Monday, March 28, 2016

In a Vase on Monday: An angel by any name

My roses are starting to bloom.  The beautiful noID lavender rose had two large blooms I couldn't resist cutting for my contribution to "In a Vase on Monday," the weekly meme hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  I thought I'd match them with some of the other lavender blooms I had in the backyard but the roses have a lot of pink in them and the other flowers looked dull by comparison.  So, I improvised.

Front view

Back view

Top view


The lavender rose came with the house.  Unlike some of my other inherited roses, it had no identification tag.  While its color and scent reminds me of 'Angel Face', the blooms are larger than those of the cultivar I had in my former garden but perhaps this shrub is simply more robust than my former specimen.

Clockwise from the upper left, the vase contains: 2 stems of the noID lavender rose; a noID Alstroemeria; a noID Antirrhinum, shown here with Heuchera maxima, a California native; Argyranthemum frutescens 'Angelic Giant Pink'; Hebe 'Wiri Blush', shown with a peek of Penstemon parryi; and what I think is Prunus  laurocerasus


I REALLY didn't intend to put together a second vase this week.  But then I discovered that one of the Hippeastrum I planted in the succulent bed along the street 3 years ago was in bloom.  I'd been waiting weeks for the bud to open.  I figured it wouldn't be in good shape for next week's vase so I went ahead and cut the stem, then hurriedly collected foliage and flowers to accompany it.

Front view

Clockwise from the left, the vase contains stems of: Hippeastrum cybister 'Emerald', Agonis flexuosa 'Nana', Coprosma repens 'Plum Hussey', Heuchera 'Bressingham Hybrids', and Leucadendron 'Pisa'


The two arrangements properly dressed up the house to celebrate Easter and the official start of spring.  The lavender rose arrangement sits on the dining room table.  (I finally tossed the Cymbidium and the rest of that vases's contents.)



Last week's pink arrangement in the master bedroom was replaced by the vase with the Hippeastrum.



Speaking of Easter, my brother sent me his own personal Easter greeting, in the form of a photo he took in 2014.

Photo used with the permission of ericnp.net


While I'm sure you wouldn't be happy to find this hare in your garden, the look of annoyance on his face at being caught in the act, "deadheading" flowers, is precious.  My brother is a much better photographer than I am.  His 2015 garden photos can be found here.

For more "IAVOM" posts, visit our host, Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.


All material © 2012-2016 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

30 comments:

  1. What a great photo of the hare! Your brother is indeed talented. Love both your vases this week, but especially that Hippeastrum.

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    1. I enjoyed that photo. I imagine the hare thinking "oh drat, another photographer."

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  2. Oh that devil of a hare! I didn't think you could top the rose and Alstroemeria vase which is stunning from all views even overhead, but oh the Hippeastrum vase is just as lovely Kris!

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    1. I meant to check the status of the Hippeastrum bud before selecting flowers for this week's vase but the thought flew out of my head when I saw those lavender roses, only to resettle there after I'd finished my first arrangement.

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  3. One must strike while the hippieastrum is hot. Your arrangements are very bright and cheerful, featuring flowers that won't bloom here until summer. Happy Easter, Kris!

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    1. Flowers here know they've got to bloom when the temperatures are still consistently below 90F, or risk shriveling in bud.

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  4. Oh the rose and alstoemeria are perfect together - and how wonderful to be growing hippeastrum outside. I think there are some varieties that are becoming available in the UK that will grow outside so I will perhaps give them a try one year. Thnaks for sharing - oh, and lovely to see the hare too!

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    1. My Hippeastrum naturalized beautifully in my old garden but I worried that the somewhat higher temperatures here might toast them. Such hasn't been the case (so far at least), although they don't seem to multiply as quickly here.

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  5. The Hippeastrum is marvelous and I love what you put with it. Beautiful arrangements per usual, Kris!

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    1. Thanks, Eliza! I put that Hippeastrum arrangement together on the fly with little thought but I do like how it came out.

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  6. Oh is that the same rose that only had the one flower last year Kris? If so it's already doing better than last season :) It's a most appealing colour. A fabulous photo by your brother.

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    1. You have a great memory, Anna! I think that is the rose I complained about last year. Truthfully, none of my roses did much of anything last year but all seem to be doing a bit better this year. I think the rain we got, while meager, was timed just right.

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  7. You are so lucky to have roses in tour garden already Kris! I am always jealous when I see your vases but especially so this week - my roses are just sticks in the ground right now. I had a look at your brothers photos - he really is very talented!

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    1. Roses do bloom early here, Julie - that's one benefit of having no real winter. Whether we'll have any blooms once the heat turns up is the big question.

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  8. That lavender rose is stunning, Kris!And when you think that mine are just sticks in the ground as Julie says!

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    1. In summer, my roses may just be sticks with foliage here and there, Anca, while your roses will probably be fabulous!

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  9. Kris, you've put together gorgeous arrangements. The no-name rose is really lovely and that Hippeastrum makes a striking feature. Great photo from your brother.

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    1. My brother has a talent for capturing the essence of wild creatures on camera. His hummingbird photos put mine to shame!

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  10. Hi Kris, that Hippeastrum flower is simply stunning! So gorgeous, I could just swoon... I was also happy to see that you used roses today in your other bouquet. It is very hard to identify a rose seen on a photo only, but I doubt that this rose is 'Angel Face', if the color is caught accurately by your camera. 'Angel Face' should be more lavender color than that deep saturated pink and the rose petals should also be a little bit more ruffled. But the question is, if it is not 'Angel Face' what else could it be? In any case, it is a very pretty rose bloom.
    Wishing you a great week!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. The rose becomes a lot more lavender as it ages but I don't think it's 'Angel Face' either; however, I haven't a clue what its name is. I haven't been successful matching the flowers against on-line photos or plants in the local nurseries.

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  11. Your pink vase is so romantic, Kris, with the large roses and the spectacular Alstroemeria. I knew I would regret not trying to grow it, but maybe there is still a potted one in my future. The other vase is so dramatic with the green and red Amaryllis, my late-started one has awakened and has a flower stalk growing up. The Coprosma leaves are terrific accents for them.

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    1. You should certainly try Alstroemeria, Hannah. I can't speak to the cold hardiness of the plant in general but mine die back to the ground in summer (in response to our heat) so perhaps they'd be protected from your winter cold. I used to have an evergreen Alstroemeria, which also grew much taller than those I inherited with this garden, but I suspect that variety would be less cold (and heat) hardy.

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  12. I'm sorry but that Hippeastrum vase steals the show for me, it's just amazing!!! Well done.

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    1. I do hope the Hippeastrums naturalize there along the street - it'd be nice to have a mass of them in bloom.

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  13. Lovely vases Kris; I'm still envious of the Alstroemeria!

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    1. Alstroemeria does well here, at least in spring when the temperatures are still consistently comfortable. I just read that high soil temperatures send the plants into retreat, which explains why they don't hang around into summer here.

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  14. You are pretty in pink Kris, with your lovely summery Easter arrangements. Gorgeous! And the indignant hare is priceless. A wonderful shot.

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    1. Luckily, that hare was in a public area rather than a private garden where the havoc he caused didn't cause apoplexy on the part of the gardener.

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  15. That photo really does capture the moment well - thanks for sharing with us! As always you have some gorgeous flowers again - the Hippeastrum really caught my eye, as did the Alstroemeria in your first vase. I was given a bouquet last week and it had some in it, which made me think of you! I think I have only ever seen it at the florists here, so must go and google what the plant itself looks like!

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    1. There's at least one fancy variegated leafed variety of Alstroemeria on the market now ('Rock & Roll') but most of the varieties, including mine, have unexceptional foliage, Cathy. In your climate I'd expect they'd have to winter in a greenhouse but they can definitely be treated as potted plants.

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