Monday, February 15, 2021

IAVOM and Bloom Day Intersection

Two of my favorite memes, In a Vase on Monday and Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, intersect once again this month.  This means a longer than usual post, especially as the floral parade is already getting started in my area of coastal Southern California.  The good news is that I'll limit the commentary that usually accompanies my photos.

I'll start with this week's floral arrangements for In a Vase on Monday, hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

The Anemone that provides the focal point here wasn't the bulb I ordered but at least it was appropriate for a Valentine's Day arrangement.  Front, top and back views are shown.  The contents include: Anemone coronaria 'Bicolore', noID Antirrhinum majus, Calliandra haematocephala, Grevillea lavandulacea 'Penola', Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', and Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl.

The second arrangement took advantage of the first of the Freesias to bloom.  The contents include: Agryranthemum frutescens, white and yellow Freesias, noID Narcissus, Senna artemisioides, and Westringia fruticosa 'Morning Light'.

Moving on to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens, I'll start with the plants that are putting on the best floral show this month.  Unlike much of the US, we haven't faced freezes or snow.  We also have had woefully little rain but that's a whole other issue.

Anemone coronaria grown from corms planted in November.  Clockwise from the upper left: 'Mistral Azzurro', 'The Bride', 'Mistral Bicolore', and 'Lord Lieutenant'.

Arctotis 'Pink Sugar'

Calliandra haematocephala (aka pink powder puff)

Coleonema puchellum 'Sunset Gold'

Echium handiense 'Pride of Fuerteventura'

The smaller-flowered Grevillea have taken off this month.  Clockwise from the upper left: G. alpina x rosmarinifolia, G. 'Poorinda Leane', G. sericea, G. lavandulacea 'Penola', a close-up of G. 'Scarlet Spite', and a wider view of the same plant in the landscape

The large-flowered Grevillea never stop.  Left to right: 'Ned Kelly', 'Peaches & Cream', and 'Superb'.

Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl'

It'll be time to cut back the "flowering" Leucadendrons soon.  Top row: Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset'.  Bottom row: Leucadendron 'Wilson's Wonder' and L. 'Summer Red', which shifted from blonde to red this month.

Osteospermums prefer cool temperatures.  Clockwise from the top left: '4D Silver', two views of 'Violet Ice, 'Berry White', 'Zion Copper Amethyst', a self-seeded mix, and a self-seeded pink variety.

Pyrus calleryana (aka ornamental pear)

Rosmarinus officinalis 'Gold Dust'


A couple of plants deserve special mention.

Isopogon anemonifolius, planted in 2018, has bloomed only once before but it appears to be preparing to do so again

At last xMangave 'Silver Fox' is blooming.  It's bloom spike first appeared in August!  Whether it'll emulate its Agave parent (and die after blooming) or its Manfreda parent (and live on) has yet to be determined.


A couple of plant species are just beginning their bloom cycle, leaving me more to look forward to as the month continues.

The first Freesia and Helleborus 'Red Lady'


As usual, I've organized the best of the rest of what's blooming in my garden in color collages.

Clockwise from the upper left: Felicia aethiopica, Lavandula dentata (I think), L. multifida, Limonium perezii, Polygala fruticosa, and Trichostemma 'Midnight Magic'

Clockwise from the upper left: Argyranthemum frutescens, Coleonema album, Crassula multicava 'Red', Gazania 'White Flame'', Trifolium (aka common clover), and Westringia fruticosa 'Morning Light'

Clockwise from upper left: Aeonium arboreum, noID Cymbidium, Euphorbia rigida, Euryops chrysanthemoides 'Sonnenschein', noID Gazania, Lomanda 'Breeze', and Senna artemisioides

Clockwise from the top left: Aloe deltoideodonta, A. striata, Alstroemeria 'Indian Sunset', Bignonia capreolata, Bryophyllum fedtschenkoi, and noID Kalanchoe

Clockwise from the upper left: Antirrhinum majus, self-seeded Gazania, Gomphrena decumbens 'Itsy Bitsy', Lobelia laxiflora, Metrosideros collina 'Springfire', and Ribes viburnifolium (aka Catalina perfume currant)

Top row: Arctostaphylos bakeri 'Louis Edmunds', Argyranthemum frutescens, and Bauhina x blakeana
Middle row: last noID Camellia sasanqua, C. williamsii 'Taylor's Perfection', and Centranthus ruber
Bottom row: noID Cyclamen, Hemerocallis 'Russian Rhapsody', and Jasminum polyanthum


For more GBBD posts, visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens.  For more IAVOM posts, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2021 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party


46 comments:

  1. The flowers and bouquets are gorgeous. Thanks!

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  2. It seems unreal to have so many blooms right now. I doubt there is a single one here. We still have a foot of snow on the ground but it should start to melt today.

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    1. It's a whole different world down here, Phillip. I hope conditions warm in your area soon.

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  3. Oh my goodness! It does look like you are in a different hemisphere! Your blooms are a very welcomed sight and all so beautiful! Here on Long Island, we look like a winter wonderland!

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    1. At least you're used to cold, snowy winters, Lee. I'm afraid some gardeners in Texas and the Pacific Northwest are in shock.

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  4. Always interesting to see the bigger picture of your garden Kris - but what an intriguingly eclectic mix of plants for this time of year! I have not seen bicoloured anemones like that before and I love the way you have used the other material to highlight the red in them. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Late winter here often looks like spring in other parts of the world, Cathy. I like Anemone 'Bicolore' even if it wasn't what I ordered, although I'm not sure what I'll pair it with once the snapdragons are gone.

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  5. Thank you for the tour of your current blooms! I absolutely love the Anemone ‘Mistral Bicolore’! In fact, I just added it to my Wishlist perhaps for next year, as it probably is too late to order, receive, and then plant. What do you think? The vase with Anemone ‘Mistral Bicolore’ is sublime! Once again, inspired by you, I love the large flowered Grevilleas and I keep looking at any Leucodendron I see in nearby landscapes as well as nurseries. It is interesting to see your xMangave ‘Silver Fox’ bloom. Does it attract hummingbirds? I believe that through IG, at least one person stated that their ‘Silver Fox’ was monocarpic but that theirs had produced pups for the future! Have a great week!

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    1. As our temperatures tend to warm up early, Kay, I'd be hesitant about planting Anemone coronaria this late. I planted Anemone 'The Bride' nearly 3 weeks after 'Lord Lieutenant' in late November (due to the supplier's failure to ship 'The Bride' on schedule) and it's lagging the other varieties significantly AND producing blooms on stems less than 2 inches tall. Re the large-flowered Grevilleas, while 'Superb' and 'Peaches & Cream' develop into very large shrubs, my 'Ned Kelly' have stayed smaller - you might be able to fit one into your space (although I note that, while producing flowers year-round, 'Ned Kelly' doesn't bloom as prolifically as the other two). I haven't seen any hummingbirds feeding from the Mangave blooms but then I have a lot of other flowers in the vicinity they love so it may be that they're just pulled to those.

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  6. Considering the "winter wonderland" all around me at the moment, this virtual flower show is stunning and very welcomed. Although the blue anemone is my favorite, the one in today's vase is magnificent with the snap dragon, and perfectly timed for Valentine's Day. In the garden, I'm particularly amazed by xMangave 'Silver Fox' bloom: the hight of that stock makes you stand up and take notice, doesn't it?

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    1. Mangave 'Silver Fox' is behaving very much like its agave parent. The bloom stalk is just under 5 feet tall, which is smaller than the blooms stalks produced by most agaves, but yes it stands out on the edge of the bed in that location. I didn't place it with a bloom stalk in mind and I'm frankly surprised that it's blooming so early in its life.

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  7. An absolutely amazing display but then I would expect nothing less.
    I had been wondering about cutting back my baby Leucadendron. It came as basically one stem topped with a 'bud', which has now 'bloomed'. I notice there is now a side shoot about half way down the stem and was thinking of a snip above that. Is that the right thing to do?

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    1. I didn't start pruning my Leucadendrons in earnest until my plants were fairly mature, Jessica, although I've always cut the "bloomed out" flowers off by cutting the stem at least several inches below the cone. I currently cut my mature plants down by one third to one-half but you may want to err in a conservative direction while your plant is still young. There are some good videos online about pruning Leucadendrons you may want to check - the bottom line is never cut the stems down to the ground.

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    2. I think I will just snip off the cone for now and see what happens. Thanks Kris.

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  8. Beautiful! Just what I needed to see when everything here is covered in ice - freezing rain followed by sleet!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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    1. Your weather sounds horrid, Lea. I hope you get a warm-up soon!

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  9. Oh, it must be heavenly to walk through your garden right now. Those anemones are spectacular Kris. Your bicolored ones paired with the rich red snapdragons are really perfect.

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    1. I was pleased with that match-up too, Susie. I only had two blooms on the snapdragons so I was very lucky there.

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  10. Your post is like a lovely dream. When I look out all I see is white. Snow snow snow. That is ok. It is keeping my plants toes warm and your pictures keep the gardening fire warm in my heart.

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    1. I've no personal experience gardening in snowy conditions, Lisa, but I've always heard that snow is a good insulator and that it's ice you have to worry about. Nonetheless, I hope you get warmer temperatures and a nice, slow melt soon!

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  11. Two favorites in one post - thanks for cheering me up on this chilly, gray day while the sky gifts us with alternating snow, sleet and freezing rain (groan).

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    1. Yikes! I guess that means no peaceful snow-shoe walks at the moment, Eliza :(

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  12. A wonderful picture of the Isopogon!

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    1. There are only two flowers on the Isopogon at the moment, Diana, but that's one more than there was the last time the plant bloomed! I hope it'll bloom more prolifically as it matures.

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  13. You sure don't have a shortage of flowers this month. It's nothing but Hellebores around here, our 24 degree night a couple weeks ago finished off the blooms that had been sailing through winter. You inspired me to plant Anemones again -I haven't grown them probably in 20 years. I bought 20 A.'Black Eye' from Longfield and am hoping for some long stems.

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    1. I'm very happy with Anemone 'Lord Lieutanant', Kathy, but 'The Bride' is blooming on stems less than 2 inches tall, which is annoying. We had some very warm weather stretches in January so I'm wondering if it's just confused.

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  14. I bet that Freesia bouquet smells heavenly! The contrast between your sunny abundance and my own paltry contribution made me laugh. Your garden is stunning as always, Kris. My favorite today is that fabulous Calliandra - and of course all the Leucadendrons. So very cool...

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    1. There were just two Freesias in bloom on Saturday when I took the last of my Bloom Day photos, Anna, but the very next day the yellow variety was blooming all over the place so I couldn't help cutting some for IAVOM. And, yes, the flowers do add a wonderful scent in the front entry of the house!

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  15. Wow Kris! Carnival time in your fabulous garden and IAVOM vases! All so colourful and just brimming with loveliness! Where to start. Lots of favourites in there, including that little darling Itsy Bitsy - I spied her there. Your garden is such a startling contrast to ours in the UK, especially mine, which is frostbitten and looks almost completely dead! Thank goodness for snowdrops and arum leaves!! Thank you for such a wonderful celebration of flowers!! Just what I needed! Amanda

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    1. 'Itsy Bitsy' is a star all year long, Amelia, but sometimes she has to step into the background to give others a chance to take the stage ;)

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  16. Oh ! Those Anemone varieties took my breath away. I wish I could grow Leucodendrones in my region some day,It would be my pleasure if you join my link up party related to Gardening here at http://jaipurgardening.blogspot.com/2021/02/garden-affair-edible-flowers.html

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    1. You may get a little too much rain for Leucadendrons, Arun, although maybe you could cover them up during your monsoon season.

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  17. I love anemones and what a treat we have today with some in the vase, another vase and a tour round your garden. Thank you.

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    1. I'm happy that I finally found a way to grow anemones successfully, even if it means treating them as annuals, Noelle.

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  18. So much color! Thanks for the treat. My eyes are tired of seeing so much white in our landscape here.

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    1. That arctic blast you're experiencing is persistent, Loree. I hope it beats a retreat soon!

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  19. Wow, you make planting anemone corms seem mandatory. So pretty.

    Isopogon, cool!

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    1. I hope the Isopogon becomes more generous with its flowers someday, HB, but I'm trying to be patient.

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  20. Oh my goodness, I am green with envy. So many fabulous blooms and my poor flowers are still struggling to straighten themselves up after spending a week covered in snow. You make me long for spring. Beautiful arrangements too.

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    1. We may not get much rain but we have sun, Chloris! It also looks like we're heading into a stretch of unseasonably warm weather...

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  21. Hi Kris, What a glorious, colorful garden you have! Too many fabulous plants to comment on, except I have to say one of my favorites is Leucadendron 'Safari Sunset. Looking at your flowers, one would suspect you live in a perfect climate with no challenges! But I know the truth, and, I suspect the "perfect climate" does not exist. (But some are more perfect than others!) Kudos to your hard work and creativity!

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    1. You're right, Deb. Much as I appreciate our climate on many scores, including the warmth it's currently providing relative to the freezing conditions faced by so many people right now, drought has become a perpetual problem. Unless we get some kind of "March miracle," this season is on track to be the driest since I started monitoring rain levels.

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  22. I am constantly amazed at the variety of plant material in your garden, crossing hardiness zones that would not work here - I think we are both 10 A..Wonderful variety and a Bradford Pear< crazy. I believe those are Liberty Red Snaps.Love the Anemones and Snaps, puzzled at first at what they could be?

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    1. My winter hardiness zone is now classified as 11a (!), Amelia. I give less weight to those ratings than the ones provided by Sunset for western gardeners, though. Sunset's zonal map takes into account summer heat, humidity, rain patterns as well as winter low temperatures. My Sunset zone is 23/24.

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  23. oh, interesting..the heat zones here I am not so sure about.

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