Monday, January 18, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Shy Grevillea

Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' has been covered with buds for a couple of weeks and I fixated on using it in a vase even though I usually loathe cutting the blooms.  The problem is that the flowers appear in clusters, generally blooming one at a time but, once the stems are cut, the unopened buds never seem to bloom.  Still, there are quite a few buds on the shrub in my front garden so I gathered my courage and cut the stem with the smallest number of unopened flowers.

Front view

Back view (showing one of the unopened flowers)

Top view (showing another unopened flower)


The Grevillea bloom complements the rest of the cast but doesn't overwhelm any of them.  In fact, some of the other plant materials, like the Nandina berries, had to be shifted about so they didn't steal the stage.  Here's a closer look at what I included:

Clockwise from top left: Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream', Coprosma repens 'Inferno', Leucadendron salignum 'Chief', Leucodendron 'Wilson's Wonder', berries of Nandina domestica, and noID Narcissus


The vase assumed the position occupied by last week's arrangement in the front entry.  As expected, the Calliandra (pink powder puff) blooms in last week's vase survived only a few days but the rest of the plant material carried on for the balance of the week.  I wonder if I can expect more of the Grevillea?

Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden, the host of "In a Vase on Monday" to see what she and other gardeners have going on this week.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

36 comments:

  1. How interesting it doesn't bloom once cut...but I like both the opened and unopened flowers of the Grevillea...and I love both views of this vase.

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    1. The same seems to be true of the other large-flowered Grevillea, 'Superb', unfortunately.

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  2. What an interesting flower!I have not seen Grevillea in gardens in my area.My Nandina domestica has no berries, I do not know why.

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    1. Grevilleas are native to Australia, Anca, which is probably why you don't see them. As coastal southern California, where I live, is a Mediterranean climate I can grow many of the plants grown in certain areas of Australia, South Africa and other regions that share that climate.

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  3. I sympathize about cutting long-lasting flowers, Kris, but I console myself with being able to revisit the flowers in the photos later. The Grevillea is so lovely in flower but the buds are also very lovely with their pale blue-green color and architectural. The addition of the Leucadendrons, daffodils, and abundant Nandina berries makes a really smashing bouquet.

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    1. I'm comforted that there's still one fully open flower on the shrub and many, many unopened flowers, Hannah.

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  4. Hi Kris, gosh, that Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' is so beautiful! And I love that you combined it with white Narcissus.
    Your observation is interesting that if you cut one grevillea stem with other flowers on it, the unopened ones won't open properly. I wonder what mother nature had in mind by doing so? With roses for example that is usually no problem at all.
    Pretty gray and gloomy day here in San Diego, but unfortunately no rain in the forecast :-(. Where is El Nino?
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I understand that the El Nino rains have been forestalled by a ridge of high pressure, Christina. Maybe it's the same phenomenon the forecasters called the "ridiculously resilient ridge' last year but, whatever it's called, I wish it would go away!

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    1. The flowers never disappear here (even when we humans think it's cold!).

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  6. Yes, the grevillea is pretty whether the buds are open or not - and I think we are getting braver with what we cut for our Monday vases, aren't we?! Love the nandina berries too. Thanks for sharing - always lovely to see a very different selection of blooms and foliage

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    1. If I ever get all 3 of my Grevillea "Peaches & Cream' shrubs blooming at once, you may eventually see multiple stems, Cathy, but until then, I'll probably continue to be a bit miserly with them!

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  7. You're so brave to cut your grevillea. They look beautiful in your vase in foliage, bud, and bloom. The rest of the arrangement is gorgeous as well!

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    1. You should have seen how much dilly-dallying I did before I cut that Grevillea Stem, Peter!

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  8. I look at your vase and think the Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder' is what I would be hesitant to cut, wanting to enjoy it on the plant. My feelings are probably based purely on the fact my G. 'Peaches and Cream' blooms fairly reliably, where as getting a Leucadendron to bloom around here seems nearly impossible.

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    1. It's all about volume, I guess, Loree. The older of my 2 Leucadendron 'Wilson's wonder' is HUGE - much larger than the projected size - and full of stems with cones. My only hesitation about cutting it this time was that it's not reached its peak of winter color yet.

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    2. Ha! That makes perfect sense. Tell you what, cut a bunch of stems and ship them up here, I'll sell them for $3.99 ea and split the profit with you...

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    3. I'd have to invest in a lot more Leucadendrons (e.g. plant the entire slope with 'Wilson's Wonder') to make that enterprise profitable ;)

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  9. So pretty! I'm impressed by the variety of your vases from week to week. This one looks totally different from the one last week. What variety you have in your garden!

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    1. Actually, the Narcissus may be the only "odd man out" among the plants I've used the past 2 weeks, Renee - the rest mostly hail from Mediterranean regions - but it always amazes me to see the diversity of plants you can find wherever you go.

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  10. That Grevillea is a beaut! I've never seen it before. Wonderfully interesting vase.

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    1. "Peaches & Cream' has the largest flowers I've seen in the Grevillea genus but all the flowers are interesting, Sandra (not that I've seen all of what's out there).

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  11. I may live only 30 miles or so some the Mediterranean sea but your climate is much more Mediterranean than mine! Thanks for the ID on my Grevillea, they must be a very varied species, I think Cathy (Absent Gardener) is correct in her ID of it being G. rosemarinifolia. Your Greviliiea is stunning in bud and in flower.

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    1. I expect Cath has more experience with the genus than I do so her guess is likely to be closer to the mark. Upon reflection, your plant looks to have shorter leaves than I've seen on G. 'Noelii'. I have one G. alpina x rosmarinifolia hybrid with similar leaves, although different flowers. The Grevillea genus is quite large I think. I've only been collecting the plants for a few years but I've already accumulated 9 different varieties, encompassing several species and numerous hybrids. I hesitate even to count the number of individual plants!

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  12. Such a tropical theme, Kris, I like it a lot. What fascinates me most of all with the meme is the huge diversity, such an inspiration! PS: Very difficult to comment with WP, tried several times. Greetings from Annette's Garden :)

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    1. I'm sorry about the difficulty in posting your comment, Annette. I know that Blogspot and Wordpress seem to have perennial interface problems - whether that's by design or default, I don't know but it's annoying to be sure!

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  13. Glad you shared your Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' today. It is really gorgeous at this stage. I think I'll look for Leucadendron to try--it looks great with the other materials. And I'm happy to see the pretty narcissus.

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    1. There are a lot of beautiful Leucadendron species, Susie, with colors ranging from silver to the deepest burgundy, but you'd probably have to winter it in a greenhouse in your climate.

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  14. I do hope the Grevillea lasts a few days Kris - it really is gorgeous and I can understand your hesitation at cutting it. Lovely to enjoy it close up for a while though. A very pretty combination of pale greens and those bright red berries. :)

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    1. Thanks, Cathy! As it's raining (yay!) and I haven't spent much time outside the past 2 days to appreciate the flowers on the shrub, it is nice to be able to enjoy them inside.

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  15. I first saw Grevillea on my recent visit and fell in love with it, such a striking plant. Your vase is very lovely per usual, Kris. All the components compliment each other so well. :-) I love learning about all the plants in your climate!

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    1. There are so many Grevillea species and hybrids to love, Eliza. I feel as though I've just begun exploring the possibilities.

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  16. The sequence of colors on the grevillea is so beautiful... I think you did wonders balancing out the colors in this vase, Kris :)

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    1. The color of the Grevillea flowers change quite a bit as the flowers mature, Amy. At it's peak, the 'Peaches & Cream' flower is more peach than cream.

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  17. That grevillea is stunning, I love the Nandina berries too. Such a pretty arrangement.

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  18. You make the best bouquets. Grevillea has really beautiful and unique looking flowers.

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