Monday, March 2, 2020

In a Vase on Monday: More bulb blooms!

The second of the two species tulips I planted in early December began blooming late last week so it kicked off my search for materials to include in this week's arrangements.  Unfortunately, Tulipa clusiana 'Cynthia' is even more diminutive than her sister 'Lady Jane' and she got lost among the other elements I included in my first vase, especially as light levels dropped and the tulip flowers closed in response.

The flowers of Coleonema 'Sunset Gold'  obscure the 3 pale yellow and reddish-pink tulip blooms on the lower right side of the vase.  I probably should have snipped away some of those tiny Coleonema flowers.

The Narcissus currently popping up throughout my garden share space with pink and yellow Freesias at the back of the vase

Alstromeria dominates the overhead view

Clockwise from the upper left: a better view of Tulipa clusiana 'Cynthia', noID Alstroemeria, noID pink and yellow Freesias, Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold' (aka breath of heaven), and noID Narcissus


The Anemones in my cutting garden shifted into high gear as our temperatures climbed into the mid-80sF (29C) during the course of last week.  As the flowers opened in larger numbers, green aphids moved in en masse.  I cut the open blooms and carefully washed the horrid sap-suckers off each of them before bringing them inside.

Anemone 'Mistral Azzurro'  produces especially tall stems

I drew on the violet and blue notes in the beautiful petals of the Anemones when choosing fillers for the back of the vase

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Anemone 'Mistral Azzurro', Echium handiense 'Pride of Fuerteventura', Hebe 'Purple Shamrock', noID white Freesia, Limonium perezii (aka sea lavender), and Polygala fruticosa (aka sweet pea bush)


The mauve Anemones were affected by the weather just as the blue ones were so I decided they should be cut as well, creating a reason for a third vase (as if I needed a reason).

I made use of the variegated Hebe in this arrangement as well

Like the Anemones, my Pericallis are also under siege by aphids so I cut and cleaned one of those flower stems to dress up the back of this vase

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Anemone 'Mistral Rarity', Lotus jacobaeus, Osteospermum 'Berry White', Hebe 'Purple Shamrock', and hybrid Pericallis (aka florist's cineraria)


After a week of unseasonably warm temperatures, the weather shifted dramatically on Sunday as a storm front moved into Southern California.  After a few hours of morning sunshine, the sky turned gray and stayed that way while we hoped for rain.  I went to bed near 11pm, still hoping.  While table surfaces and the like were wet this morning, our roof-top weather station recorded no measurable rain.  This is the third storm to pass us by but forecasters are holding out yet another chance of rain starting next weekend.

For more In a Vase on Monday posts, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2020 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

24 comments:

  1. Gosh, you do have a lot of bulbs, Kris, and your vases are reaping the benefits. I especially like the middle one, from both front and back

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    1. Unfortunately, the anemones aren't going to last long as all were planted at the same time. Next year I may plant more but on a staggered schedule to prolong their flower power!

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  2. Hello Kris,
    It's great that I don't have to make a choice because I love all the bouquets.
    You are waiting for rain and in Holland people have enough of the grey and rainy days. Last month more than 100 mm came down.
    Have a wonderful day
    Flowergreatings Marijke

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    1. We had such wonderful rain last year, Marijke - 160% of our "normal" level. I didn't expect that again this year but it would have been nice to at least reach our seasonal average. "Drought" is once again on everyone's lips here.

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  3. March should be the beginning of our rain. I hope with you.

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    1. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you as well then, Diana! Rain is possible again this coming weekend and the prospects look stronger than they were with the last storm but ridges of high pressure air keep redirecting the rain away from us so I'm not feeling confident.

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  4. Lovely vases, as always, Kris! How you keep coming up with such varied combinations is nothing short of amazing. And those anemones are simply beautiful.
    Fingers crossed for rain!

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    1. We've had 2 March Miracles so another is always possible!

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  5. My fellow bloggers have said it already - your anemones are glorious! Gorgeous soft colours which are so feminine and pretty. Lovely vases, all of them - as always! Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/03/in-foraged-vase-on-monday.html

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    1. Thanks Amanda! I'm pretty pleased with the anemones too.

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  6. Such tropical abundance, Kris, simply beautiful! Just checked out the coleonema which is too pretty, but it likes fresh soil which I only have in winter. Guess it'd need to be watered all summer, what do you think? Have a good week :)

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    1. I'd say the Coleonema needs a moderate amount of water to thrive, Annette. As our rainy season is generally limited to October through March, summer irrigation is necessary here. Succulents are nearly the only plants that can get by on winter rain alone.

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  7. I do hope that you get the predicted rain. I want to see your vases full of flowers like this. They are so cheerful. Happy IAVOM.

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    1. The chance of rain this weekend currently sits below 25% but the numbers for the middle of next week are now more promising. Fingers crossed!

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  8. Wowed by your anemones, which look perfect despite the aphid attack. I have so few aphids haven't bothered mine so far. Tulipa clusiana 'Cynthia' is well worth a closer look. Very pretty arrangements, all three. Have a great week Kris! I'll keep fingers crossed you get some rain. No amount of watering seems as effective as the real thing.

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    1. A rapid jump in temperature almost always seems to trigger aphid infestations here, Susie. We're warm and dry once today but the temperatures should slowly decline as the week proceeds and - hopefully - rain approaches.

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  9. I am surprised how much I love the first vase, since I am not a big fan of pink.

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  10. No matter how many times I see your arrangements, it is still hard for me to grasp that all of it grows in your garden, just at your fingertips. Every arrangement is lovely and it's hard to pick a favorite.

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    1. Southern California offers a great growing environment, Cindy - at least if you ignore the water issue.

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  11. Oh how inconsiderate of those tulips to close their petals and sulk! Those anemones are beautiful Kris especially the tall blues. I hope those weather gods push the rain clouds in your direction soon.

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    1. The weather gods are anything but beneficent, Anna.

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  12. Per Annette's comment about coleonema, here in central California we grow it on once a month summer H20 (after establishment, natch). And oh, that third vase! Love love love the colors and the lotus perfect touch.

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    1. My soil is heavy on sand, which affects my watering schedule but I'm still working on improving it to increase water retention. A deep watering once a month during summer is a great goal.

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