Monday, June 19, 2017

In a Vase on Monday: Lisianthus, at last

I don't know if you've wondered what in heck happened to the blooms of my Eustoma grandiflorum (commonly known as Lisianthus), but I have.  However, looking back into my photographic record from last year, I found that I featured these flowers in vases for the first time in mid-June almost exactly one year ago.  So, it appears they're not actually late at all (even if they did bloom earlier in 2015).  I've just been impatient.  And I'm still impatient, as there was only one bud in full bloom on Sunday.  Under most circumstances, I'd have waited until there were more flowers before cutting any but we're in the middle of an extended heatwave and I'm going to be out of town from mid-week through the weekend so I thought I might as well enjoy the bloom while I can.  My husband is assigned to water the garden should the heat start to shrivel everything in my absence but, if the heat is severe, that may be of little help.

Despite my focus on the Eustoma, my first vase is an ensemble cast.

The white Eustoma flower is surrounded by both new blooms, like the ornamental oregano, and others on the wane, like the Arthropodium

Back view, highlighting foxglove stems that have hung on longer than I expected, especially given the rise in temperature

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains: Eustoma grandiflorum, Arthropodium cirratum, Ocimum 'African Blue Basil', Digitalis purpurea, Erigeron glaucus 'Wayne Roderick', Origanum 'Monterey Bay', and Tanacetum nivium


As I wandered through my garden in search of flowers, I passed the artichoke plant on the back slope.  I'd no idea what to do with the 2 long-stemmed chokes left on the plant but they were already too old to make good eating so I went ahead and cut them for a second vase.  I cut some Centranthus ruber as well while I was down there but didn't like the combination of the 2 elements so took a different tack when I assembled the arrangement.

Front view

Back view

Top view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains: 2 artichokes, Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', Artemisia ludoviciana, and Coprosma repens 'Plum Hussey'


The unused Centranthus flowers went into a tiny vase with one of the Zinnias just now coming into bloom.

The tiny vase sits at the kitchen sink but was impossible to photograph there due to window glare


The larger vases took their usual places in the front entry and on the dining table.



Although, there were signs that the first vase might need to be moved to a safer location when it garnered unwanted attention.

Maybe Pipig is jealous of Lisianthus?


But Pipig was soon diverted.  A foolhardy lizard ventured into her screened porch.  She brought it through the cat door into the house, prompting an on-and-off again effort on the part of all members of the household to recapture it after she dropped it - twice.  My husband and I moved various pieces of furniture and tried to motivate the lizard to leave the sanctuary it eventually found behind the bookcase bolted to the living room wall.  Meanwhile, Pipig lost interest and gave up the chase.

She looks annoyed, doesn't she?  Whether that's because she blames us for taking away her catch, or because we didn't appreciate her gift, is hard to say.


I kept up reconnaissance efforts while she took a nap.

Pipig displays her signature signal that she's done with exercise for the time being


The lizard eventually turned up in the kitchen.  After a few more failed attempts to trap it, including one that involved moving the refrigerator, it was safely captured and released back into the great outdoors (while the cat continued to sleep).

Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to see what she and other bloggers have going on for "In a Vase on Monday."



All material © 2012-2017 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

44 comments:

  1. Hooray for the return of Lisianthus! I think of you whenever I spot these in arrangements. Your use of the artichokes is delightful but the Pipig\lizard story made me laugh out loud. I can just picture you trying to capture her gift. Sometimes they're hard to return without a receipt.

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    1. Pipig apparently was peeved about our disruption of her "play" with the lizard. She brought in a second one. It was also captured and returned to the great outdoors following a chase. I'm hoping the lizards have gotten the word out to avoid entering her porch,

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  2. Hi Kris, I am totally smitten with your first bouquet! I think its the soft muted colors and the dainty blooms that speak to me and it is no secret that I love your Eustomas. So glad that they started to bloom for you, again.
    The artichokes really make a wonderful statement in your second arrangement.
    Oh my gosh, that cat story? Too funny! Sounds like your hairy companion provided you with a lot of exercise, it almost looks like she is enjoying watching you trying to catch the lizard as a punishment for not appreciating her gift.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. As I recall, we had a similar problem with lizards when summer arrived last year. Believe me, we don't want Pipig eating one of them - the result is not pretty!

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  3. I love your cat...very discriminating...lovely first vase with the foxglove but when I saw the artichokes I was in love....always a pleasure to see the variety of unusual materials for a vase....or for me unusual.

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    1. I have to say it's the first time I've used artichokes in a vase, Donna, but I did use grapes a couple of weeks ago.

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  4. Hurrah for the eustoma - I love to see them in your vases :) The soft muted colours with the single stem are perfect partners - and the artichokes are perfectly at home in the second vase. Thanks for sharing, Kris

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    1. Three more Eustoma bloomed this afternoon, Cathy, although none of the plants have produced a spray of flowers as yet.

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  5. Hi Kris, we have similar lizard chases here so I am laughing. My dog that really liked them finally got tired of it all and prefers to sit in the sun. He is almost 11.
    Some Floridians have been posting their Lisianthus and made me think of you - glad to see it back and lovely as ever. The Artichokes look amazing, I thought they were Proteas for a minute. I especially like them in the vase you chose. Happy Monday.

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    1. Pipig's 10 and I'd have thought her lizard hunting days were over too, Amy, especially as she's so bad hanging on to the creatures!

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  6. My cat Ronin is one reason I so seldom participate in this meme. He would be all over any flowers I brought into the house. He was actually chewing on the spiky plants I planted in the Mickey and Minnie containers that I put in my upstairs bathroom. My cats have never brought me still living presents like your lizard.

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    1. Thanks goodness Pipig has never brought in anything other than a lizard. I think she saw it as a toy rather than a gift. She only occasionally pays any attention to my vases and has never actually eaten anything in a vase but she does periodically nibble at house plants, not seemingly out of a taste for them so much as to redirect attention to herself when I'm ignoring her.

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  7. Os arranjos de flores estão lindos.
    Adorei o gato.
    Boa semana.
    janicce.

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  8. Thanks for rescuing the lizard.
    I wonder which plant Pipig was interested in.
    Aragon used to chew Scabiosa.

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    1. While she seemed fixated on the Eustoma, I suspect it was probably the smell of either the basil or the oregano in the arrangement that drew her to it.

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  9. Oh, goodie, lisianthus season begins! Your foxglove season overlaps mine, yours ending, mine beginning. The artichokes are an inspired choice and the lovely 'Copper Glow' leptospermum to go with them.
    Pipig is so sweet, even if she makes you rearrange the furniture. I'd forgive her anything. ;)

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    1. Oh, Pipig's been forgiven, at least by me if not perhaps by my husband, even though she brought in a second lizard. We're hoping this isn't the beginning of a trend...

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  10. The Lisianthus is gorgeous Kris. It's great to have those records so you can look back and see patterns of bloom time. The vase with artichokes turned out great. It's going to be nice meeting you in person Kris. Maybe we can get together for dinner one night, etc. I haven't really even had time to go over the schedule much yet. Maybe tomorrow.

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    1. It would be great if we can get together for dinner, Susie. I admit I haven't done more than scan the schedule either but I figure I'll have plenty of time to review it during my 5-hour flight.

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  11. Wow that artichoke arrangement is all kinds of wonderful! There's a rental house on our block with a huge pair of "chokes" doing their thing. It's empty and likely will be for another month. So tempting...

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    1. Well, you can enjoy the blooms, Loree. I've thought of growing them just for their architectural structure and blooms. That way, you never have to deal with the earwigs (shudder) that crawl out when you cut them.

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  12. You always have so much to show and some lovely photos. Your artichokes look architectural in the vase, I like the neutral tones of that one. We've got some just about ready, how do you cook yours? You had fun and games with the lizard, I hope that doesn't happen often. I love the sleeping pose - perfectly relaxed!

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    1. We steam the artichokes in a large pot and serve with lemon butter. We've already had a second lizard incident - I hope Pipig's got it out of her system now, or at least that the lizards have learned to stay away from her porch.

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  13. Ahhww Pipig, admiring your gorgeous arrangement! The artichoke vase looks extra cool though!!

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    1. I was pleased with the artichoke arrangement even though it was put together with no advance thought whatsoever.

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  14. I had been wondering about your Lisianthus; my seedlings didn't make it to the planting stage, I'll give in gracefully and just enjoy yours! The foxgloves surprise me, I would have expected that it was much too hot for them in your garden, maybe you have a shady spot that they enjoy. The Artichoke arrangement is very stylist and modern, works brilliantly.

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    1. I'm sorry your Lisianthus seedlings didn't hold up, Christina. I've read that the plants are difficult to grow from seeds and I had no luck with them either. Maybe that's why the plants are somewhat hard to find even here. I pulled all but 3 of the foxglove plants several weeks ago but those that remain do get shade in the afternoon. However, even so, I think the current heatwave may be the end of them.

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  15. Three gorgeous arrangements - and the second one really packs a lot of wow! I sympathize with your lizard rescue efforts! We even had to remove a whiptail from the house the other day; it proved easier to capture than I expected, given their speed and skittery nature. I can easily see how you might have to move a refrigerator to get yours out!

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    1. The big problem is when the lizards take refuge behind something bolted to the wall, which here in earthquake country is quite a lot! Then you just have to wait them out.

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  16. The flowers are beautiful and your cat is gorgeous! The orange-brown highlights in her tabby fur are amazing.

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    1. Pipig says thank you, Rachel. The cat rescue group I adopted her from called her a Torbie - a tortoiseshell tabby.

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  17. I'm glad you managed to rescue the lizards from Pipig - I wonder if actually the cat was annoyed not because you'd deprived her of her reptilian treat, but because she's having an identity crisis: cat or pig?! Fabulous markings on the foxglove, and I especially love the choke vase. I have a thing for tea tree flowers.

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    1. "Pipig" is Swedish for "squeaky," Sue. She was very squeaky when we adopted her - now she's just imperiously demanding. I love Leptospermum too. This one had just a couple of flowers last year but I'm getting whole sprays of them this year.

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  18. We are having a heatwave too Kris, although probably not as hot as yours. As you say, watering does not always help much when the temperatures get really high, and yet most things seem to survive long-term here. I love your Eustoma flowers, and this white one combined with the foxgloves and daisies is beautiful. That poor lizard must have been traumatized! But your pussy cat looks very laid back despite all the excitement! Have a good week Kris!

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    1. Yes, the lizard showed all signs of panic but it moved fast! It's amazing what small spaces they can get themselves into too.

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  19. I am so enjoying the Eustoma here--thanks for Enabling me. They even have some fragrance.

    The Artichoke arrangement--love it! Have a great time at the Fling.

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    1. Thanks HB. I'm glad the Eustoma has made a favorable impression. I've visions that all mine are going to burst into bloom as soon as I leave town. Re the artichokes, they're surprisingly heavy drinkers - I've had to refill the vase with water daily.

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  20. I remember your gorgeous lisianthus and how lovely it looks in your pretty pink arrangement. The artichokes look fabulous.

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    1. In a couple of photos, the Lisianthus seemed to have a very faint lavender cast. I thought I was imagining that but, as the flower ages what I thought was a pristine white bloom has acquired a distinct lavender blush. That was unexpected.

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  21. Well done for capturing the lizard. There is a mouse frequenting the area immediately beside our kitchen door. It's after bird seed. But someone who shall remain nameless insists on leaving the door open regardless. I know what's going to happen. And just who is going to be left chasing the wretched mouse around the house..

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    1. I'd be more freaked out by a mouse in the house than the lizard, Jessica. I know my cat would be no more effective there than she was in dealing with the lizard. He who shall remain nameless should be assigned responsibility for reconnaissance should it come to that.

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  22. You treat us to three lovely vases....I love the one with the artichokes the best. I used some spiky ones a few weeks ago in a vase, they are really dramatic looking are they not?

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