Monday, March 14, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: Spring Stampede

It feels as though everything in my garden wants to bloom at once.  Many of the winter bloomers made late arrivals and the spring bloomers are now off and running too.  The embarrassment of riches in terms of floral choices could have set my head spinning but I focused my attention on the climbing rose offering its first flush of bloom and let that direct me in preparing this week's arrangement for "In a Vase on Monday," the meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  However, I did stuff the vase full of flowers.

The front view emphasizes the coral colors of the rose

The back view shows off some of my yellow flowers

The top view merges both colors


Here's what I included:

Clockwise from the upper left: 'Joseph's Coat' climbing rose, Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Cotula lineariloba 'Big Yellow Moon', a red Freesia, yellow Freesia, Heuchera sanguinea 'Bressingham Hybrids', Narcissus 'White Lion', and a noID Narcissus with Coleonema album

The new vase sits on the dining room table


But wait!  There's more.  (Do I sound like an infomercial?)  The orchid arrangement that had been sitting on the dining room table for 2 weeks was looking haggard but the Cymbidium centerpiece was still in perfect condition.  I threw away the other contents of the vase and created a new one using that same Cymbidium flower stalk.

The buds at the top of the Cymbidium's flower stalk have opened since I created the original arrangement for my February 29th "IAVOM" post

Left: close-up of Cymbidium Sussex Court 'Not Peace' shown surrounded by Leptospermum scoparium 'Pink Pearl'; right: Coleonema album

I was tired of breakfasting with the Cymbidium so, this week, it landed in the front entryway


No, I didn't stop there.  With some rain expected Sunday evening, I decided to "rescue" a few of my Camellias as they don't usually look their best after rain.

Camellia hybrid 'Taylor's Perfection' has been blooming for 6 weeks and hasn't received the attention it deserves


I briefly considered creating a blue or purple arrangement as well but I stopped myself.  Maybe next week.

Visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden to see what she and other contributors have come up with this week.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

38 comments:

  1. Wow! Fantastic, I feel like you can grow everything there! From Narcissus to Roses and Orchids and all at once. I really love that Camellia arrangement, I am a Southerner and miss Camellias, especially the floating ones, reminds me of my mother and grandmother.

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    1. Sadly, I can't grow peonies - or tulips. Anything that needs a good winter chill is a problem. Camellias grow well here as long as they get sufficient protection from the sun but, with the drought, their water needs are a problem. The Camellias here were planted before the drought was declared.

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  2. So many flowers--a nice "problem" to have on Monday. That first arrangement is striking from front and back, but I really love the view from overhead. All the colors work so well together. Beautiful camellia too! Didn't realize a cut orchid would survive so long--nice to recreate a design around it. Have a good week. (BTW, I saw the views of your garden makeover. You've really been busy planting and it all looks wonderful.)

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    1. Cymbidiums do have long vase lives, Susie. I don't know if that's true of other orchids - I may have to experiment.

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  3. I love how different your first arrangement is depending on whether you're looking at its front side or its backside. Love it best from the front though, that two-tone rose hits all my buttons!

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    1. I love that rose too. It doesn't last particularly long in a vase but it's beautiful in the garden.

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  4. Beautiful!I wonder how Narcissus and Coral Bells are in bloom at the same time, as in my region the Coral Bells are summer flowers.

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    1. Our summers are so hot that few of these flowers could survive them, Anca - they have to bloom in spring!

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  5. It seems so strange to see roses blooming with narcissi - roses are a summer flower here. Your flowers are lovely together and I love all your vases this week. It is such a good idea to bring the camellia flowers inside before they are ruined by the weather - I must remember to do that with my next new flowers.

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    1. Roses have long bloom periods here, Julie, although in my garden the spring flushes are usually the strongest.

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  6. Oh my a climbing rose already....although I shouldn't be surprised as my brother had a rose blooming while I was there....and what a stunning array of flowers and colors...such a delight!

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    1. California is a very different world, Donna!

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  7. Your flower choices are amazing to those of us in colder climates, Kris! I love the peachy tones of 'Joseph's Coat', and it looks amazing with the yellow Freesias and pink Heucheras. I thought at first the Cotula was yellow Freesia buds, what interesting balls, too bad it is proving invasive. The tiny Cotula I grew slowly lost ground and disappeared. I had similar long-lasting success with orchids in a vase, I couldn't believe how they stayed the same for 2-3 weeks. The orchids look fabulous with the small light pink and white flowers, too. And the double-sided vases never cease to impress me as well!

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    1. I have 2 Cotulas in my garden, Hannah, and I have to say I prefer the smaller, 'Tiffendell Gold' selection. It also forms a nice mat of foliage but the plant is much smaller and doesn't crawl over its companions as does C. lineariloba.

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  8. Your 'Joseph's Coat' climbing rose gets me every time. It's gorgeous, and I don't even like roses. Your simple treatment of the Camellia blossoms is also stunning.

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    1. 'Joseph's Coat' is better in the garden, crawling up our stone chimney, than it is in a vase, Loree. The flowers are looser and much less formal than those on hybrid tea roses.

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  9. Beautiful! And so many different colors. Do we get to see your blue vase next week?

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  10. Oh what joy, Kris, what bounty! Your first vase just glows - it's stunning and the orchids are a picture with the leptospermum. All delightful :)

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    1. Thanks Cathy! When spring arrives here, it really makes itself known.

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  11. They are all just beautiful, Kris, the first one looks like a tropical cocktail. How lucky you are to have such a bountiful garden. :) PS: Again I'm having huge problems to comment...Happy spring days, Annette

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    1. I'm sorry about the ongoing problem with leaving comments, Annette. I'll look at my options again but I think the only Blogger option I don't have turned on is the one that allows anonymous posters. I shut that down to address a horrible spam problem last year.

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  12. I'm so pleased that you have showcased so many arrangements Kris, and I love that Letospermum...I was beginning to feel that I was maybe overdoing my vases. I usually change things during the week, and when we were down to only one, Mr S mentioned that things were looking a little bare, success...he loves a range too!

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    1. In my view, every room deserves a fresh bouquet of flowers, Noelle!

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  13. Just went and looked up Leptospermum Kris, and they are part of the myrtle family! I shall be working out if the conditions in my garden are suitable, and will certainly look out for a couple if that is the case. Thanks again.

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    1. I love Leptospermums, which frequently grow to tree-like proportions here. They're native to Australia and New Zealand but L. scoparium can be grown in a pot and hauled under cover if cold is an issue in your area.

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  14. Beautiful bouquets!
    Nice when they are long lasting in the vase.
    Mariana

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    1. I think the Cymbidiums beat out all other flowers when it comes to their vase life, Mariana.

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  15. It sounds as if you have got spring fever Kris! Your first vase is absolutely gorgeous. Those corals are beautiful and the overall colour mix too. The second is so very different, and good to see your Cymbidum lasts so well too. And when I saw the last one I thought you had water lilies! Lovely! Enjoy your garden this week! :)

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    1. Unfortunately, there's not enough water available for me to grow real water lilies here but the Camellias do make a nice, if short-lived, substitute!

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  16. Love the beautiful mix you've created here, Kris!

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  17. I really love the first bouquet - it's so vibrant and colorful, absolutely gorgeous! I am really smitten with the pink Heuchera and Narcissus 'White Lion'. 'Taylor's Perfection' too, I will have to look into getting that one. It's well named.

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    1. Camellia 'Taylor's Perfection' is a hybrid. My, admittedly vague, recollection is that its parents are C. japonica and C. williamsii.

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  18. Such an over achiever. Your arrangements are always gorgeous and especially so because all of their contents come from your own garden! I especially like the first arrangement with its happy and warm colors!

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    1. That was my favorite too, Peter, although I am impressed with the orchid's staying power.

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  19. Roses already Kris - oh lucky you! A fabulous trio of vases.

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