its dusty white color doesn't show to advantage next to the bright white of the daisies I included

Top view

This final vase contains: Eustoma grandiflorum, Barleria obtusa, Globularia x indubia, Leucadendron 'Pisa', and Salvia chamaedryoides 'Marine Blue'


Last week's succulent-topped pumpkin has been moved aside for the time being to give me sufficient space to scatter this week's vases throughout the house.



To see how Cathy is celebrating her third "IaVoM" anniversary, visit her at Rambling in the Garden.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

32 comments:

  1. Oh, a vase for each of your lisianthus - always a pleasure to see them, and what an abundance of blooms you have in your garden at the moment, so very different from our UK gardens which are winding down now. Thanks for sharing and for your continued support

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    1. The Lisianthus are, at last, beginning to peter out, although it's possible that you might see one more round of the yellow or pink variety before the month is out as there are still a few buds left.

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  2. Your three vases all have very distinct personalities! They also look so summery when I'm stuck in a very autumn world....(yes, that's jealousy)

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    1. We experience autumn in the form of shorter days and cooler nights (and the return of the bloody raccoons) but not necessarily cool days. We could reach 90F on Wednesday! Still, I'd be happy to exchange some of our warmth for some of your rain, Loree.

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  3. I love all three of these vases; I remain very jealous of the Eustomer - of the seed I sowed last year I have 2 very small plants that I hope to nurse through the winter, I have already sown the seed that was left from last year and germination is better but they are tiny seedlings and grow very slowly if I ever see them as plants I will buy them and hope that they would be perennial for me. Yours a just beautiful and I'm sure give you a lot of pleasure.

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    1. Well, I applaud you for getting the Eustoma seeds to germinate, Christina - I didn't manage that feat! I've read that the plants are difficult from seed and your experience confirms that. I wonder if the wholesale growers have some kind of secret propagation technique?

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  4. Wonderful, everytime I see the Blue Lisianthus, I wonder where the heck the Blue Roses came from. Love the blue arrangement the most!

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    1. The double forms of Lisianthus really do look very rose-like, especially in photos. Sadly, of all of them, the dark blue form seems the least resilient. While the pink forms reappeared in spring with little help from me, only one little blue-flowered plant made it from last year to this one and it produced only a single small flower.

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  5. Ah Kris, I've missed seeing your Eustoma, they remind me of soft and delicate roses - beautiful.

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  6. The soft colors of the first vase makes this one my favorite, so lovely. Love seeing the eustoma and a close-up of the gomphrena is much appreciated. I've always admired that plant.

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    1. Gomphrena 'Fireworks' and 'Itsy Bitsy' have been vigorous growers in my garden this year. 'Fireworks' reportedly self-seeds but, as this is its first year in my garden, confirmation is pending. 'Itsy Bitsy' acts like a short-lived perennial but I've no sign of self-seeding from it yet.

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  7. Peaches 'n cream is a Take Me Home!

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    1. 'Peaches & Cream' seems to be ecstatic about the removal of the Ceanothus I wrote about in my prior post. I swear that the number of flowers has quadrupled in the short period since that hedge was removed.

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  8. They're all beautiful. Love those grevilleas and the deep blue eustomas always tug at my heart. Sad to hear that they're done for the year.

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    1. The blue Eustoma are done but there may be a few more pink and yellow ones to come ;)

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  9. Your vases are always so artistic, Kris. All so beautiful but I love the first one, that Grevillea took my breath away! Don't think I could grow it here though, pity. Have a good week, Annette

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    1. No, I'm afraid the Australian-bred Grevillea wouldn't like your winter temperatures, Annette.

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  10. I love the fact that your vases always look good from all angles! The first is a definite favourite - the Grevillea and cream Eustoma were made for each other and you have chosen the perfect vase for them too. :)

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    1. Luckily, that Grevillea has ramped up its flower production!

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  11. Three vases, three winners, all lovely. Well done Kris.

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  12. As always your vases are so colourful and elegant Kris. You've encouraged me to have a go at trying to grow eustoma next year :)

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    1. I hope you can find the Eustoma in plugs, Anna. They're miserable to start from seed. Christina of myhesperidesgarden got a couple of plants to germinate this year but it sounds as though she's at least a year away from flowers. Still, she did better than I did with seed germination.

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  13. Wonderful--just love that first vase. As Chloris said, 3 vases, three winners!

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  14. As well as the star Eustomas (and of course that magnificent Grevillea bloom), I'm loving some of the smaller players. The Correa flowers, Achillea, Barleria, and the Gomphrena... It's lovely how you've combined them!

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    1. The Correa, Barleria and Gomphrena are great plants that might work for you too, Amy. The Achillea is more foliage than flowers thus far but I may have the plants in too little sun.

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  15. I can see why you are so taken with Lisianthus. It looks so fulsome. You've created three really beautiful vases.

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    1. Lisianthus has proven its value here - it can handle some heat and stingy irrigation and still looks beautiful.

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