Monday, April 28, 2014

In a Vase on Monday: Rose takes a backseat

The few hybrid tea roses I have have been only sporadic bloomers so far this year.  When I saw that one of the 'Medallion' roses had produced a fat bud a few days ago, I targeted it as the centerpiece for my next bouquet.  However, finding other flowers to complement the rose proved more difficult than I'd expected.  The snapdragon with similar colors in my vegetable garden was well past its prime and many of my peach-hued plants had too much pink.  I ended up picking a surprising partner, Tagetes lemmonii (aka Copper Canyon daisy).  Its bright gold flowers have deeper, orange-toned centers, which with the green, gold and orange foliage of Abelia x grandiflora 'Kaleidoscope,' made a nice mix to my eye.  The Tagetes also provide the scent the rose lacks.  The only problem was that the bright color of the daisies had the side-effect of putting the rose in the back-seat in the overall composition.


The Abelia stems come in a range of colors - the plants that get the most sun show the most color variation



Of course, everyone has heard of back-seat drivers and I think 'Medallion' fits the stereotype.




Anagallis 'Wildcat Mandarin' is an attention-getter too but the flowers also do a good job of mediating between the rose and the daisies.  The petals pick up the color of the rose, while the anthers in their center pick up the yellow-gold of the daisies.

Anagallis 'Wildcat Mandarin'

Tagetes lemmonii 'Compacta'



The other components of the bouquet include a few stems of Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold' (Breath of Heaven), Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew), and Justicia brandegeeana (shrimp plant).  I'd planned a larger role for the Justicia but the stems of my still-small plants didn't rise to the occasion.  I used them to dress the back of the bouquet.




This bouquet is my contribution to Cathy's meme at Rambling in the Garden.  Please visit Cathy to see her creation this week and to find links to the posts of other contributors.

16 comments:

  1. Gorgeous! What lovely colours. I am mad about the Anagallis and the rose is sumptuous. It all works very well together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Chloris! The Anagallis is a new hybrid.

      Delete
  2. What a glorious combination, and I think the rose makes it, providing a contrasting form and a more subtle colour. I love the Tagetes lemmonii 'Compacta', I'm not sure we can get it here in the UK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tagetes lemmonii doesn't like a lot of water, Janet, so it may not be suitable to your wetter climate.

      Delete
  3. What a delicious and warm looking combination you have this week Kris, love it!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oh it's similar colours to mine - what a coincidence! The tagetes is lovely (I have grown 'Paprika' for the last couple of years)and I am intrigued by the Anagallis as I have in my head that it is blue... The rose is perfect and the foliage is a great choice - thank you once again for joining in and for your enthusiasm :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd never seen an Anagallis in anything other than blue, Cathy, until I came across this hybrid a couple of months ago. It wasn't in flower when I bought it but I took a chance on it based on the picture on the tag and I'm glad I did.

      Delete
  5. The flowers you chose to complement the rose are perfect, and you did a good job explaining why you chose them. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Your choice of flowers work well together. The rose is gorgeous and I love the colors in the Anagallis. Susie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susie. I inherited the rose with the rose but it's one I really like.

      Delete
  7. A beautiful combination - and so nicely chosen. I especially like the Anagallis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Cathy. The Anagallis - at least this peachy hybrid - is new to me.

      Delete
  8. Really pretty, pleasure to look at it and surely to smell, my kind of thing:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly, the rose has little scent, Aga, but the Tagetes are strongly scented, as are the Coleonema lucked into the back of the arrangement.

      Delete

I enjoy receiving your comments and suggestions. However, with apologies to bona-fide commentators, due to a significant increase in spam, I've eliminated the option to post comments anonymously.