Monday, July 27, 2020

In a Vase on Monday: There's always something

While I wait impatiently for my traditional summer blooms (dahlias, sunflowers, zinnias) to make an appearance, I shifted my focus to the flowers that make up the backbone of my garden.  Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' is having a really good year and it provided the inspiration for my first vase this week.

Last week, I speculated that I might end up using succulents in this week's vase.  As it turned out, that wasn't necessary but I did add succulent flowers in the form of Cotyledon orbiculata, commonly known as pig's ear (based on the foliage, not the flowers).

Back view: I'm in the process of cutting back Leucadendron 'Safari Goldstrike' so I used stems of that as my foliage element

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream', Abelia grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope', Cotyledon orbiculata, Leucanthemum x superbum, Lantana 'Lucky Yellow', and Leucadendron 'Safari Goldstrike'


Speaking of plants having a good year, the Amaryllis belladonna I introduced last week is having its best year ever.  Last year I think I had three bloom stalks but this year the flowers are dominating my back border.  This time I paired them with some of the last stems of Agapanthus.

Pink and blue isn't a common combination for me but the Cuphea 'Starfire Pink' I used as filler material led me in that direction

Back view, featuring Cuphea 'Starfire Pink' and Pandorea jasminoides

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Amaryllis belladonna, Alstroemeria 'Inca Vienna', noID Agapanthus, Cuphea 'Starfire Pink', and Pandorea jasminoides


Can you believe that July is almost over?  How is it that time still seems to pass so quickly even when each day feels much like the day before?  The future is still murky but I'm trying to focus on what I can control in my small corner of the world, like renovating a couple of garden beds to prepare for replanting this fall.  I'm hopeful that, in addition to changes to the garden, the new year will bring new leadership to guide the US out of the mess it's in and, if we're all lucky, a viable vaccine.

In the meantime, for more IAVOM arrangements created from floral and foliage material on hand, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2020 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

30 comments:

  1. Both are lovely per usual, Kris. :) I'm a big fan of 'Peaches & Cream' and I love how the lantana and Shasta daisies pick up its bit of yellow. The belladonna lilies are gorgeous, the bit of pink in the alstroemeria complements it well. Pink and blue makes me think of newborn baby arrangements!
    I think this is a first– that my zinnias and sunflowers have started before yours. Probably won't happen again either. ;) Have a great week!

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    1. Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' isn't quite as floriferous as 'Superb' but it's a close second. The delayed arrival of the sunflowers, zinnias and dahlias is entirely my fault, as I got a very late start with the warm season bloomers this year.

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  2. I love those shaggy white daisies with the very impressive name! I marvel at the way you know all the names and Latin names too of all your amazing flowers. How do you remember them all? And I love the amaryllis - they are really gorgeous! Are they related to nerines which flower here in autumn? Same pretty pink and similar flower. Two lovely vases again Kris!! Thank you. Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/07/an-orange-vase-on-monday.html

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    1. I think the fact that I use plants' "proper names" so regularly, particularly in my blog and Instagram posts, has hardwired them in my memory. Nerines, like Hippeastrums, are in the Amaryllidaceae family so they and the the two true Amaryllis species are cousins.

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  3. The muted almost hedgerow tones of the first vase seem almost unusu for you, Kris, and as always it's intriguing to read through the list and work out what everything is. Your second and contrasting vase is VERY diffeent and the shade of pink of the maryllis is lovely - how exciting to have so many of them this year! Thank you for sharing every week too

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    1. I usually add stronger colors to the mix when I use Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' - I almost did so this week - but I deliberately tried to keep the colors of the first arrangement soft this week. It's getting harder to change up the mix I use in my arrangements, which is why I'm chomping at the bit to see my dahlias, sunflowers and zinnias arrive.

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  4. As always your arrangements are lovely. Wish I could grow Grevillia here, even in a pot. Opened my garden today for two Master Gardener tours. Was a very busy weekend but it sure was a good motivator to get things done and tidy up.

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    1. That's exciting, Elaine! I hope both you and the attendees had a great time.

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  5. It's funny to read that you are waiting for dahlias, zinnias and sunflowers to make an appearance Kris when they are already out in this part of the world. Two elegant and attractive vases as always. I do hope that you get your heart's desire when it comes to the presidential election later this year and of course we all wish for a vaccine.

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    1. For various reasons, I planted my dahlia tubers a good 6-8 weeks later than I did last year, Anna, and I sowed the sunflower and zinnia seeds even later. Yet, I still went ahead and pinched back all those plants to encourage branching once they reached a proper size, delaying blooms still further. That was probably foolish given my late start.

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  6. Those are fabulous flower combinations ! So pretty .. I don't plant a lot of "flowery" plants .. so I miss having vases of gorgeous flowers like this .. you nudge me into rethinking that now ! LOL

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    1. I've always been a bit of a "flower freak" but I've been working hard to balance flowers with foliage since we moved into this garden (and started renovating it) almost 10 years ago. I give double points for flashy foliage plants that produce at least a smattering of flowers.

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  7. Well done! You have so much energy to get those arrangements done. If I manage to get a single Dahlia flower into a vase it's a miracle.

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    1. IAVOM adds a rhythm to my blogging exercise, HB. I made up arrangements just for myself going back decades - it's only the schedule of that activity that's gotten cast in concrete in recent years.

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  8. Here, here on new leadership and a vaccine! Alstroemeria is on my wish list. One Canadian source out east states that it can survive down to CND zone 6 which is more or less zone 5 in the U.S., but US sources indicate zone 7. I suppose I'll just have to try it to find out!

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    1. In your climate, Margaret, I expect Alstroemeria will go dormant during the winter months whereas ours generally go underground as summer progresses, especially as the garden gets increasingly drier. The plants would probably love spending winter in a greenhouse if you've got one.

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  9. So surprised your zinnia aren't blooming yet. Mine have been going for over a month, but then I planted the seeds in February, which was way too early.
    As always, your vases are lovely and full of cheerful color.

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    1. Most of my zinnia seeds didn't go in until June this year, Cindy - much later than they should have! Although they handle heat well, zinnias need more water than my garden beds receive so I sow my seeds in the raised planters in my cutting garden but, because the cool-season flowers (anemones, larkspurs, Orlaya, etc) got a late start due to cooler-than-usual spring temperatures and then hung on longer, I didn't pull those as early as I should have to give the zinnias (or other summer bloomers) a timely start. If that happens again, I guess I'll sow seeds into pots to start and then transplant the seedlings. As a rule, I prefer to direct sow what I can here.

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  10. There's never a shortage of flowers in your garden, Kris, always a pleasure to see your delightful vases. :)

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  11. Leucadendron is an incredibly useful vase companion, it's such a great shrub. I seem to like the back view of the second vase even than the front thanks to the Cuphea; it like the glue that holds them all together. The pink Amaryllis is astonishing.

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    1. I can't imagine my garden without my Leucadendrons. Off-hand, I couldn't even tell you how many I have. That Cuphea is a wonderful plant too. In addition to providing great vase material, the bees and hummingbirds love it.

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  12. The pink and blue are both strong colours, but they balance each other perfectly.
    How can it be, almost August, already?!

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    1. Apparently time doesn't stop, even when it feels as if we've been frozen in place!

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  13. Always a cheerful sight when you present your vases full of flowers. My naked ladies are just beginning to bloom. I always like to bring in a few for the lovely fragrance they give.

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    1. I was surprised at how well the naked ladies held up in a vase, Lisa. I guess I've never cut them for a flower arrangement before.

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  14. These are both wonderful. You do have some wonderful plants to share each week. I love the overhead view showing your first arrangement with the Leucadendron and Grevillea. Colors work so nicely together. And swoon--the second vase is perfect.

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    1. Thanks Susie. The blue, pink and white arrangement is unusual for me but I was surprised at how much I liked it.

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  15. Peaches and Cream is such a lovely name for a plant! And it is a plant I love seeing in your vases Kris. Those colours, with a hint of yellow, are so summery and pretty. And the second vase is very romantic. �� Wishing you some peace of mind this week Kris. :-)

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    1. Thanks Cathy. Peace of mind is something we can all use more of at the moment.

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