Monday, October 29, 2018

In a Vase on Monday: Time to move on

We had another difficult week in the US.  Fourteen bombs delivered to prominent critics of the President.  Eleven more people gunned down in a house of worship.  The frequency of such unimaginable, intolerable, and heart-wrenching events has become overwhelming.  Those who call for unity after each new tragedy only to immediately turn around and attack those who disagree with them with vitriol and hyperbolic claims are beyond comprehension.  The only thing that keeps me from moving into a cave somewhere is the hope that next week good, sensible people will vote to move the country back in the direction of civility, reasoning based on facts, and a shared sense of humanity.

My garden is less colorful at the moment since I pulled the spent summer bloomers from my cutting garden last week.  I've sown seeds and planted bulbs and plugs with the expectation of having my first cool season blooms there within the next couple of months.  In the meantime, I have to scout other areas of my garden to find vase-worthy materials.

Yellow-flowered Senna bicapsularis has a brief bloom period but it's at its peak right now

Finding suitable companions for the Senna's flowers wasn't easy, however; hence my use of unripe guavas as a less than satisfactory feature at the back of the arrangement.  The guavas here are consumed only by the resident squirrels and I don't expect they'll miss these.

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Senna bicapcularis, noID guava fruit, dried flower stems of Leonotis leonurus, foliage of Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', and feathery plumes of Pennisetum advena 'Rubrum'


The bush violets (Barleria obtusa) are also plentiful at the moment, providing the focal point for my second vase.

Violet buds open at regular intervals but the spent flowers also drop continuously so using the flowers in a vase is a mixed bag

I clipped Moroccan daisies (Pyrethropsis hosmariense) to dress up the back of the vase/mug

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Barleria obtusa, Correa 'Ivory Bells', Erysimum linifolium 'Variegatum', Osteospermum '4D Silver', and Pyrethropsis hosmariense


For more vases, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.



All material © 2012-2018 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

38 comments:

  1. Oh Kris my heart has been aching again and I tend to go back to nature and create to try and give myself hope. Your scouting in the garden has paid off. How absolutely beautiful your vases giving me such joy to see them. I can't wait to see your cool weather blooms. Mine will likely be some paperwhites, Christmas cactus and amaryllis. I think I could like gardening year round on a small plot.

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    1. My first cool season blooms are likely to be foxgloves and snapdragons, Donna, mainly because I planted them as plugs. The seeds and bulbs will take longer, although I've been surprised to see that the foliage of freesias planted in prior years is already showing up in parts of my garden.

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  2. I think the backside of the Senna bicapsularis vase is my favorite! The Guava are wonderful and thanks for the reminder that if I can wait to cut the Leonotis leonurus they'll be a fabulous brown (I almost cut them this week, at the green stage).

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    1. It's funny but, when I cut that stem of guava fruits, I thought "well, Loree may appreciate these even if no one else does." I'd envisioned more contrast between the unripe green fruit and the copper color of the Leptosptermum foliage, though.

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  3. Two different vases filled with plants and material new to me...all very pretty.

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    1. The Senna and Barleria are relatively uncommon even here, Noelle!

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  4. Kris, your heartfelt first paragraph is echoed on this side of the Atlantic, and no doubt in all corners of the planet where integrity, love and decency exist. May common sense prevail next week - your country needs it to, and so does the rest of the world. In the meantime, we take refuge in our flowers. they never fail to bring joy and lift the spirits. Your two arrangements are lovely - thank you. I absolutely love the Rubrum grass. I see it a lot when I visit my son in Melbourne, Australia and can never resist giving it a stroke! It's almost like a small furry creature! I hope you enjoy my wild bunch this week! And there will be a second vase on Halloween - can't resist! https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2018/10/a-tiny-vase-on-monday.html
    Amanda

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    1. You're right, Amanda - the grass plumes are very pet-able.

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  5. What a contrasting pair of vases. Kris, and I am intrigued to hear what you might be growing in your cool season beds - always good to have anew project to enjoy, especially if it includes new blooms!

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    1. We only have 2 real seasons, Cathy - a cool season than encompasses late fall, winter and early spring, and a warm-hot season that covers the rest of the year. My cool season blooms should include foxgloves, snapdragons, sweet peas (if I can protect the seedlings this year), ranunculus, larkspur and the like. Some of those may be late spring or early summer blooms in your part of the world.

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  6. Kris, days get heaver and heavier. I share your hope that people will vote wisely.

    The yellow Senna has a real presence. Love the color. Interesting to see bush violets. It is frustrating to have to pick up dropped petals constantly, but they certainly are attractive now.

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    1. So much hope rests on the results of this election, Susie - too much perhaps.

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  7. I'm with you, Kris, in hoping that decency, respect, and civil discourse can return to our hurting country and world.

    Your arrangements are wonderful and the guava fruit is a fun touch!

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    1. I thought the guavas could use some exposure, Peter - the silly squirrels usually bury the unripe fruits as if they're nuts.

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  8. The collective consciousness keeps getting progressively heavier. We need some light and soon. Fingers crossed for a good voter turnout. Your arrangements help lighten the mood, so thank you. Love the yellow Senna and even though Barleria may be messy in the house, I love its look, along with the Osteospermum.

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    1. If nothing else I'm expecting a good turn-out on election day, Eliza, despite the periodic "man-on-the-street" interviews I hear with individuals expressing one or another excuse for not voting.

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  9. Nicely done! I just planted a Senna for the Sulphur Butterflies, do you get butterflies? The grass was a great accent choice.I see the Barleria as well and love the second vase - think I need that,too. Happy Halloween.

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    1. The Senna has brought in a LOT of cloudless sulphur butterflies here, Amelia. In fact, they seem to show up in droves a month or so before the shrubs flower. I'm careful to check the stems when I cut them to ensure I'm not carrying away any caterpillars.

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  10. I am feeling the same things. We can only hope that the vote will be in the right direction... yet it is disheartening to even glance at the news.

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    1. I've reduced my own news consumption in the interest of maintaining my sanity, Libby, but, with so many news outlets now, it's hard to escape it for long (unless one resorts to moving into a cave of course).

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  11. Belos arranjos de flores.
    Boa entrada de mês de novembro.

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  12. Is that Buttercream, which I saw on a Mediterranean Gardening post?

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    1. Yes, I think the cultivar name is 'Buttercream'. It's a wonderful plant, although I did a poor job in siting mine. I've already got a spot in mind for another one if I can find the plant.

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  13. I am so sorry for what you are going through Kris, and hope that next week there will be some relief. The news is disheartening all over the world, including here and I also feel despair about the direction in which we seem to heading.
    I think the guavas were a stroke of genius- they look perfect in the vase.

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    1. I hope the tide turns soon for all of us, Jane. I'm not sure the guavas reflect inspiration or desperation but I'm glad you liked them.

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  14. There are times when I am even more grateful that I am a gardener and I can go hang out with my plants and feel better for awhile. I love the flowers on the Senna ! Will they hold up in the vase for long ?

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    1. If cut early enough (i.e. when the flowers are still round buds), the Senna flowers have a decent vase life, Kathy, but most of those I picked this week were well beyond that point already so I may not get a full week out of them this time.

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  15. Well said.

    Our gardens provides such comfort.

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    1. They do. I'm looking for a bubble I can inflate over mine.

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  16. I love the senna and the guava fruit, it such a pretty arrangement. Barleria is new to me, it is delightful.

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    1. Blue flowers are always welcome here but they're especially appreciated in early fall when there's nothing much else going on.

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  17. I have planted a senna in my garden. I can't wait to see the blooms next year. I love that yellow. And your violets. Every time I see "bush" written behind the word violet I pause. It is such an unusual way of looking at violets to me.

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    1. I hope the Senna does well for you, Lisa. The Barleria really does form a huge bush. Violets grow bigger in South Africa I guess!

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  18. Hi Kris, yes, times are tough but I think they've always been and will always be as men just aren't a peaceful species, are they. But our gardens are like 'caves' for us –I often refer to ours as a 'bubble' where we feel safe and happy– and they give so much. Pity those who don't have one! Your vases are pretty. The senna is a fab plant, wish I could grow it. Our friends have just gone back to California after having spent the summer here in their castle. They too appreciate to get away from it all. Happy autumn days!

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    1. You're right, Annette, the garden provides an excellent refuge. Best wishes.

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  19. The senna flowers are very pretty Kris, and that aerial photo shows them off so well - love the Pennisetum in there too! :)

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    1. Pennisetum plumes give life to every arrangement I use them in, Cathy.

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