Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Wednesday Vignette: Perfect moments

Early Sunday morning, when the sun was barely up, I woke to rain.  It was light and didn't last long but I appreciated the moment.  Everything was suddenly cleaner, fresher and brighter.

Rain clouds passing over our backyard and the Los Angeles Harbor


We picked up 0.07/inch of rain, raising our seasonal total (registered since October 1st) to 0.15/inch.  Of course, I would have liked to have seen more but, for that moment at least, it was enough.  It scrubbed away the gray haze that usually hangs over the horizon and the whole world, or at least my little corner of it, seemed shiny and bright.

As the rain passed on, the sun broke through the clouds

I spent the day in the garden clearing out summer's losses, cutting back plants, spreading compost, planting seeds and recent purchases, and moving existing plants that needed moving.  It was glorious and the weather couldn't have been more perfect.



Late that evening I heard the news about the shooting in Texas, which I found heartbreaking and crushingly depressing even though I'd come to believe that I'd been desensitized to these events, which our elected federal officials have repeatedly shown themselves incapable of addressing constructively.  I even wondered how I could have felt such joy Sunday morning about a mere shift in the weather when a thousand miles away a church full of people had been shot, whether I knew about it or not. But terrible things happen all over the world every day and I realized that each one of us must treasure those perfect moments when they materialize, if only to maintain our own sanity.  So, instead of crawling into a deep hole of despair, I threw myself back into work in the garden the following day.  I also rededicated myself to the philosophy of "thinking globally and acting locally," not only with respect to environmental issues but also social issues.  If we demand rational action rather than meaningless repetitious platitudes from our officials, perhaps common sense will prevail, eventually.  I realize that a failure to report the shooter's history of domestic violence made it possible for him to purchase the weapons used in Sunday's attack, but that ignores the facts that many US states still don't have laws limiting gun purchases by those convicted of domestic violence, previously shown to correlate with gun violence.  And, as I've already taken my garden blog further into social issues than I should, I won't even start on the pervasive gun show loopholes.

My photos of clear skies, shimmering ocean water, and bright sunlight are my Wednesday Vignette.  For more, visit Anna at Flutter & Hum.


All material © 2012-2017 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party


18 comments:

  1. Oh Kris - I think it's totally fine to bring social and political issues into a garden blog. (Says I, who do it all the time... :D ) But seriously, remember that old Peter Sellers movie 'Being there'? The changing seasons of a garden can very well be applied to the cause and effect we humans orchestrate in our political lives. One kind of cultivation versus another. IMHO.

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    1. My only concern, Anna, is that, to the extent that people seek out garden blogs as relief from the intensity of the current political climate, I don't want them to feel they've lost a legitimate refuge from that stress and anxiety.

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  2. Oh yes! It's entirely appropriate to merge a garden blog and political issues. We must continue to speak up! Have you by chance read this from the NYT? It's good: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/world/americas/mass-shootings-us-international.html

    I'm glad you had a glorious day in the garden, we all need those from time to time!

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    1. Thanks to the link to the NYT article, Loree. I wish someone would come up with an explanation for why Americans so love their guns. Is it a historical artifact stemming from the American Revolution, a reflection of deep-seated anxiety about personal security, or something else entirely?

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  3. I'll be perfectly honest, I like politics in moderation in a gardening blog as long as it is in keeping with my own political bent, which yours is. I stopped reading at least a few blogs in the last several years when they started protesting against things Pres. Obama was doing, or when it became obvious through things they wrote that they were right-wing. And your reflections here on how the shootings affected you are thoughtful. My garden has been keeping me sane for the past year. I very much like that second shot, with the bright sun and its star-like corona.

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    1. It's hard to stop feelings from spilling out at times, Alison. This most recent incident, much like Sandy Hook, affected me deeply.

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  4. You're right, the glorious moments of joy we find are precious and should be enjoyed to the fullest. Enjoy your pictures and politics.

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    1. Thanks Peter. that photo of the sun shining over the harbor against clear skies was wonderful, wasn't it?

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  5. We enjoyed a day of cold, drizzly, but cleansing and deeply refreshing rain here in Virginia.

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    1. I expect your version of cold and ours are different things, Nell. I'm cold when it's 60F outside but, in any urban or suburban area these days, those cleansing rains are a joy regardless of the temperature.

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    2. Well, though the actual rain was needed, my comment was a metaphorical leetle joke about Tuesday's other event in Virginia. ;>

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    3. I wasn't sure and didn't want to presume, Nell! My friends and I were dancing here in celebration of the VA event too!

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  6. What beautiful clouds. I'm with you on that inaction thing. It's so frustrating.

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    1. It's completely illogical. A classic example of the definition of insanity.

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  7. I think the only way to lift the vibration is to focus on the positive, and what action steps will bring the result we are looking for. When we create beauty and share it, we are doing just that. Thanks for sharing your beautiful day with us!

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    1. I like that philosophy, Eliza! It's just hard to act on sometimes.

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  8. A sprinkle of politics fits with the down to earth reality of gardening.

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    1. Thanks for the comment, Diana. Sometimes it's just too hard to remain silent.

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