Monday, July 7, 2014

In a Vase on Monday: It started with a rose...

There aren't many roses in bloom in my garden at present and those that do appear don't last long so, when I saw that 'California Dreamin' had a bud opening, I clipped it and, as Cathy at Rambling in the Garden does, I wandered about my own garden looking for suitable partners to go in today's vase.  I didn't start this week's project with selections in mind as I often do.  I wasn't even sure there was much out there that I hadn't already used in one form or another.  So I was surprised how well this vase came together.




Unlike many of my bouquets, this one was no struggle to photograph.  In fact, this one wasn't capable of producing a bad photo.

Photo taken from above the bouquet looking downward



This bouquet may be my personal favorite thus far.  Here's what I used:


  • 1 rose bud ('California Dreamin' rose)
  • 3 stems of Bulbine frutescens, yellow variety
  • 1 Dahlia 'Fringed Star'
  • 2 stems of Digitalis x mertonensis 'Polka Dot Pippa' (with the persistent aphids removed)
  • 1 stem of Grevillea 'Superb' containing 2 mature flowers
  • 3 stems of Leucadendron salignum 'Chief' 
  • 3 stems of Origanum 'Monterey Bay'
  • 2 stems of the always useful Tanacetum parthenium 'Aureum' (aka golden feverfew)



Close-up of 'California Dreamin' rose

Close-up of yellow Bulbine frutescens with Digitalis x mertonensis below

Close-up of Dahlia 'Fringed Star,' which has a lot less pink than than the photo attached to the bulb package

Close-up of Grevillea 'Superb,' the blooms of which start out a yellowish peach and turn pinkish coral as they age 

Back of the bouquet, which highlights Leucadendron salignum 'Chief' and Origanum 'Monterey Bay'



The vase in this case is a decorative teapot given to my mother-in-law by one of her neighbors several months prior to her death.  I brought it home last year when my husband and I cleared her home for sale, planning to use it to hold flowers.  This is the first time I've done so and, even though it isn't a family heirloom, it reminds me of her.

What better place for a teapot masquerading as a vase than the kitchen.  It brightens the mostly white space, doesn't it?

The lemons from the tree at the bottom of our slope even make a nice accent



If you have a vase of flowers collected from your garden sitting on a countertop this morning, post a picture and link up to Cathy's "In a Vase on Monday" meme at Rambling in the Garden.

20 comments:

  1. Oh isn't the process of choosing additional blooms intriguing?! Some things that have been included one mightn't at first have thought would complement the others, but they really do. The different shades in the dahlia and foxglove for example help draw the other blooms together and it works really well Great to use the teapot as a vase - I must remember I have a vintage chicken teapot which has lost its lid and would make a great vase. Thanks as always for your enthusiasm :)

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    1. I have a tendency to seek harmony rather than contrast in putting together both my garden and bouquets but I'm trying to push the envelope a bit further with both now. I still look for colors that will mediate the color differences, though. Too much contrast puts me on edge.

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  2. Kris, I really like the last photo with the lemons. I wish I had more options for cutting, but my garden is so small that I just hate to cut anything! I compensate by making small nosegays with some of the roses and herbs. I put them in a little vintage milk carafe that I got from a flea market. Your tea pot is beautiful and so is your arrangement. The teapot makes a perfect vase. Recently I took a flower arranging class at the Huntington Library/Botanical gardens that was put on by Flower Duet. It was a lot of fun and very interesting (I don't know much about flower arranging.) Your flowers look great! Very inspiring. And LOVE the Foxgloves in there! One of my favorites!

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    1. I understand that hesitancy to remove flowers from the garden "before their time," Danielle. I used to cut only the flowers I had lots of and, in my former tiny garden, there weren't many of those. I still experience a little pang of guilt every time I cut a flower but I've developed all kinds of rationales to support my behavior: some plants produce more flowers when you cut them; on hot days, the flowers will last longer inside than outside; when I can't be outside, I can enjoy elements of my garden inside; etc.

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  3. Kris, I like your colorful arrangement very much. You have such interesting and different plants than I do and it's a pleasure to learn about them them through your blog. For example, I was not familiar with Grevillea 'Superb'--it has an interesting form and color. All of your flowers look so fresh--I especially like the rose and the dahlia. Susie

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    1. The Grevillea genus does especially well here in Southern California, Susie, at least if sufficient sun is provided. I fell in love with G. 'Superb' the first time I saw it in the nursery and obsessed about it until I brought one home. I think this is the first time I've cut one for a vase, though, so it remains to be seen how long it lasts as a cut flower.

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  4. The colours in that arrangement are just beautiful Kris.
    But scrolling down the posts I am bowled over by your garden, it is fabulous. I love the low hedge you've used to anchor that incredible view.

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    1. I'm afraid I can't take responsibility for the hedge, rusty duck. We inherited it when we bought the house 3 years ago. It does do a nice job of framing the view, though, doesn't it?

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  5. The colours of your blooms work really well together. I like the simple style in the teapot, in fact I like everything about this vase, especially with the lemons!

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    1. My lemon tree is a relentless producer. It literally never stops. Last year, it was so heavily laden with fruit, I put bags of lemons at the curb edge with a sign encouraging my neighbors to take some.

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  6. You have some stunning blooms in your arrangement this week Kris - and I love your teapot and the lemons. It all adds up to a very summery feel.

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    1. It's too bad I can't make an arrangement with lemons, Julie - I have bushels of those!

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  7. From week to week you produce such lovely arrangements. This is one of the best. I adore the Grevillea 'Superb.'

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    1. The Grevillea is definitely a keeper, Deb.

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  8. I always love your arrangements Kris. Your choice of flowers is stunning. I love them all particularly the Grevillea. They look so pretty in your teapot.

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    1. I think it was the Grevillea, not the rose, that really pulled the arrangement together this week.

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  9. How very lovely! that still life with the lemons would make a fantastic still life painting. Beautiful work Kris

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    1. Ah, if only I had a trace of skill in painting, Deanne.

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  10. These flowers are all so pretty, and refreshing somehow - the colour mix reminds me of a dish of ice cream, but that may be because it's so hot here at the moment! Beautifully arranged and photographed, and in a very suitable pot too. :)

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  11. What a gorgeous arrangement and the loveliest of teapots, too. They make for beautiful vases don't they? Fun that we both used a similar vessel. Your flowers are other-worldly.

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