Saturday, April 11, 2015

De una casa a otra

I received a FedEx delivery yesterday.  It wasn't really a surprise but, as I've been preoccupied with worries about California's new water restrictions and plans to minimize the negative impacts on my garden, the delivery had slipped my mind.  The package, a shipment of bulbs from fellow blogger, Tammy of Casa Mariposa, was just what I needed to put me in a more positive frame of mind.

The bulbs were packaged well and all arrived in perfect condition.



They're a mix of pink and white cultivars of Amaryllis belladonna, popularly known as naked ladies because the blooms arrive on tall stalks after all the foliage dies back.  They didn't like Tammy's Virginia climate but they're well-suited to mine in Southern California as they survive on winter rain and like warm, dry summers.



I had some of the pink variety in my former garden and they did well, returning year after year with little attention.  I've never seen the white form (which you can view a picture of here).

The bulbs have been planted in my backyard border, where they'll get the sun and the drainage they need.  I've placed them where their bare bottoms will be covered behind other plants.

The bulbs have been spread out behind and around the 3 Phormium 'Dark Delight' and between the Cuphea 'Starfire Pink' and the Stipa tenuissima to the right of the Phormium


It remains to be seen as to whether they'll bloom this year.  According to my local garden guide, they can sulk when planted at this time of year.  However, I have no doubt they'll show their pretty faces eventually.

My thanks again to Tammy for brightening my day!


All material © 2012-2015 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

28 comments:

  1. Dear Kris, how nice of Tammy to send you the bulbs! I have the white and pink variety of amaryllis belladonna growing in my garden and they are doing very well, even though I have to say with the heat last year their bloom time was rather short and the flowers didn't last that long. Still they were stunning to look at when they were in their prime.
    I am also get very frustrated when I think about the new water regulations. No doubt they will be very hard on our gardens!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I've felt the presence of the drought since the first year we moved here, Christina, but now it seems a minute doesn't go by without my thinking of water: how to conserve it, how to collect rain, how to retain moisture in the soil. I'm afraid I'm making my husband crazy over the issue.

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  2. That is a true plant lover - to ship bulbs across the country to where they might flourish rather than ignore their plight or worse - relegate them to the compost bin. I look forward to seeing the Ladies in all their glory when that time comes.

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    1. It was VERY good of Tammy to go to the trouble of shipping those bulbs. I'm glad they're so tolerant of hot, dry conditions, as that's what they'll get here.

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  3. Wow - how great of Tammy and what a pick-me-up :) I had no idea there was a white version available (tnx for the link!) and I'll look forward to seeing them from your garden!

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    1. I didn't know they came in pure white either, Amy. If they do well, I hope I can spread them about my garden and also give some away to other gardeners.

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  4. Hooray!! I actually found two more bulbs with burned foliage today. I'll send those in the fall. :o) Lucky for both of us my daylily order arrived in that ventilated box right before I sent the bulbs. Even if they don't do anything til next year, I'm so glad they're in your garden. :o) It's amazing that they survived and multiplied despite our winters. Tough plants!

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    1. If the blurb on the Easy to Grow Bulbs site is to be believed, these lilies couldn't be tougher or less perfect for our current conditions. Thanks again Tammy!

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  5. It's the gardeners' version of Christmas morning! I myself have received special packages from 3 different Santa Clauses, who I have never personally met...

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    1. Blogging does open up a whole new world!

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  6. How delightful! Nothing like a box of plants to brighten the mood!

    I am sorry that California's drought continues and that such severe water restrictions are necessary. A few years ago we had a terrible drought from summer through fall, and I was saving left-over gray water to haul outside to the plants. It was an enormous hassle and a lot of plants suffered. Some died. I don't know a lot about California, but wasn't it originally mostly desert?

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    1. The inland valleys are desert-like but the importation of water from the Colorado River beginning in the early 1900s transformed them into farming powerhouses. The coastal area I live in has a Mediterranean climate, characterized by summer-dry conditions. Despite the fact that I've been swapping out plants for drought tolerant varieties and that I inherited lots of drought tolerant trees, we're in for a tough time with the new water restrictions. My area falls in the high use category (larger than average land parcels, lots of pools, some people with more money than sense in using water) so we have a particularly high water reduction target: 35%.

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  7. What a lovely gift, how kind of Tammy. I' m sure they will do well in your garden.

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  8. Nothing like plant gifts to bring cheer :)

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    1. That's true, although with the new water restrictions looming, I'm nervous about planting anything right now.

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  9. What a wonderful delivery. I have some naked ladies in my garden and it is always a wonderful surprise when they begin blooming.

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    1. Their blooms are always a surprise, aren't they?

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  10. That is such a wonderful gift, and so kind! I'm sure they'll become one of your favourite plants :-)

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    1. They were dependable in my old garden just 15 miles to the north so I hope they'll settle in well here too, Matt.

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  11. A fun surprise to help get your mind off your drought and water restrictions.

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    1. Nothing much diverts me from the water situation for long right now - I'm even dreaming about water collection.

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  12. Great bulbs for California. Your post reminded me that I have a few myself (pink) that I should put in the ground :-)

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    1. Even planted this time of year, Gerhard, they seem to be settling in fine.

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  13. That's great that Tammy sent you those bulbs. I have read that they can skulk quite a while before blooming but that they are practically immortal. My grandfather had them in his garden and I remember thinking how lovely they were.

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    1. It was very kind of Tammy. I had the bulbs in my last garden but it hadn't occurred to me to dig them up and take them with me.

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