Monday, June 15, 2015

Bloom Day - June 2015

With early heatwaves in March followed by unusually cool weather through early June, my garden is mixed up this year.  Some summer bloomers, like the Agapanthus, got off to an early start but others, like the dormant Hemerocallis 'Sammy Russell' have been slow to get going.  The late rain we received, little as it was, also made a difference, encouraging some flowers, like the Osteospermum, to return for a repeat performance.  This is a long-winded way of saying: the garden is full of flowers this June.

The flowers I'm most excited about are a mixed group, some old favorites and others new introductions.

I can't help but be impressed, as I am each year, by the legion of Agapanthus in bloom

After disappointing results from Agastache in prior years, I've fallen in love with the 2 varieties shown here: A. 'Summer Glow' and A. 'Sunset'

While some of the Hemerocallis have been slow to get started, there are still a lot of them to add interest - clockwise from the top left: 'For Pete's Sake', 'Dallas Star', 'Frank Gladney', 'Indian Giver', 'Persian Market', 'Russian Rhapsody', 'Spanish Harlem' and 'Sammy Russell'

This noID bearded Iris is exciting mainly because it's the only one in my garden that has bloomed this year

I'm very happy with the exuberant Lotus berthelotii in a pot - it's almost uncontrollable here when planted in the ground

Melaleuca thymifolia is putting on a fine show this year, its second in my back border

I love the cerulean blue of this Salvia macrophylla but it's very hard to photograph

Solanum xanti, a California native, shown here with Leucadendron 'Pisa' and Salvia 'Amistad', continues to be one of my favorite plants


Some plant genera are making big shows throughout the garden:

The Cupheas: 'Carribean Sunset', 'Strybing Sunset' and 'Starfire Pink'

The Gazanias: (clockwise from upper left) 'New Day Yellow', unspecified orange from the 'Flame' series, 'Sunbathers Otomi' and 'Kiss Me White Flame'

There are buds but no blooms on Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' this month but those that are blooming include G. alpina x rosmarinifolia, G. 'Ned Kelly' and G. 'Superb'

I have a few Fuchsia: F. thymifolia, 'Neon & White Windchimes', and 'Swingtime'

The Eustoma grandiflorum are just getting started but the white and pink forms are already making a splash

Lantana of various types are adding summer color

The Nasturium (Tropaeolum) I grew from seed bloomed - these are the only seeds that make it past the raccoons in the garden beds

The cooler weather in May brought back the Osteospermum for another run

The ever-present Pelargoniums are blooming in earnest

Even the succulents have joined in


But that's not all!  Here are a few more, organized by color:

Top row: Achillea 'Moonshine', Anigozanthos (noID), and Argyranthmum 'Butterfly'
Middle row: Cotula 'Big Yellow Moon', Cotula 'Tiffendell Gold' and a Cymbidium (noID)
Bottom row: Euphorbia 'Dean's Hybrid', Halimium x pauanum, and Jacobaeus maritima


Clockwise from top left: Anagallis 'Wildcat Mandarin', Bignonia capreolata, Digiplexis 'Illumination Flame' and Russelia equisetiformis

Top row: Albizia julibrissin, Alstromeria (noID), and Arctotis 'Pink Sugar'
Middle row: Centranthus ruber, Hebe 'Wiri Blush', and Heuchera (noID)
Bottom row: California poppies, 'Pink Meidiland' rose and Salvia 'Wendy's Wish'

Top row: Arthropodium cirratum, Gaura lindheimeri, and Geranium 'Biokovo'
Middle row: Lagurus ovatus and Leucanthemum x superbum (2 forms)
Bottom row: Magnolia grandiflora, Trifolium repens, and Hoya 'Shooting Star'

Top row: Ageratum corybosum, Aster frikartii, and Duranta (noID)
Middle row: Geranium 'Tiny Monster', Pericallis stellata, and rosemary
Bottom row: Teucrium x lucidrys, Tulbaghia violacea, and Wahlenbergia with Nierembergia


You'll find even more blooms by visiting Carol at May Dreams Gardens, the host of the monthly event that is Bloom Day.  As it's Monday, it's also the day to put forward a bouquet for "In a vase on Monday," the popular meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  Here's mine:

A hasty construction of blooms from a recently purchased Digiplexis 'Berry Canary' accompanied by Abelia x grandiflora, Eustoma grandiflorum 'Echo Pink', Pentas 'Kaleidoscope Appleblossom' and Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' (photographed with my ceramic frog sprouting Rhipsalis)

All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

47 comments:

  1. An amazing array of beautiful blooms! So much to love in your garden. I especially liked the feathery blooms of Melaleuca thymifolia!

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    1. I was worried that Melaleuca wasn't going to come to much - its foliage is still wispy but then it bloomed. Those flowers are something else!

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  2. Drought? What drought? Seriously, it's a magnificent display. I'm taken with Agastache 'Summer Glow' and I wish my agapanthus were so floriferous.

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    1. The Agapanthus are relatively drought tolerant once established and these have been in place a long time. You may not believe it but I think the drought has affected them even so - there were even more flowers in earlier years.

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  3. So much material available for your fabulous vase arrangements Kris :) that Lotus looks great in the pot!

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    1. I love the Lotus in a pot - it's almost scary how fast it grows in the ground here, though. I had to pull it out as it was covering everything in its path.

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  4. I'm impressed with your Agapanthus too. I planted it here last year and it failed to come back. I love all of your flowers, but my favorite has to be that Anagallis 'Wildcat Mandarin,' what a showstopper! Glad to see you got some blooms from the Nasturtiums that you sowed, that's another favorite reseeding annual of mine. Let them go to seed and they may pop up all over next year. Or in your case, maybe immediately. Also, don't tell me that Cymbidium is in the ground?

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    1. No, the Cymbidium isn't in the ground (crowding the bulbs reportedly encourages them to bloom); however, it does spend all year outside ;)

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  5. Kris your garden is a feast for pollinators and all of us. I have a secret longing to grow Agapanthus which I can't so if I ever live in a warmer climate and have a small garden it will have Agapanthus. I cannot get over the variety of blooms so many I never get to see so I love to linger of the pictures...my nasturtiums have leaves that are just emerging so I hope with the rain and warm weather they will jump into high gear soon and start producing those delicious flowers. Here's to a glorious Bloom Day in your garden with a stunning vase to boot!

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    1. I bet you could grow Agapanthus in a pot in your greenhouse, donna - there are some smaller varieties that wouldn't take up too much room.

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  6. Oh I enjoyed perusing your magnificent June blooms Kris some of which I've never come across so must find out more. I imagine they will probably be varieties that our climate will not entertain the idea of us growing on this side of the pond :) I'm guessing that a digiplexis is some sort of digitalis cross. Love the little frog.

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    1. The Digiplexis is a cross between Digitalis and Isoplexis, Anna. It's properly classified as a Digitalis under current naming conventions but it's usually distinguished by growers as "Digiplexis."

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  7. Just a short comment to congratulate you, Kris, for growing such a beautiful garden! I will revisit your post later these days as there is plenty of information that I find very useful.And the vases are simply beautiful!

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    1. Thanks Anca. We have very different climates but I hope you'll discover some plants that might also work for you.

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  8. What a wonderful garden you must have right now with all those colourful flowers! I shall have to go back and take another look! :)

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    1. Like an addict, after every Bloom Day, Cathy, I find myself thinking "I really must put more emphasis on foliage in the future."

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  9. How lovely to see all your blooms as well as your vase, Kris - you hare having such a bountiful June! I have not heard of Digiplexis before but Google tells me it is a kind of foxglove hybrid - looks lovely. Is it a perennial? You have used a lovely vase for your lovely blooms, Kris!

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    1. Yes, Digiplexis (properly classified as Digitalis) is a hybrid of Digitalis and Isoplexis. It's perennial here; however, I had problems with mealybug infestations with it last year and had to start afresh (but then I have mealybug problems with a lot of foxgloves here). It was named "Plant of the Year" at Chelsea several years ago but it seems more popular in the US than the UK.

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  10. Wow². I can't believe how many things are in bloom in your garden. Wonderful photos.

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    1. Thanks Gerhard. I did throw in some succulent flowers, although I'm afraid they got short shrift in this post.

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  11. Man o man, you have a lot going on there Kris ! I've been trying find A. 'Summer Glow ' for ages..Think I'm going to check High Country . Do you have those Cupheas in full sun ? I bought one last year and planted it in mostly shade, but it has never bloomed. I think I need to move it. Happy Bloom Day !

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    1. I have the 12 (!!!) Cuphea 'Starfire Pink', Kathy, and some receive a bit of shade but most are in full sun. They definitely flower best here in full sun with regular irrigation, although I have 3 that limp by with less water and more shade in my dry garden. The orange Cupheas are new to me (most planted this past fall) - 'Carribean Sunset', which is flowering more heavily, gets sun most of the day but the 3 'Strybing Sunset' are holding their own with mostly afternoon sun.

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  12. Kris, what an abundance of blooms you have in your garden. It is clearly summer! My top favorite is the Eustoma grandiflorum. I just love, love, love the huge white flowers and have to browse the local nurseries to see if they carry them in my neck of the woods as well! The Agastache 'Summer Glow' is a very pretty variety and the different Nasturtiums are so cheerful. Do you use them in your cooking?
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I've tried Nasturtiums in salads, Christina, but I haven't used them as edibles otherwise. I hope you can find the Eustoma - it's often sold as Lisianthus so you may want to ask for that. The double forms are becoming more common but single forms are also sold, often in 6-packs.

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  13. I'm speechless. I don't even know where to begin in commenting on that abundance of blooms! I will say that if you can grow fuchsias, you should give Glumicalyx a try.

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    1. I really shouldn't grow Fuchsias, Evan - they're too water-hungry but I was weak. The 'Swingtime' cultivar is in pots that get extra attention and water. 'Windchimes' is already starting to crisp and it hasn't gotten really hot here yet - it probably won't last out the year. Fuchsia thymifolia was resilient in my old garden so I'm hoping that, in the shade, I might just be able to hang onto it.

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  14. I know I shouldn't have been thinking about such practical matters when there were dozens and dozens of gorgeous flowers to enjoy but.....but I can't help but wonder how long it took you to take all those photos and upload/label them. You are a dedicated gardener and blogger (with a beautiful garden).

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    1. I usually take the photos here and there over the course of 2-3 days as time permits so that's not onerous. Labeling the photos is the most time-consuming part of the process but I use my own short-hand for most and I've kept it up mainly because it's helpful to me when I want to go back and check my history with a particular plant. Creating the collages has been something I started playing with recently and, while simple, choosing which photos to combine adds to the time commitment and it's likely to get old fast. However, on the plus side, the exercise is helping me remember all those proper plant names and my brain can use that kind of work-out.

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  15. Oh my goodness what a plethora of flowers, so well done & all gorgeous!!

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  16. I'm a little overwhelmed and second DangerGarden's comment - what a commitment this demonstrates! Not only to the garden, but to keeping all the plant names straight and past that to putting the effort in to report it all in this format. Color. Me. Impressed!

    Here's hoping the weather is kind for the rest of the month. These blossoms (and their amazing caretaker) deserve no less.

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    1. The Bloom Day posts are my biggest time investment in the blogging process - I still see them as a photographic record, as much for myself as for anyone who reads my posts. The wide shots post also became a major production for a time but I've been trimming that effort back, trying to highlight just a few areas each month with a full-blown effort just once a quarter.

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  17. Your Lotus bertheloti looks excellent in that pot, and how cool are Melaleuca thymifolia's blooms? I feel I've seen the name around here a bit, I might just have to grab one the next time I see it. They look so feathery! And whatever the maroon/burgundy succulent is with the yellow flowers, it's a fascinating colour combination.

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    1. The Melaleuca has unique flowers, or at least they're unique in my experience. The maroon succulent with the yellow flowers is Crassula radicans 'Small Red'. The foliage turns from green to that rich red color in the sun.

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  18. Fabulous flowers, and some plants I want to try like the Solanum. The potted Lotus--happiest I have ever seen it. Bit dry for it here.

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    1. Roger's had a new supply of Solanum when I was there last weekend.

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  19. I bet at some point the agastaches will be convinced what a good growing site you have for them, open and sunny, breezy, and should take off for you. I haven't seen that Dean's Hyb euphorb locally, such a good one. I agree, what an undertaking a Bloom Day post is for you!

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    1. My local Armstrong had the 'Dean's Hybrid' Euphorbia in 4-inch pots a week or so ago. Yes, Bloom Day is a major effort for me but I imagine that fervor will cool as my garden matures.

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  20. What a gorgeous array! I really enjoyed the Albizia and the Digiplexus in your vase is wonderful (always enjoy the eustoma that seem to do so well for you. But the agapanthus - something I can dream of tonight!

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    1. I have a dysfunctional relationship with the Albizia, Cathy. It's admittedly pretty in leaf and bloom but it is one of the messiest trees on earth. It also self-seeds freely, seemingly intent on world domination. I just notice a 2-foot tall "seedling" on my neighbors property so now I need to convince them to allow me to dig it up before it starts taking hostages.

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  21. The garden is looking truly splendid. I'm glad the agastaches are behaving themselves for you. I think they sulk till their second year but soon make up for it! The way you have organised the blooms by colour is spectacular: I love the Anagallis 'Wildcat Mandarin' - it's not a pimpernel I've seen before (actually pimpernels are very uncommon here)

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    1. Thanks Matt! I've only found that Anagallis in one plant nursery - the same place had it in stock both last year and this one but it hasn't shown up any place else, which is weird. I hope you're right about the Agastache - the others I've had were short-lived, only lasting a couple of years.

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  22. Just an amazing display Kris. I'm so envious of your Agapanthus. Would love to grow it but even the sales person at my favorite nursery advised me against buying one several years ago, and I've not seen them there again.

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    1. It surprises me that Agapanthus aren't suitable to your climate, Susie, but I guess your winters must be much colder than ours.

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  23. So many colours and shades in your garden. I love the Indian Giver daylily. The Purple is so deep and draws attention.

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  24. That daylily is a favorite of mine as well. I coveted it for years but it's pricey so I didn't indulge in a purchase until last year, when I picked up 2 bare-root plants. The one I photographed shows the color the plant is known for but the other looks like a faded copy.

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  25. Wow! You have so much in bloom. How fun to scroll down through your garden. And on the tech side - I like your photo groups - I can't figure out how to do that with blogspot.

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