Monday, November 30, 2015

In a Vase on Monday: Yet more succulents

Camellia sasanqua and Tagetes lemmonii are still blooming in my garden and there are other odds and ends flowering as well but I decided to create another succulent arrangement this week for "In a Vase on Monday," the meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  My last succulent arrangement lasted 6 weeks so I expect the new one should be good until at least New Year's Day.

This week's arrangement started with Graptoveria 'Fred Ives'.  The plant had become very leggy so I didn't feel bad cutting one of its longest stems.  After its performance in the vase, I'll give it a fresh start in the garden.

The somber side of the arrangement

Then I added a lot of Graptosedum.

The lighter side of the arrangement


I filled in with a few other succulents.

Arrangement viewed from above


I cut some Aeonium arboreum but they took up too much room in the vase so I returned them to the garden.  In our climate, they don't need much help to root and form new plants.

This mass started from one stem, a housewarming gift from a friend's garden, and has served as the nursery for Aeonium used elsewhere in my garden


I considered using Euphorbia tirucalli 'Sticks on Fire' as colder weather has turned it pretty shades of orange and red but I didn't want to deal with the toxic sap that weeps from the cut stems so I let it be.

The Euphorbia, shown here growing in a strawberry pot, begs to be noticed this time of year


Here's what I did include:

Clockwise from upper left: Graptoveria 'Fred Ives' has a purplish hue when grown in partial shade but takes on a brighter hue in full sun; Graptosedum 'California Sunset'; Graptosedum 'Darley Sunshine'; a no ID succulent I believe is probably also a Graptopetalum hybrid of some sort; another no ID succulent; Portulacaria afra variegata; Senecio jabobsenii; and Senecio vitalis


This time, I wired only a few of the smaller succulents.  Most had stems long enough to support themselves.  The arrangement sits on the dining room table in an empty basin without water or soil.


The other 3 sides of the vase


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to see what she and other gardeners have created using materials on hand this week.


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

29 comments:

  1. I do not have any succulents in my garden so it is so nice to see your beautiful arrangements, Kris!

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    1. I'm glad to give you an opportunity to enjoy them, Anca.

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  2. This is so creative, Kris, and so pretty - such a good example to the rest of us of thinking out of the box. The views from the various sides look so different, don't they? Thanks for sharing

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  3. Such a great look Kris. Glad you showed exactly which succulents went into your arrangement. I like the red euphorbia too, but can see why you wouldn't want to deal it.

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    1. The Euphorbia 'Sticks on Fire' is best viewed in the garden, Susie. The sap really can have a nasty impact on one's skin.

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  4. Your long-lasting succulent arrangements are always a treat. I can feel the warmth from here which is nice because it's cold today!

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    1. We're feeling the cold too, Peter, although I know your version of cold and ours are very different. Still, it's a shock to our systems when the daytime temperature drops from nearly 90F to the low 60s in the matter of a week.

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  5. These succulent arrangements are sophisticated, elegant and the color palette is so lovely. They are some of my favorites, can you tell? I enjoyed the look at the Momma plant and the plants not chosen as well. There are a very few succulents that will winter over here but they are vulnerable to a protracted hard freeze, which while rare, can happen. Long story longer, I truly enjoy seeing the variety of succulents you are growing!

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    1. Heaven help me if we ever get a freeze, Deb - I'll have mush everywhere!

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  6. How lovely to see a special succulent arrangement. It looks beautiful and just so right for this time of year.

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    1. The ability of succulent arrangements to last several weeks is very appealing at this time of year, Sarah - I know I have something I can leave on the dining room table for the duration of the holiday season if need be.

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  7. I absolutely adore the succulents in your garden...such an array I am not surprised that you could create another stunner...all sides incredibly creative and beautiful Kris!

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    1. Thanks Donna! I'm lucky to have a lot of varieties to choose from.

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  8. Your succulents make such a varied and delightful vase, Kris. They make me homesick for San Diego, where I could grow them outside easily, though some people up here do grow a lot. I appreciate your identification mosaic, it's interesting to see the names. I have the pale bluish mystery Graptopetalum, I've heard the name Ghost Plant or Mother of Pearl Plant. It is amazing, seemingly impossible to kill. The Aeonium nursery is so cute, I like the darker undersides of the leaves.

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    1. I wondered if the gray Graptopetalum might be the variety called 'Ghosty', Hannah. It looks close to the photos I've seen on-line of that plant but, like many succulents, it was sold without a label so I can't be certain.

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  9. 'Fred' makes a great focal point on the somber side, like a big voluptuous flower. You're so good at the mixed succulent arrangements!

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    1. 'Fred' is one of my favorite succulents, Loree. Over time, though, he can develop ridiculously long stalks. I sorely need to replant one container featuring Fred but as there's a very spiky Dyckia in the middle of it, I've had some trepediation about tackling the job.

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  10. Thumbs up Kris..I have Fred here in the ground and he made it through the high 20's temps we had in the last two nights with no damage.

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    1. I've got some 'Fred' in the ground too - he doesn't seem to get as leggy in the ground as in pots. Fortunately, frosts and freezes are low risk here but it's good to know he can take the cold if need be, Kathy.

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  11. I love your succulent arrangement and how fabulous that it will last for so long too!

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    1. Its longevity is of major value, especially this time of year.

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  12. I so love your succulent arrangements, Kris. The colors and textures are so interesting – they make perfect centerpieces that you'd never get tired of looking at. It is amazing to me that they still look good so long without water. But I suppose they are adapted to arid environments, right?
    I noticed your nights have been cold, does that effect your garden?

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    1. Our nighttime temperatures have been in the 40s - cold by our standards but there's little chance that we'll dip near freezing levels, although I suspect that folks in the inland valleys and some of the citrus-growing areas aren't nearly as comfortable. My plants seem less affected by the chill than we are!

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  13. Yeah for succulents. Big thumbs up from me :-).

    I had to toss all my 'Fred Ives' because of a horrendous mealybug infestation. For some reason, they went after this particular variety and left all the other echeverias (and graptopetalums) alone.

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    1. I had some mealybugs on an Agave desmettiana along the street but I caught it early and it looks okay now. My hope is that the cooler weather will head off any recurrence or spread.

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  14. Succulents don't usually "speak" to me, but this arrangement does. It's beautiful. -Jean

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    1. Thanks Jean! Beware - I took a while to warm up to succulents too but, once they gain hold, you can become addicted.

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  15. This is absolutely stunning Kris! I love succulents, but can't grow such a variety due to cold winters and this has really inspired me to look into which ones I could grow long- term outdoors. The vase looks really lovely from all sides. Love that red Euphorbia too. The sap of the Euphorbias I grow is also a problem, which is a shame as they do look nice in arrangements.

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