Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Wednesday Vignette: Patience

I've been told - repeatedly - that patience is a virtue.  I can't claim that it's one I possess to any great degree but I'm working on it.  Some plants in my garden test my patience, like the peonies that fail to bloom year after year.  However, I haven't pulled them, at least not yet.  My mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin) tests my patience too.  In mid-April I posted a Wednesday Vignette showing the first leaves on the tree after the major surgery we subjected it to last December.  In earlier years, it's had full leaf coverage as early as late April but, after my initial excitement about its first leaves, it's been slow going again this year.  To be fair, we've had an unusually cool spring, which may have contributed to the delay.

While the leaves close to the tree's base are fully developed, the leaves in the upper canopy have been slow to unfurl

But the good news is that almost all the branches have at least some leaves, which I wasn't able to say last year


So perhaps the major surgery that involved removing half the multi-trunked tree was successful in halting the damage done by the shot hole borer beetles.  Fewer branches should also mean less debris to clean up when this notoriously messy tree sheds both leaves and flowers later in the season.  Patience - it provides perspective.

For more Wednesday Vignettes, visit Anna at Flutter & Hum.


All material © 2012-2019 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

26 comments:

  1. My chocolate albizia has been ever so slowly unfurling its leaves (they sneak into the side of my WV pics today). Then a series of strong winds came through and popped off quite a few of them, it was startling to see them laying on the ground below, looking like large spiders. I hope this is a recovery year for your tree.

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    1. I hope so too, Loree. They're said to be short-lived but this one, in that spot, will be nearly impossible to replace.

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  2. I love mimosa trees! We had them when I lived in Maryland, but the winters are too cold here in Ohio. I must say, that even in MD, they would often die out, bits at a time. They can be difficult. I'm glad yours has some leaves on every branch. Hoping that's a good sign for it's future.

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    1. I'm hoping the tree has at least a few more years of life in it, Cindy.

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  3. I can imagine it's hard to be patient with such a large tree commanding a lot of focus in the yard. I hope the beetles are gone completely and it can recover to its former glory.

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    1. The long-term prognosis for SoCal trees surviving the onslaught of these beetles isn't good but I like to think I've set their march back for a time anyway.

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  4. Darn those beetles. I hope your tree recovers and is soon full of leaves as you envision it. Patience isn't my forte.

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    1. It's never been my strong suit either, Lisa ;)

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  5. I know how this albizia has troubled you for so long, Kris, so I’m really happy to see that has finally come right. It’s looking really healthy now. I’m looking forward to seeing its flowers in a future post.

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    1. Given the slow roll-out of the leaves, Jane, my guess is that the flowers will arrive at roughly the same time the tree finishes leafing out. That what happened last year too.

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  6. It looks quite good compared to the post surgery photos. I like how it frames your view. Patience is a challenge in the garden.

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    1. Post-surgery, I still think the tree looks awkward, Shirley - like it's leaning backwards - when viewed from the side but it does do a nice job framing the harbor view looking east.

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  7. I'm glad to hear your Mimosa tree is filling out--it has such a nifty shape. Patience can be tough, for sure. Sometimes I think I'm a pretty patient person, but when I'm pushed too far, I sometimes lose it. ;-)

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    1. Luckily for the mimosa, taking it out isn't something that can be done on a momentary whim!

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  8. Ugh, I feel for you. I really do hope this keeps those little buggers at bay for a long time. Trees - even those that try our patience - are treasures. I dread even the thought of losing the Magnolia, even though the endless fall of hard, crunchy leaves drives me bonkers. It's still magnificent - despite all it's suffered through in the past few years. Fingers crossed for your tree!

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    1. I can understand the mixed feeling about the Magnolia too - my own is also a major source of litter but the front garden wouldn't be the same without it.

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  9. What a beautiful shape it has. Looks like it has a solid chance, fingers crossed.

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  10. It has an excellent silhouette right now. The trimmers did a pretty fair job saving what they could. The rain can't have hurt.

    I'm endlessly patient in some respects, and totally lacking patience in others. I guess it is a matter of priorities.

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    1. Priorities, yes, and, in this case, the sheer difficulty of both removing and replacing the tree argues loudly in favor of patience.

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  11. The tree surgeon did a good job, the mimosa is such a beautiful shape in that view. I wish it well.
    Any news on the building project? Or have I missed it? Blogging has been an opportunistic thing for me these last few weeks.

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    1. I suppose I should have used this post on patience to touch on the remodel project, Jessica. We've had one delay after another, despite my husband's concerted efforts to keep things moving. We finally got approval from the AQMD (Air Quality Management District) on Wednesday but our contractor will be out of town until Monday, when we should get our permits. We may have a guy in next week to start removing the part of our back patio affected by the plan to push out the kitchen wall late next week. And we'll probably be waiting at least another week beyond that for the crew needed to handle the asbestos removal at the start of demolition. I'd like to say we'll be off and running at that point but I don't want to jinx our prospects in doing so. Patience is a virtue, patience is a virtue...

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  12. Patience, oh dear, let's not go there! I am so not a patient person. But hopefully your Albizia will be okay. It sure looks nice against that blue sky.

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    1. It's a pretty tree when it's got foliage and even prettier with flowers, neither of which last long enough. I hope I can hold on to it for at least a few more years too.

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  13. I'm so glad that your tree is recovering - it's certainly on the right track. We had a couple of very large spruce tree (i.e. about 30-40' tall) transplanted a couple of years ago & one of them is not looking that great - it's somewhat bronzed and has nowhere near the amount of new growth that the other one has. The good news is that at least there is SOME new growth which I'm taking as a positive sign that it's recovering, albeit slowly.

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    1. Insect-borne diseases have become a plague on trees in California, abetted by persistent drought. Sadly, our tree canopy seems to be slowing disappearing all over.

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