Monday, October 10, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Shades of Yellow

I spent the weekend gallivanting (aka crawling nurseries or plant shopping), which left me scrambling to cut, arrange and photograph arrangements for "In a Vase on Monday" late on Sunday afternoon.  I prefer to do this early in the morning as plant materials are fresher and the light is much better.  I'd hoped to cut flowers and foliage before my friend arrived Sunday morning but, upon stepping outside, discovered that my garden had been thoroughly trounced overnight by what must have been an entire legion of raccoons so, instead of cutting flowers, I spent half an hour trying to restore a semblance of order.  This is a long-winded way of explaining the poor quality of the photos in this week's post.

The Senna bicapsularis I used in one of last week's vases is now in full bloom so I cut more of that, which set me on a yellow theme.

Front view

Top view

From the left, the vase contains: Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Senna bicapsularis, and Gaillardia aristata 'Gallo Peach'.  (Tanacetum parthenium was also included.)


What didn't fit in the first vase filled 2 others, the first of which is an eclectic mix.

A single stem of Anemone hupehensis japonica bloomed in our backyard border, a relic of the garden's past when water was more plentiful.  I brought it inside so I could more thoroughly appreciate its fleeting beauty.

In addition to the anemone, this vase contains Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' and Phylica pubescens


I had only cream-colored Zinnias left after outfitting the second vase so I recycled the silvery Leucadendron stems from last week's arrangements and added 2 stems of pale yellow Eustoma grandiflorum to complete a third arrangement, using a decorative teapot that formerly belonged to my mother-in-law as a vase.  This one is my personal favorite this week.

Front view

Back view

Top view

This vase contains: Pale yellow Eustoma grandiflorum (one stem bearing flowers with a slight pink blush), Leucadendron 'Pisa', and Zinnia 'Profusion White'


The 3 vases assumed positions in the usual spots.

This is the best photo I could manage of the first vase in the front entryway.  The glare of the setting sun streamed through the glass inserts in our front door making a clearer photo impossible.

The second arrangement sits on the mantle in the master bedroom (where hopefully the cat will not knock it down)

And the teapot arrangement sits on the dining room table


Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to find what she and other "IaVoM" participants have put together this week.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

26 comments:

  1. Thank goodness we don't have racoons in the UK! Hope there has been no lasting damage done :( Not sure which my favourite is, but the leaf vase itself is a definite favourite. I would snap up one of those if I saw one! I shall be sorry to see the last of your eustoma this year Kris - do you think this is it...? Thanks for sharing

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    1. Unlike deer or rabbits, raccoons at least don't eat plants - they just toss them about in the relentless pursuit of grubs and generally make a mess. As to the Eustoma, as I recall, I've had blooms into November in prior years. We don't get frosts but the plants do like to take a rest between bloom cycles so I'm not expecting much from December through April.

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  2. Oh, how I know that sinking feeling in your stomach when you discover raccoon destruction. I love the light colors in your vases today. And how absolutely adorable is that wee mouse riding on a butterfly! I wish I had half your talent, both for putting these together and for nurturing such a flower-filled and beautiful drought-tolerant garden.

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    1. The raccoons had gone easy on me for awhile so I lulled myself into a false sense of security, Alison. Given that they left virtually no area of my garden untouched, I'm wondering if mama raccoon brought her little ones with her for a lesson in grub hunting.

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  3. Always enjoy your vases but especially admire that second one today.

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    1. After seeing Japanese anemones in many of the "IaVoM" vases over the past few weeks, I was happy to have one stem of my own to enjoy, Susie.

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  4. i think you overcame the raccoon trauma in style, love that yellow vase. And the Gallardias you have are always wonderful. I keep looking at seeds...

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    1. I do love that peach Gaillardia. It's been hard to find this year.

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  5. They are all beautiful. I love that second vase. It's really cool.

    Raccoons in the neighborhood, but so far no interest in my garden.

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    1. Maybe Boris and Natasha have the raccoons steering clear of your garden? Pipig is absolutely no help. I'd love to have a dog but then I probably wouldn't allow him/her out at night anyway because of the coyotes in the neighborhood.

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  6. Sorry to hear of your raccoon rampage, Kris, they possibly attacked our poultry when we had them but I'm not aware of other damage. All your vases look lovely, I like the peachy Gaillardia, abundant Senna, and Agonis in the first vase. The leaf vase in the second arrangement is my favorite since I collect a lot of leaf themed items, the feathery Phylica goes so well with the Anemones, favorite fall flowers here, and the always delightful Grevillea. The sumptuous Leucadendron really enlivens the last charming teapot, and I always enjoy seeing the Eustoma, I will really have to grow some someday.

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    1. The raccoons have been showing up again with regularity over the past couple of months but the extensiveness of this intrusions exceeded any of their prior visits. It was either a mass of raccoons or one very hyperactive individual.

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  7. I'm loving the pale yellow and white color palette this week, Kris. So pretty and the teapot and shell vase compliment the colors so well. I very much admire the Gaillardia aristata 'Gallo Peach' and Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' - the soft colors are beautiful.

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    1. I'm glad you liked them, Eliza. I admit that I have a preference for soft floral colors too.

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  8. Well, I'm not about to pick a favorite... I love all three of them. In addition to the wonderful floral material, I always admire your choices of foliage, and these vases are no exception (still eyeing that Phylica...). And it must be fun to fill that teapot full of flowers :)

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    1. The Phylica is my most recent plant crush. The one I planted on a large pot has done very well but the 2 I planted directly in the garden (shortly before that June heatwave) quickly expired. I've got a second, seedling-sized plant in another pot but I MAY try planting it in the garden if we get any real rain this winter.

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  9. Sorry to hear that the Raccoons are back; I hope you didn't lose any favourite plants. All three vases are lovely; I am always surprised how many blooms you have to pick from your garden.

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    1. Only a few succulent cuttings were torn out but the critters tunneled around plants throughout the garden, leaving roots exposed, hence the sense of urgency about putting things right. They even dug holes underneath some of the thyme growing between stepping stones. All I can say is that grubs must be VERY tasty.

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  10. Beautiful! I should think about using teapots as vases. I've used pitchers but the teapot makes a charming vase. Since you can grow what I consider some unusual flowers I like that you identify them. I was surprised that those little daisies were zinnias. I forget that they come in lots of shapes.

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    1. I tend to forget about the vessels that aren't in my vase cabinet too, Linda. The little cream-colored Zinnias aren't fancy but they've been the most vigorous of any of those I planted this year.

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  11. Oh, those darned raccoons! Your arrangements breathe summer warmth to our cold autumn morning. Very cheerful and bright. The teapot as vase idea is great and I may borrow it.

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    1. I know you've had your own trials and tribulations with raccoons too, Peter. Do you think they're the devil's minions, or just misunderstood?

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  12. Oh yes, the teapot is my favourite one too, but I do love the vase you used for the second one, and the yellow theme is lovely as well. That Grevillea is a gorgeous colour and looks beautiful with the anemone. Such a shame your anemones are short-lived. Mine have been flowering for almost three months now but are looking a bit raggedy!

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    1. Unfortunately, the anemones don't get enough water here to do well, Cathy. There were no blooms at all last year or the year before as I recall so I was surprised and pleased just to get a few blooms.

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  13. What fun you must have choosing your flowers every week. Always something different and always a stunning presentation. I think you could put together a book of your designs. On the front cover I would put the leaf vase arrangement. It is gorgeous.

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    1. That leaf vase (a birthday present from my husband earlier this year) makes everything look good, Jenny.

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