Sunday, October 16, 2016

Foliage Follow-up: The Old & the New

I had just a little time for a Foliage Follow-up post so this one will be shorter than usual.

The bed on the north side of  front door grabbed my attention as it's come together as I originally envisioned it (which isn't the norm).  It was planted in December 2014.

The bed's centerpiece is Leptosperman 'Copper Glow'.  The brightest spots of color in this view are provided by Phormium 'Maori Queen', Coprosma repens 'Evening Glow' and Lomandra 'Lime Tuff'.  The gray foliage plants are Arctotis 'Pink Sugar' (which won't bloom again until late winter or early spring), Lavandula stoechas 'Silver Anouk' and Artemisia 'Powis Castle'.


I haven't gone through all the photos I took on last week's fall plant shopping expedition but I thought I'd also share the foliage plants I purchased.  Not surprisingly perhaps, they're all succulents.

All these succulents were purchased on my trip to Ventura Cactus & Succulents without labels.  I can identify 3 of them with a degree of confidence but the best I can do is guess at the genera of the other 2.  Clockwise from the upper left, we have: Aeonium 'Sundrops', a noID Crassula (maybe a C. pubescens of some variety), a noID Euphorbia (I'm really unsure of this one), Dyckia 'Naked Lady', and Gasteria bicolor var. liliputana.

Aeonium 'Velour', purchased at Seaside Gardens Nursery in Carpinteria

Synadenium grantii 'Rubra' (aka African Milk Bush), picked up at Deep Roots in Manhattan Beach.  I'd admired this plant for some time but had forgotten how big it can get (and the label omitted that information).  I decided it would be safest for me to grow it in a large pot for now.


Visit Pam at Digging for more Foliage Follow-up posts.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

16 comments:

  1. Ah, now I'm morning the Synadenium grantii 'Rubra' I grew as an annual. It was beautiful while it lasted. Your new plants are all fabulous, as is that planting area you featured at the top of the post. I need to get back down to CA so I can visit your garden!

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  2. Thank you for your greeting.
    Look to your Verbena bonariensis in the last post, it blooming now at my place also
    Mariana

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    1. It is a remarkable thing when we are both growing the same plant, Mariana!

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  3. I have to say that is a great foliage combo you have created. Isn't it nice when something actually works out the way we envisioned it!

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    1. It comes together all too seldom for me, Linda!

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  4. You get to play with the best plant textures and colors! I love the red-tinged Aeonium and Crassula and your yellow Phormium. Who needs flowers? ;)

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    1. I've developed a greater appreciation for the variations among foliage plants since moving here but I still love flowers!

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  5. The colors and textures of those succulents are fabulous and I love your gardens!

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  6. Your front garden bed is lovely--interesting foliage but, at the same time repetition and cohesion. It feels good, doesn't it, when design works as intended?!--never a sure thing when designing with plants.

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    1. Nope, it's never a sure thing. And sometimes it only works for a while.

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    1. I still wish I knew what that Euphorbia-like plant is - and, more importantly, how big it gets!

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  8. The balance of colors and textures in your north side of the door bed is terrific! Love your new plants!

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    1. If only all my planting beds came together so well!

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