Monday, December 14, 2020

In a Vase on Monday: Fragile Flowers

The flowers available for cutting are in shorter supply now and the blooms I do have generally don't have long vase-lives.  In recognition of the season, the first arrangement is a mix of red and green with a few splashes of white.  I emphasized a variety of foliage so that it may retain some interest even when the flowers collapse.  

Grevillea 'Ned Kelly' wasn't meant to be the floral focus of this arrangement but I couldn't resist.  'Ned' is far less generous with its blooms than my other large-flowered Grevilleas, 'Superb' and 'Peaches & Cream' so I don't use it often in arrangements.

My original inspiration for the arrangement, the flowers of pink powder-puff (Calliandra haematocephala), ended up in what I've designated the back of the arrangement, although it can be viewed from all angles where it sits.  The powder puffs only last a couple of days at most and I doubt the brownish-red buds will open on cut stems but they offer their own kind of interest.

Top view

The vase contains: Top row - Calliandra haematocephala, Coloenema pulchella 'Sunset Gold', and Dianthus 'Dash White'
Middle row - Grevillea 'Ned Kelly', Leucadendron salignum 'Chief', and L. 'Winter Red'
Bottom row - Penstemon mexicali 'Mini Red Bells' and Westringia fruticosa 'Morning Light'

The second, smaller arrangement made use of the current abundance of Camellia sasanqua.  As our humidity levels have been low more often than not recently, the Camellia blooms wither quickly, even in their protected spot under the roof eave on the north side of the house.  There are lots of flowers but finding a few in pristine condition with stems of a decent length was a little bit of a challenge.

At best, these Camillia flowers will last 2-3 days

The uninteresting back view

Top view

Clockwise from the upper left: Argyranthemum 'Angelic Giant Pink', two unidentified forms of Camellia sasanqua, Leptospermum 'Copper Glow', and Coprosma repens 'Plum Hussey'

For more IAVOM, most created in colder areas than mine, visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.


All material © 2012-2020 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

22 comments:

  1. They are both fabulous Kris! I do enjoy seeing your flowers at any time of year, but in our winter even more so. That Grevillea is delicious... who could resisit using that indeed. And the pink powder puff is such fun! Have a good week Kris. xx

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    1. I really wish I could unlock the secret of encouraging more blooms from 'Ned Kelly', Cathy. I planted 2 more of the shrubs but, even taken as a group, they're nowhere near as robust as 'Superb' and 'Peaches & Cream'.

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  2. Leucadendron ‘Winter Red’ reminds me of a tulip. It goes so well with the Calliandra and Grevillea. The penstemon does too.

    I love the arrangement with the camellias and pink daisies.

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    1. Yes, some of the Leucadendrons like to mimic tulips and rose buds. At least one plays at imitating a cone flower. They're wonderful plants and I'm lucky they're well-adapted to my climate despite hailing from South Africa.

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  3. The Grevillea is delicious! I looked for Leucadendron here and can't find any, which is a clue. The Powderpuff does well here though, so peculiar these things. I really love all your colors, hopefully they last well. My grandma always floated Camellias in a cut glass bowl. It was her traditional Christmas arrangement with Sasanquas.

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    1. If I had more variety among my Camellias, I'd try floating the flowers in a bowl too, Amelia.

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  4. Oh that second vase is especially pretty Kris, and I like the way the blooms in the first vase pick out the reds in the foliage. It's always intersting to see what different people come up with whn it's a relatively lean time for blooms

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    1. Unfortunately, the Camellias are disintegrating even faster than usual this week. I think that's the fault of the heater running almost non-stop.

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  5. I'm pretty sure any of your vases will look great even sans blooms.

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    1. I wish I were better with the foliage-centric arrangements Loree of danger garden is a master at creating.

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  6. Your camellias are cheerful. I love the Grevillea and leucadendrons. Also wish I still had dianthus, very pretty vases Kris! Enjoy a good week.

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    1. Dianthus pops up in our garden centers when our temperatures cool and I usually end up bringing at least one variety home each year, Susie. The plants don't handle our summers well, however.

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  7. What a great name - Angelic Giant Pink! And very pretty too, sitting alongside the camellias. I always think camellias are so glamorous! Two lovely vases Kris! Thank you! Amanda

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    1. I do love all the Argyranthemums, which are the closest we come to chrysanthemums. (Well, garden centers here do sell true chrysanthemums but they don't have much staying power and are more commonly short-lived hostess gifts.) I wish the Argyranthemums had longer stems, though.

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  8. Both vases are beautiful. Grevillea ‘Ned Kelly’ has a fantastic bloom and the Calliandra bloom just glows! The 2nd arrangement with the magenta and soft pinks with especially the Coprosma but also the Leptospermum is perfect! Have a great week.

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    1. Given adequate space, Calliandra is a great bloomer but, like those I inherited with this garden, most I've seen tend to be grown as hedge and foundation plants. They do take shearing well but that's done at the cost of the flowers.

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  9. Lovely arrangements, Kris. Even though they may be short-lived, the Calliandra are fabulous. Also love 'Ned Kelly' - Grevilleas have the coolest flowers.
    Pretty in pink, the second vase's Argyranthemum 'Angelic Giant Pink' is lovely the way the petals fade outward to a lighter color.
    Hope you have a good week ahead. Christmas is fast approaching... not that many of us are gathering, except in spirit.

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    1. As you know, I operate under the spell of Grevilleas (and Leucadendrons), Eliza - I can't imagine this garden without them.

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  10. Both bouquets are delightful, Kris, the first one is especially successful and goes so well with that vase. I must give Grevillea a try, now that winters seem milder.

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    1. Our climates are changing, Annette. I hope you have an opportunity to grow a Grevillea to two - they are marvelous plants.

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  11. Your arrangements are so joyful and the colours a nice nod to the season. Love that first vase!

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    1. Thanks Allison! Red flowers are in short supply here but luckily some of my foliage is red-tinged.

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