Monday, March 25, 2019

In a Vase on Monday: Pulling Out the Stops

You may not believe it but I do hesitate about cutting some flowers in my garden to fill a vase.  This week, I decided to go all in with some of my selections.  The first of my Dutch Iris started blooming just over a week ago and I took the plunge and cut two of those tall stems yesterday for my first vase.

My Freesias are fading fast and, as the yellow variety provides a perfect complement to the Iris, I wanted to take advantage of this window when both are in bloom

The small yellow flowers at the back of the arrangement are Ranunculus californicus, our state's native buttercup

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Iris x hollandica, Freesia, Lavandula stoechas, L. multifida, and Ranunculus californicus


My second arrangement involved the sacrifice of an even more precious bloom, the first fully open flower of Leucospermum 'Brandi'.  Last year, the first time it bloomed since I planted it in March 2016, I got only four or five flowers in total.  This year it's produced one and a half dozen large buds so far with signs of secondary buds still forming.

I admit I still shuddered a little when I cut the Leucospermum bloom.  It's so heavy I was forced to add chicken wire to the inside of the teapot to hold its stem upright.

Lotus berthelottii 'Amazon Sunset' and Ranunculus put on their own show in the back view. Like the Dutch Iris, the Ranunculus in the cutting garden have popped into bloom in the last week.

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Lotus berthelotti 'Amazon Sunset' and 'Gold Flash', Helichrysum petiolare 'Licorice Splash', Narcissus 'Geranium', Ranunculus, Narcissus 'Katie Heath' and, in the middle, Leucospermum 'Brandi'


For more Monday vases, visit our host, Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

My vases in their places


All material © 2012-2019 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

24 comments:

  1. I certainly find it hard to imagine you being reluctant to cut blooms, Kris!! The first vase is reaklly striking and belies the fact that only 2 iris stems were used as they make a great impact. Your second vase blends the contents so subtly that the mosaic of the contents comes as a surprise. Both lovely, Kris

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    1. Thanks Cathy! Because I do have qualms about harvesting some flowers for my vases, it's a good thing I've got a healthy supply.

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  2. All those lovely gems Kris! The iris was my sister's favourite flower and although I have only grown them in alpine size, a few in my last garden, I haven't planted any of the larger variety. Having said that, we have inherited a beautiful pale lavender coloured bearded iris in the long narrow flowerbed which runs down the outside of our cottage. Can't beat your gorgeous coral-coloured ranunculus though - that is a real treat! Thank you. My offering this week is very much more modest!! Have a good week. Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2019/03/a-trio-of-vases-on-monday.html

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    1. I've had a terrible time getting my bearded Iris to bloom in recent years, Amanda, possibly because they didn't get enough water during their peak growth periods. With this winter's heavier-than-usual rain, I'm hopeful of a better turn-out. Somewhat surprisingly, the Dutch Iris seem to be more reliable, whatever the weather.

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  3. The arrangements are lovely and the colour combos quite striking. I am jealous of your floral abundance. Am still looking in the garden for any signs of green. For now will enjoy your abundance.

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    1. I hope Spring turns up at your door soon, l2g!

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  4. Gorgeous peachy tones looking good with the silvers. I know what you mean about cutting. I will cut most things but some I just can't. Lavandula multifida is a new one to me. It looks interesting.

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    1. Lavandula multifida is sometimes sold here as "California Lavender', Alison, presumably because it does so well in our Mediterranean climate.

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  5. Wow, I love the Iris and Brandi,I would have been hesitant to cut both and the Freesia. The variety in your garden continues to amaze me. I couldn't hope for Narcissus here.

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    1. After a few years in the ground, there are so many Freesia that I feel no hesitancy whatsoever about cutting those, Amelia. The Leucospermum isn't that prolific yet but I'm hopeful. You should see the huge specimen in my neighbor's garden up the street from me. I'm unsure of the species/cultivar but the plant has to be at least 8 feet tall and 10 feet wide and it's covered in orange-red flowers.

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    1. I was surprised that Dutch Iris would grow here, Diana. But, like the calla lilies, it seems the plants are comfortable with a long dry period during dormancy and will bloom as long as they get winter rain (or irrigation).

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  7. Those irises are such a gorgeous colour and I love blue and yellow together, it is so pretty. I don't know how you could bear to pick your leucospermum flower but it was worth it, the flower needs to be studied close up it is such an interesting shape. The colours of the flowers look fabulous together, you often have these wonderful coral shades in your arrangements and I love them.

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    1. I had a long debate with myself about cutting the Leucospermum bloom, Chloris. I decided to go for it when additional buds began to develop into flowers seemingly all at once. It's a nice flower to have breakfast with.

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  8. Two splendid bouquets! Your Dutch iris are magnificent and just perfect with the freesias. I would have balked at cutting both the Leucospermum and the iris, but it must be wonderful to get to admire them easily through the week. And the ranunculus too... <3 I struggled getting enough water to mine, but perhaps it had as much to do with temperatures rising too quickly. Would love to know how their garden performance is for you.

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    1. Ranunculus can handle heat but they are thirsty plants, Amy. That's why mine are all in the raised planters in my cutting garden. It's the only area I allow myself to water lavishly.

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  9. Seeing that stunning first arrangement, I was all ready to say that whatever else followed was nice but nothing could beat that winning combination. Then I scrolled down. Gee, when you pull out all the stops, you really pull out all the stops!

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    1. You can't beat a Leucospermum, Peter! That one flower is the size of my hand.

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  10. I think you did the Leucospermum 'Brandi bloom proud!

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  11. Your iris is a beauty. :) I am very fond of blue irises - there is just something about that blue with the trace of yellow that makes me happy! The Leucospermum flower is quite impressive - glad it seems to be gaining strength in your garden as it does look good in a vase. Both are wonderful vases again Kris!

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    1. Thanks Cathy! Blue and yellow is a sharper contrast than I usually go for but one of my favorite combinations nonetheless.

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  12. Wow, so pretty! I love both color schemes, blue and gold are perfectly contrasted and the orange/peach is beautiful as well. The ranunculus is the best!

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    1. Now that I've seen all the "salmon" variations among the Ranunculus, Eliza, I'm feeling a little disappointed that I planted so many of the white variety. But then, white has been in short supply in my garden so I'm sure those blooms will serve their purpose too.

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